Transposing emblem by Mary Ranaldo

Social polarization is a very popular topic at the moment. The term social polarization or polarizzazione is a word borrowed from physics to explain a process that determines a concentration of normally opposing forces. The term social polarization was introduced by a British sociologist, Peter Townsend, according to whom “wealth and poverty are increasingly polarized”. In simple words, the gap between the rich and poor is widening more and more, creating profound social inequality. To be fair, this phenomenon is occurring throughout Europe, but Italy is particularly vulnerable because of its political and economic fragility.

Roma, Italy – Downward – Michele Bitetto

In 2016 a survey by Bankitalia showed that one out of four people is subject to poverty and social exclusion. By contrast, 5% of the population holds 30% of the total wealth. It would be logical to think that technological progress will lead us to a more equitable distribution of wealth, bringing enormous advantages for all of society. It’s true that technology has changed our way of living and made life easier. Since everyone more or less has access to new technologies: increasingly sophisticated cars, smarter phones, multifunctional appliances, it seems that everyone is better off now than in the past. But it is all an illusion: the official data, issued by a serious institution in the country, tell us another story, put simply: the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer.

Florence, Italy – Festival of Lights – Dan

Extensive polarization has consequences for the social fabric, including high levels of unemployment, widespread crime and greater health problems among the population. A society in which this polarization is less profound is a more cohesive society, with a more dynamic population, a high level of trust and less violence, because all of society benefits from the fairest distribution of wealth. The principle is that if everyone is better, you live happily.

Milan, Italy – On top of Duomo – Jilbert Ebrahimi

In Italy, the concept of polarization has a long history and is rooted in society, between the wealthier and more dynamic north and the poorer and laissez-faire attitude in the south. It also persists in new generations. The negative remnants left by the economic crisis have affected income in sections of the population that were usually considered well off – the middle-income families. This development is to be found not only on the national level, but also between the individual regions and within the same region. The impoverishment of a large part of the Italian population is one of the causes of social polarization.

Cannaregio, Italy – In the rain – Martino Pietropoli

But the economic factor is not the only one. Italian society is in the midst of a full identity crisis. Capitalism is no longer the answer to the needs of the nation, and its foundations represented by labor, the welfare state and pensions, are weakening more and more. Faced with this crisis, political forces appear to be far from providing drastic and concrete solutions. The Italian political world is crumbling, historical parties are losing popularity because they are no longer able to identify with real and practical problems. The result is an extremely fragmented and therefore weaker political landscape. To the full advantage of populist and extremist movements. The elections in March 2018 rewarded two camps, completely different from each other, but able to find common ground and govern. They clearly reflect the polarization of society, divided between those who claim to be the true representatives of the people and declare that they want to change the way of governing in order to be closer to the folk on the one hand, and those who interpret the most radical needs of a part of society on the other. Rather than representing the citizens, what has come out of the elections is the desperate cry of a polarized society that no longer has confidence in its future.

Venice, Italy – On the bank – Ashwin Vaswani

Populists and extremist forces take advantage of the vulnerability caused by social divisions. A major divisive force in Italy is the issue of immigrants. It is one of the most urgent problems to be addressed. It has not been helped by the media coverage of immigrants arriving in the Bel Paese, which has encouraged a climate of nervousness. Although in reality their numbers have dropped compared to previous years, we have the perception that our borders are more fragile. The most extreme critics believe that the arrival of migrants increases crime rates, terrorism and disease in the country. The crimes committed by immigrants are amplified by the media, thus encouraging the binomial immigration-crime in Italian public opinion. The strategy adopted seems to be to target migrants, consolidating the juxtaposition/polarization between group membership and outsiders.

Grossetto, Italy – Bathing – Melinda Nagy

Today, the media amplify social polarization. Social media in particular have led to a change in the way we find information. At the moment, the most common way to get information is to search the internet. According to recent studies, users tend to look for information that is closer to their way of thinking, which supports their opinions. Meaning that, what pushes us to select some news is the so-called confirmation bias, which is not necessarily the search for the truth, but for the news that confirms our opinions of reality. In short, we look for news that tends to confirm our prejudices – the famous Echo Chambers by Cass R. Sunstein, according to whom the “internet is driving political fragmentation, polarization and even extremism”.1 These Echo Chambers are bubbles or comfort zones in which people hear over and over again versions of opinions they are already convinced of. The dangerous consequence of this is that you remain stuck to your position without being open to dialogue with those who think differently – a form of polarization that is detrimental to society.

Mary Ranaldo

Works Cited

1. Sunstein, Cass R. Republic, Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media. 2017

Credits

Snapshot 1: Milan, Italy, Zeroing in – Frida Aguilar Estrada (Unsplash)

Snapshot 2: Roma, Italy – Downward – Michele Bitetto (Unsplash)

Snapshot 3: Florence, Italy – Festival of Lights – Dan (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 4: Milan, Italy – On top of Duomo – Jilbert Ebrahimi (Unsplash)

Snapshot 5: Cannaregio, Italy – In the rain – Martino Pietropoli (Unsplash)

Snapshot 6: Venice, Italy – On the bank – Ashwin Vaswani (Unsplash)

Snapshot 7: Grossetto, Italy – Bathing – Melinda Nagy (Shutterstock)

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes

Alencar, Joana. Lack of Social Trust – Brazil. January 2019.

Baccino, Alejandra. Polarization within Ourselves – South America. January 2019.

Cordido, Veronica. Hanging by Extremes – Venezuela. January 2019.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Extremism Is Now the New Hype? – Spain. February 2019

Montano, Osvaldo. Progress in the Face of Polarization – Bolivia. February 2019.

Romano, Mavi. Censorship and Cultural Survival in a World without Gods – Spain. January 2019.

Sariñana, Alejandra Gonzalez. Student Movements – Mexico. March 2019.

Sepi, Andreea. A World of Victims and Perpetrators? – Germany and Romania. February 2019.

Sevunts, Nane. The Era To Close – Armenia. March 2019.

Skobic, Alexandar. The Loss of Identity. April 2019.

Sitorus, Rina. Polarization in Politics: All a Cebong or Kampret – Indonesia. March 2019.

Spirito, Julieta. A Thought about Polarized Insecurity. April 2019.

Valenzuela, Monica. Adults and Children. April 2019.

Vuka. Extreme Immunity to Functional Tax and Judicial System – Serbia. March 2019

Wallis, Toni. Walls and Resettlement – South Africa and Angola. February 2019.

Forthcoming

CW 17 – Lebanon – Ghadir Younes
CW 18 – Cuba – Marilin Guerrero Casas
CW 19 – Ukraine – Evgeny Bondarenko
CW 20 – Uruguay – Andrea da Silva Escandell
CW 21 – Spain – Jazz Williams
CW 22 – Armenia – Mania Israyelyan
CW 23 – Poland – Pawel Awdejuk
CW 24 – Balkans – Aleksandar Protic
CW 25 – Italy – Daniela Cannarella
CW 26 – Serbia – Jelena Sekulic
CW 27 – Tajikistan – Nigina Kanunova
CW 28 – Portugal – Nuno Rosalino
CW 29 – Uruguay – Lillian Julber
CW 30 – Argentina – Javier Gomez
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Julieta Spirito
 

“Everything is dual; everything has poles; everything has its pair of opposites; like and unlike are the same; opposites are identical in nature, but different in degree; extremes meet; all truths are but half-truths; all paradoxes may be reconciled.”

The Kybalion

Buenos Aires, Argentina – Graffiti silhouette – Nicolas Lobos

In the past few years, insecurity has grown to be a topic of discussion, worry and concern in Buenos Aires. It has entered the list of “ongoing problems to be solved”, together with inflation, tax increases, lack of resources for hospitals and schools, and low pensions. Every day, we read or hear news about how insecure living in Buenos Aires is. Insecurity is part of our conversations, our daily worries and, most importantly, our claims and complaints.

We read the news regarding crime rates and a huge amount of energy moves in the direction of worrying and complaining. We worry so much that we spend lots of money improving the security of our houses and we complain that the city is not safe enough. But can this really make a difference? Will this really make the feeling of uneasiness disappear?

Buenos Aires, Argentina – Back alley – Jaay dev Singh

All this has made me think about the nature of insecurity. What do we really mean when we talk about it and what we fear?

“There are two sides to everything”, says the old Hermetic axiom, so insecurity and security are two parts of one particular state of mind.

We think that our life should be secure. We believe a secure life is the natural order of things. Everything has to be fixed and in place, work has to be stable, our days have to be organized, traffic has to be smooth, no electricity cuts, no transport strikes, no unexpected events are desired in our lives. We want all this, we demand it and if it does not work this way, we complain.

Buenos Aires, Argentina – Dog walking – Aleksandar Todorovic

But can we ever really feel secure? And if we do, if we finally get to feel secure, is this something that can last over time?

At the bottom of our claim to security we find fear. We complain because we don’t really want to see, to feel, that our life is very insecure, very uncertain, but not because of something that is now here threatening our life, but because life itself is uncertain. We cannot be sure that all is going to turn out as planned, we cannot know what will happen in the future, but we act as if insecurity or uncertainty should not exist. So we demand security.

We are afraid of losing things, of unexpected changes, of feeling confused and not knowing what to do. We are afraid of feeling unprotected and in danger; ultimately, we are afraid of death. Mass media understands this underlying fear and exploits it by feeding us a constant flow of terrifying news that confirms our worst nightmares.

Pinamar, Argentina – To the beach – Juan Cruz Mountford

But we can take a moment to reflect calmly on this issue: Death is an inexorable fact in our existence even though we avoid thinking about it. Can we avoid it by creating a secure life around us? And what is more, are we really creating security or is it an illusion? We rarely stop to think that we might die any minute or that our loved ones might. Our life is indeed fragile. Also, we don’t think very often about how we would like to pass away: In fear or in peace? In anger or reconciled? And also, what kind of life do we need to lead in order to enjoy a peaceful end?

These are profound questions about our existence, and we don’t often give them much thought because in order to do so, we should first accept death as a natural part of our existence. Instead, we spend our lives worrying about the little things in life. It becomes very important if I can buy this or that, if I can go on vacation to this or that place, if the car broke down, little conflicts with other people, if this or that person was rude to me, etc.. Caught in these endless pursuits, we not only become blind to the fragility of our lives, we also prevent real concerns from participating in our mentations. What is the meaning of my life in this world? What traces will I leave in the world when I am gone? What is the meaning of my suffering? We don’t understand what the meaning of this feeling of insecurity and the urge to create security really is.

Buenos Aires, Argentina – City mood – Marc Schadegg

Danger is an inescapable condition of our existence, a feeling that keeps us alert and attentive to potential unexpected events and prevents us from falling asleep in illusory security and comfort. When things do not work or do not go as planned, when people do not react as we expected they would, there is a conflict inside us and this very conflict makes us grow, adapt, readjust our ideas and admit new worldviews. Conflict forces us to find new resources and different means to deal with a situation. Contradictions, uncertainty and insecurity make us feel helpless and impotent and this produces suffering. But this is the truth. A truth that is more profound than our daily worries: that we have no control over many things, we cannot avoid accidents or a rise in inflation, but we can be alert and marvel, trying to understand what this is all about.

By admitting this, we come to accept that our existence is frail, and for that, it can be considered a gift, that having a secure life is an illusion and that the feeling of insecurity and uncertainty can be our ally, keeping us alert and attentive to what is necessary at this moment, keeping our mind active to figure what our options are at the present moment.

When we no longer reject insecurity, we begin to accept life.

Julieta Spirito

Works Cited

The Kybalion. A Study of The Hermetic Philosophy of Ancient Egypt and Greece, 1908, Three Inititates (1862-1932), YOGeBooks: Hollister, MO, page 12.

Credits

Snapshot 1: Luis Guillon, Argentina – Into the night – Esteban Bernal (Unsplash)

Snapshot 2: Buenos Aires, Argentina – Graffiti silhouette – Nicolas Lobos (Unsplash)

Snapshot 3: Buenos Aires, Argentina – Back alley – Jaay dev Singh (Unsplash)

Snapshot 4: Buenos Aires, Argentina – Dog walking – Aleksandar Todorovic (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 5: Pinamar, Argentina – To the beach – Juan Cruz Mountford (Unsplash)

Snapshot 6: Buenos Aires, Argentina – City mood – Marc Schadegg (Unsplash)

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes

Alencar, Joana. Lack of Social Trust – Brazil. January 2019.

Baccino, Alejandra. Polarization within Ourselves – South America. January 2019.

Cordido, Veronica. Hanging by Extremes – Venezuela. January 2019.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Extremism Is Now the New Hype? – Spain. February 2019

Montano, Osvaldo. Progress in the Face of Polarization – Bolivia. February 2019.

Romano, Mavi. Censorship and Cultural Survival in a World without Gods – Spain. January 2019.

Sariñana, Alejandra Gonzalez. Student Movements – Mexico. March 2019.

Sepi, Andreea. A World of Victims and Perpetrators? – Germany and Romania. February 2019.

Sevunts, Nane. The Era To Close – Armenia. March 2019.

Skobic, Alexandar. The Loss of Identity. April 2019.

Sitorus, Rina. Polarization in Politics: All a Cebong or Kampret – Indonesia. March 2019.

Valenzuela, Monica. Adults and Children. April 2019.

Vuka. Extreme Immunity to Functional Tax and Judicial System – Serbia. March 2019

Wallis, Toni. Walls and Resettlement – South Africa and Angola. February 2019.

Forthcoming

CW 16 – Italy – Mary Ranaldo
CW 17 – Lebanon – Ghadir Younes
CW 18 – Cuba – Marilin Guerrero Casas
CW 19 – Ukraine – Evgeny Bondarenko
CW 20 – Uruguay – Andrea da Silva Escandell
CW 21 – Spain – Jazz Williams
CW 22 – Armenia – Mania Israyelyan
CW 23 – Poland – Pawel Awdejuk
CW 24 – Balkans – Aleksandar Protic
CW 25 – Italy – Daniela Cannarella
CW 26 – Serbia – Jelena Sekulic
CW 27 – Tajikistan – Nigina Kanunova
CW 28 – Portugal – Nuno Rosalino
CW 29 – Uruguay – Lillian Julber
CW 30 – Argentina – Javier Gomez
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Aleksandar Skobic

There was this country called Yugoslavia. It consisted of six different republics and three different nations and a number of national minorities, all joined under the flag of brotherhood and unity. The country was young, full of enthusiasm and its industry and economy were expanding.

I was born in a town that was built right after WWII, around the newly constructed factory. The population in my town consisted of 21 different nationalities. Can you imagine it?

I cannot, or at least I could not at that time, because I thought we were all Yugoslavs. We were all one. We were raised on propaganda movies, TV shows, parades, various social events, all having a strong message that we are a young nation that should gather under one flag, around one person – the son of all our nations and nationalities. I will not say his name because he is a ghost now. Maybe he always was, but we were so dazzled by the myth about him that we did not notice it.

New Belgrade, Serbia – On the Danube – poludziber

Nothing happens over night. Historical events and the events that destroy the history we know develop over many years, decades… The same goes for the breakup of Yugoslavia.

Most of the kids in my class at school suddenly started to become divided, to form smaller groups, to point fingers at each other. Muslims took one corner of our classroom, Croats the other, Serbs the third. The fourth corner belonged to those kids from mixed, interethnic marriages. I was asked one day, politely, without any antagonism or “a must”: Come over here, we would like to ask you something… And that’s how I became someone else, without having an opportunity to grow up and become someone in the first place.

Zagreb, Croatia – You see? – Buco Balkanessi

So, instead of drawing a Yugoslav flag, we all started secretly drawing emblems and flags of our own nations. We would whisper verses of national songs, and I have no idea how we even knew the lyrics of most of them. They were probably encoded in our DNA. Or we just listened carefully to our parents and cousins who would quietly sing these songs, half-drunk, half-mesmerized by something they called (and despised publicly) as nationalism.

And again, not over night, but anyway it caught us who believed in Yugoslavia, as a surprise – all hell broke loose.

Pancevo, Serbia – In the park cafe – Ljupce Mihajlovski

No one can understand it, even those of us who experienced it, still can’t understand how it is possible to lose your identity so fast, so suddenly, that it takes you years to comprehend it, to get over it, to rise from it in a different body, mindset, soul.

You stopped being Yugoslav and became somebody new. Serb, in my case. Our town became a place of tensions, polarization, and segregation. Local Croatian militia patrols “controlled” the streets, armed, often drunk, yelling through the night, harassing everyone, and we lived in constant fear. No one was safe because no one really knew where the danger was coming from.

Zagreb, Croatia – Milling around – Zdravko

My sister and I were on the last bus that left my town for the next two years. We travelled through barricades full of bloody, drunk and reckless militia members of all three nationalities just to play the role of refugees amongst our own (because not many of my cousins, neighbors and the other Serbs considered us equal to themselves, but as refugees).

My parents were held captive for the next two years, and we did not know if they were alive. Sometimes, we would get a message over the amateur radio that they were alive and well, from people we never heard of, very often from people of the same nationality that held our parents as captives.

Belgrade, Serbia – On the street – miamia

Today, 20 years after the civil war, we are now a deeply divided society, in a country that no one is happy with. But what amazes me (and frightens me at the same time) is that you don’t need someone who is of a different nation to be an extremist. No, it works perfectly well in every town, in every village, in every street of this poor so-called country.

Due to the civil war, there were many displaced persons, and communities are now mostly mono-ethnic. Nevertheless, divisions and polarization are clear as day. People divide between natives and refugees, where natives consider themselves to be the sole group entitled to employment, politics, etc.. The displaced (or the refugees) usually stick to themselves, thinking that if you are organized in a group, it will help you achieve what you want. But that’s only until you achieve it, then you need no one else.

Zagreb, Croatia – Afternoon – Viktor Juric

And that’s not all. Even the refugees are divided by the places they come from (I wouldn’t be surprised if we started to divide ourselves by the streets we grew up in, or even by building entrances). And the tensions between these groups are visible everywhere – in bars, at weddings and funerals, in work places and on lines in front of the employment offices. And you can see these divisions amongst Muslims, Serbs and Croats, and ironically, we are again united in these divisions.

Aleksandar Skobic

Credits

Snapshot 1: Koper, Slovenia – Walking – Martin Dörsch (Unsplash)

Snapshot 2: New Belgrade, Serbia – On the Danube – poludziber (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 3: Zagreb, Croatia – You see – Buco Balkanessi (Unsplash)

Snapshot 4: Pancevo, Serbia – In the park cafe – Ljupce Mihajlovski (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 5: Zagreb, Croatia – Milling around – Zdravko (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 6: Belgrade, Serbia – On the street – miamia (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 7: Zagreb, Croatia – Afternoon – Viktor Juric (Unsplash)

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes

Alencar, Joana. Lack of Social Trust – Brazil. January 2019.

Baccino, Alejandra. Polarization within Ourselves – South America. January 2019.

Cordido, Veronica. Hanging by Extremes – Venezuela. January 2019.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Extremism Is Now the New Hype? – Spain. February 2019

Montano, Osvaldo. Progress in the Face of Polarization – Bolivia. February 2019.

Romano, Mavi. Censorship and Cultural Survival in a World without Gods – Spain. January 2019.

Sariñana, Alejandra Gonzalez. Student Movements – Mexico. March 2019.

Sepi, Andreea. A World of Victims and Perpetrators? – Germany and Romania. February 2019.

Sevunts, Nane. The Era To Close – Armenia. March 2019.

Sitorus, Rina. Polarization in Politics: All a Cebong or Kampret – Indonesia. March 2019.

Valenzuela, Monica. Adults and Children. April 2019.

Vuka. Extreme Immunity to Functional Tax and Judicial System – Serbia. March 2019

Wallis, Toni. Walls and Resettlement – South Africa and Angola. February 2019.

Forthcoming

CW 15 – Argentina – Julieta Spirito
CW 16 – Italy – Mary Ranaldo
CW 17 – Lebanon – Ghadir Younes
CW 18 – Cuba – Marilin Guerrero Casas
CW 19 – Ukraine – Evgeny Bondarenko
CW 20 – Uruguay – Andrea da Silva Escandell
CW 21 – Spain – Jazz Williams
CW 22 – Armenia – Mania Israyelyan
CW 23 – Poland – Pawel Awdejuk
CW 24 – Balkans – Aleksandar Protic
CW 25 – Italy – Daniela Cannarella
CW 26 – Serbia – Jelena Sekulic
CW 27 – Tajikistan – Nigina Kanunova
CW 28 – Portugal – Nuno Rosalino
CW 29 – Uruguay – Lillian Julber
CW 30 – Argentina – Javier Gomez
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Monica Valenzuela

A couple of weeks ago, I was talking to my mom about the differences between how we imagined adult life when we were children and how it really is when we are adults. Despite belonging to different generations, as kids, our problems were similar: money for candies and spending time with our friends, playing in the streets of our neighborhood. We knew that sunset was the alarm to go back home. Mathematics was the most challenging task of our life – at least to me. We used to think that becoming an adult was the best part of growing up because they can be out after sunset, they have money to buy whatever they want, and they do not have to deal with math every week. In a kid’s eyes, all adults are successful.

Barranco, Peru – On the street – Andres Urena

During the conversation with my mom, she told me that the greatest disappointment of being an adult was related to her professional life. She wanted to be a nurse when she was a kid and when she grew up, with the support of her aunt, she studied to become what she always dreamed. She was one of the top students in her class, so she was sent to the neoplastic area of a hospital. She remembers being euphoric about wearing her white clothes and traditional nurse’s hat on her first day of professional training. The problems arrived when she had to help a doctor heal a terrible wound – she remembers it like that. She started crying because she could not stand seeing that kind of lesion. Ultimately, she rejected her dream and stopped being a nurse. Later, she started working in a transnational company for electrical appliances and became a quality assurance supervisor. She worked in that company until her retirement.

Lima, Peru – Crossing – Erik Gonzalez

My mother was not disappointed by becoming a nurse. She was disappointed by what being a nurse meant, the actions involved in it. Like my mom, a lot of us become disillusioned or stop liking some thing or profession because we discover a side we do not like and did not know was included because our idea was completely different. The problem is we do not realize that bitter disappointment can mean a new beginning and new opportunities, like my mom’s case. She became a good employee in a field she never imagined. Unfortunately, when disillusion arrives, we would like to be kids again and avoid knowing the reality we do not like. It is the paradox of growing up: As adults, we would like to be children again.

Why do we miss our childhood? Because, we, adults, have already experienced that period of life and we know for real how it is and what it implies. We miss those days playing at the park, when school was our biggest responsibility, but we do not remember being scolded by our mothers.

Bellavista, Peru – At the market – Rostasedlacek

Why is being an adult harder than we expected? Easy. When we were kids, we were not fully aware of what being an adult really means. We did not know about the tasks coming as part of that package: being responsible for ourselves, payments, loans, etc.. We thought our university days were going to include parties every week end and the courses were going to be super easy because we chose a career we liked. We also thought our life was going to be completely solved at the age of 25; I mean, we were going to have our dream job, own house, car, and, of course, a lot of seals in our passports. We did not know that being an adult was going to increase our pride to the point that losing friends could be as easy as breathing because we want to be right all the time.

Pisac, Peru – Walking home – Nick Albi

If we want to stop desiring a return to our childhood, we need to understand that not being on the millionaires list after graduating is ok. We also need to learn that it is fine to be lost at the age of 29, that part of growing up is to doubt our decisions, to question ourselves if we are doing what we really enjoy because we are talking about our lives. It does not matter what everyone is expecting from us, we need to find our path, the thing that makes us happy. We also need to remember our dreams – professional or personal – and work so they come true because goals are not achieved just based on luck, we need to work for them and we need to be patient and strong to not forget why they are worth it. We need to learn that failure is part of success, but it also implies perseverance and patience.

Lima, Peru – Living – Pablo Padilla

Now that we are adults, we should remember the joy from our childhood and use it to enjoy our jobs, our daily life because as we grow up, it looks like we forget how to enjoy daily activities and things, and we start acting like robots doing everything automatically. And why is that? I think it is because we are so focused on competing among ourselves that we forget that living means enjoying every moment. As our grandparents said, we must enjoy the road, not just the victory at the end.

Being an adult is not that difficult, ultimately, the secret is finding the right balance between our inner kid and the adult we want to be.

Monica Valenzuela

Credits

Snapshot 1: Peru – Nazca lines – Stanislav Beloglazov (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 2: Barranco, Peru – On the street – Andres Urena (Unsplash)

Snapshot 3: Lima, Peru – Crossing – Erik Gonzalez (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 4: Bellavista, Peru – At the market – Rostasedlacek (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 5: Pisac, Peru – Walking home – Nick Albi (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 6: Lima, Peru – Living – Pablo Padilla (Unsplash)

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes

Alencar, Joana. Lack of Social Trust – Brazil. January 2019.

Baccino, Alejandra. Polarization within Ourselves – South America. January 2019.

Cordido, Veronica. Hanging by Extremes – Venezuela. January 2019.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Extremism Is Now the New Hype? – Spain. February 2019

Montano, Osvaldo. Progress in the Face of Polarization – Bolivia. February 2019.

Romano, Mavi. Censorship and Cultural Survival in a World without Gods – Spain. January 2019.

Sariñana, Alejandra Gonzalez. Student Movements – Mexico. March 2019.

Sepi, Andreea. A World of Victims and Perpetrators? – Germany and Romania. February 2019.

Sevunts, Nane. The Era To Close – Armenia. March 2019.

Sitorus, Rina. Polarization in Politics: All a Cebong or Kampret – Indonesia. March 2018.

Vuka. Extreme Immunity to Functional Tax and Judicial System – Serbia. March 2019

Wallis, Toni. Walls and Resettlement – South Africa and Angola. February 2019.

Forthcoming

CW 14 – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Aleksandar Skobic
CW 15 – Argentina – Julieta Spirito
CW 16 – Italy – Mary Ranaldo
CW 17 – Lebanon – Ghadir Younes
CW 18 – Cuba – Marilin Guerrero Casas
CW 19 – Ukraine – Evgeny Bondarenko
CW 20 – Uruguay – Andrea da Silva Escandell
CW 21 – Spain – Jazz Williams
CW 22 – Armenia – Mania Israyelyan
CW 23 – Poland – Pawel Awdejuk
CW 24 – Balkans – Aleksandar Protic
CW 25 – Italy – Daniela Cannarella
CW 26 – Serbia – Jelena Sekulic
CW 27 – Tajikistan – Nigina Kanunova
CW 28 – Portugal – Nuno Rosalino
CW 29 – Uruguay – Lillian Julber
CW 30 – Argentina – Javier Gomez
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Vuka [Vuka kao reka]

We live in a highly particularized environment saturated with very compartmentalized views on malfunctions in social dynamics. When we say polarization we mean internal frictions down one single vector, within a particular group or a scene which is sharing common disregard for those who are not taking sides on that particular issue of concern. But these opposing parts of a particular cohort – they don’t see themselves as humans sharing a certain disregard for other humans and therefore carrying an even bigger burden of ethical responsibility to learn the lesser known aspects. The majority of those members of “field-specific poles” see themselves as particularly self-righteous outliers of the poor ignorant society’s distribution. Each of the cohort members believes that they are bearing the burden of responsibility to wake up the Serb world to the danger of the point professed by the opposing pole’s subset of the same cohort. It’s a kind of hate-based clustering of particular advocates for particular social causes.

Belgrade, Serbia – Shuttered – Valentine Salja

● People from the media vector-sector lament that society is too ignorant to see that the marginalized issue of the quality of journalistic life and work should immediately be brought to the epicenter of public attention [1]

● People from the civil engineering vector-sector lament that society is too ignorant to see the marginalized issue of changing the urban and infrastructural face of traffic in the capital and between cities [2]

● People in the weed-decriminalization/hyper-criminalization vector-sector lament that society is blind to see the marginalized issue of fighting vague anti-drug ideals [4a] (which excludes free sales of psychiatric prescription drugs on flea markets and elsewhere [3]) versus the elitist neo-liberal model of health-profiteering. [4b]

● People in academic circles are particularly marginalized and even chronically so. Just as their American or British non-identity-politics-oriented peers, they are in fear of losing their jobs. [5]

● The government wants more newborns and women want their maternal leave to be paid beyond a merely symbolic amount, etc.

Belgrade, Serbia – Peeping – Radio Kafka

We’re kind of a nation of outliers with huge gaps in normalcy because each pole within each cohort regards the opposing pole as totally crazy, and their own self as being totally victimized. A bunch of people gone crazy for being terrorized by a bunch of crazy people, multiplied by the number of particular industries within which they would very much prefer to operate freely. Alas, they linger where they are, oppressed by a bunch of wackos and deprived of the basic human right to function normally.

And where’s normal? That’s what nobody knows because the feedback loops on evaluating public interventions and comparing different models of opportunities and capacities to invest – they have been blown away.

Belgrade, Serbia – Recognize – Marija Zaric

“In public discourse, the term evaluation of public policy is hardly ever heard of. Take the policy of subsidies for foreign investors, for example:

There’s no way we could have an unbiased conversation on the feasibility of this government program because we have no input on the quantity of the subsidies granted: which companies within which industries were supported. Nor could we in any way learn how their business logic played out for the national treasury, GDP, job creation and for the economic power of the population. The same goes for the project of building a national sports arena, as with similar undertakings that are being announced. We’re still not presented with the projected benefits from building that stadium – no knowledge of the return on investment time frame, no intel on social benefits beyond financial ones.

Exactly this absolute absence of information that would serve as the basis for an estimate of the economic and social dimensions of a project has led me to believe that its whole purpose boils down exclusively to the political aspect: to satisfy and respond to the promotion and particular needs of certain stakeholders.” – Mihailo Djukić, economics mathematician [6]

Belgrade, Serbia – Revolving – Marija Zaric

But then, if politics were a bunch of self-appointed stakeholders in love with their mugshots in print and .jpg/.mpeg format in promo material, how on earth do we call politics as in the history of political science a kind of politics? How do we make up for the misappropriated word? If social welfare and economy don’t fall into the category of politics, what would be the name of the basket they belong to?

Then, who are the stakeholders and how do they want to view themselves?

● They believe that an independent coup of humanitarian intervention cheaper than $12k can root out a couple-of-decades-long accumulation of one social issue or another [7];

● The cash for infrastructure investment is, from their perspective, demanded as it is from a sugar daddy – be it an international investment fund offering an expensive loan or a national treasury offering a slice of the taxpayer’s collective givings – whatever. As long as nobody is bothered by the fact that the single price they are so connoisseur-ly talking about varies from $1 to $100 million within a couple of sentences of a single report [8]. And that is not the first miscalculation.

Serbia, Novi Sad – Reversed – Marijana Vasic

Naturally, such a social field inevitably produces new, creative and unorthodox job opening lines. For example, the “get mistrialed and then charge for the compensation” source of income [9].

What goes uninspected is the capacity of a transdisciplinary approach to reframe the issue underlying all industries and social strata: the shared problem of incapacity to observe a human as a human, and as a collection of experiences and insights.

“There’s an active notion of neutrality that people don’t understand. Transcendent neutrality isn’t an attitude of “I won’t take sides,” it’s compassion. Where you do see more than just what separates people or sides.” – Susan Sontag [10]

Beograd, Serbia – Flash – Ali Arif Soydas

What if this cultivated Serbs immunity to a functional tax and judicial system, unlocked by one neat observational study following evaluation parameters not as proposed by the Big Philanthropy standard grant application form, but within the “gratitude – compassion – acceptance – meaning – forgiveness” framework[11]?

Where would I be starting my forgiveness metric?

For one, there are those police squads who neatly perform regular raids in the refugee camps – the foreign war stricken emergent population’s temporary board and lodging which is (unfortunately, but I forgive) closed for those poverty-threatened and stricken domestic people who’d like to take refuge from domestic violence or from growing social suffering. [12]

Bezdan, Serbia – Birds on a wire – Nikola Johnny Mirkovic

● I would like to forgive all of those cops for, while raiding to find weapons and drugs, never simultaneously collecting the health survey feedback [13] and

● I’d forgive them for those refugee camps not having a cannabis plantation along with paper & textile production lines as well as bud-packing and a quality assurance lab in the Uruguayan format [14].

● Then I’d also like to forgive both those cops and their intercity peers for not coordinating buds to be delivered to the network of local social service centers and for not having organized all the hemp paper and textiles to be placed at the disposal of production facilities for super-durable textbooks and school uniforms for kids (age K12 and higher) to use, look after, maybe upgrade in design, and then inherit and exchange among each other. So I forgive them also for a typical Serbian parent having to assign 3 full monthly wages per year for their schoolkid in officially free compulsory education.

● Then, those same cops along with the ones who are servicing centers for social work, I forgive them for not opening the opportunity for the neediest to pay for the assistance they need [15] in buds that are home-grown, or (along with the health survey questionnaire) provided by the responsible social worker, or in cash as always.

Petrovaradin, Serbia – Droned – Paddy Walker

In the next step,

● I will forgive, to start with, my imaginary influential army of well accommodated social workers (who in the meantime have evolved into education/professional orientation/geo-social mobility agents for all-inclusive refugee camp temporary residents) for not mobilizing imaginary professionalized caregivers to report on non-hospitalized patients’ state of health, along with their own, and the health of the kid (aged 19 to 91) who helped with daily errands and got paid in bud which they sold to the first red-eyed tourist or postmodern deconstructivist and stayed safe with the pocket money for a day or two. Secondly, but seventhly, I forgive those imaginarily professionalized caregivers for not harvesting those same forms just filled out by all other neighbors and relatives who are also interested in building a vital system for delivering health.

Belgrade, Serbia – Contemplate – Marija Zaric

Before that,

● I forgive the Public Health Institute Batut [16], so the cops are not carrying the full weight of my robust forgiveness. As always, Batut is drowning in paperwork relevant to World Bank parameters, as global standards prescribe, while combating standard pandemic route vectors (with zero support from the arts & culture sector, oddly enough). I forgive them for having no resources whatsoever to invest in piloting the pot-powered inquiry on the social, economic, intellectual and emotional, thus spiritual state of public health, nor do they have any space to consider sky farming on rooftops of healthcare facilities – all that in the country of the sweetest smelling rich variety of herbs for medicinal use and veggie cuisine.

● I forgive the arts & culture sector for keeping their audiences in such low but easily irritable spirits. But first and foremost, I’m going to go finding forgiveness for all those self-appointed political stakeholders who are being too racist to learn from Indian or African experience [17].

Vuka [Vuka kao reka]

Footnotes

1 – Highly charged with emotion, name calling and brutal retribution https://www.slobodnaevropa.org/a/srbija-mediji-linc/29575412.html

2 – The president got sick and tired of mudslides ruining the road. Therefore, he decided to move the hill so the mud would have nowhere to slide from http://rs.n1info.com/a417142/Vesti/Strucnjaci-o-rusenju-brda-kod-Grdelicke-klisure.html – The president got sick and tired of low natality in tall residential buildings. Therefore, he has decided to have short residential buildings built https://www.danas.rs/drustvo/strucnjaci-nisu-culi-za-vucicev-recept-za-natalitet/

3 – “We used to exchange books with friends and neighbors, now we exchange happy pills” [05:45] https://youtu.be/Eg72kk4iRGc

4 a – The last debate between anti-drugers and pot decriminalization advocates was abruptly terminated because “the highly ideological ones” got physical and were spilling bodily fluids into opponents’ faces https://www.telegraf.rs/vesti/1297372-pljunuo-studentkinju-u-lice-incident-na-tribini-o-legalizaciji-marihuane-na-fpn-u

4 b – Some Czech-based business wants to monopolize cannabis use. Besides boasting that it has the longest (though futile) history of cannabis advocacy, they promote the superiority of self-medicating over professional healthcare opinions – all to be charged both as out-of-pocket personal spending and at the expense of the state healthcare fund http://irka.org.rs/

5 – The spectrum covers everything from Jonathan Haidt’s “Coddling of the American Mind” (The Atlantic) to Anna Fazackerley’s “UK Universities struggle to deal with toxic trans rights” (Guardian) and then translates into elitist and national chauvinistic vulnerability and reactivity.

0 – Blowing in the Wind https://youtu.be/DFvkhzkS4bw

6 – Mihajlo Djukić, full article http://bif.rs/2018/10/mihajlo-dukic-institut-ekonomskih-nauka-imamo-kompetentne-ljude-ali-ih-niko-ne-konsultuje/

7 – A typical call for applications for grants from domestic phylantropic outbursts; very similar to the Big Philanthropy formatted logic https://blog.vivifyideas.com/vivify-ideas-konkurs-dru%C5%A1tvenog-fonda-a90bec343949 Maybe some banks are too big to fail, but some companies are definitely too big to pay taxes – both abroad and in Serbia https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/oct/26/dont-want-billionaires-philanthropy-pay-their-taxes

8 – Minister complains about road construction going awry, so she decided that the new investment has to cover the same from the start, and then, at some point, somebody will figure out what went wrong in the first place https://www.danas.rs/ekonomija/mihajlovic-moramo-ponovo-da-uradimo-vec-izgradjen-auto-put-koji-je-placen-100-miliona-dolara/

9 – The compensation for a mistrial can amount to €59 million: https://gerila.rs/cifra-ide-i-do-59-miliona-evra/

10 – Susan Sontag for Rolling Stone: https://www.brainpickings.org/2014/06/24/susan-sontag-middle-center-jonathan-cott/

11 Hamblin, James. “Attention: A Muscle to Strengthen.” The Atlantic. Jan. 22, 2015: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/01/three-neural-predispositions/384642/

12 Farmer, Paul. “On Suffering and Structural Violence: A View from Below.” Race / Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts. January 2009: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/241896604_On_Suffering_and_Structural_Violence_A_View_from_Below

13 – Something like http://healthpolicy.ucla.edu/chis/Pages/default.aspx

14 Le, Bryan. “Uruguay President Nominated for Nobel Peace Prize” The Fix. February, 10, 2014: https://www.thefix.com/content/uruguay-president-jose-mujica-nominated-nobel-peace-prize

15 Slaughter, Anne-Marie. “The Work That Makes Work Possible” The Atlantic. March 23, 2016: https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/03/unpaid-caregivers/474894/

16 Institute of Public Health Serbia: http://www.batut.org.rs/index.php?lang=2

17 Jeevan, Sharath. “From ‘Lean Start-Up’ to ‘Lean Collaboration’” Stanford Social Innovation Review. Sept. 29, 2017: https://ssir.org/articles/entry/from_lean_start_up_to_lean_collaborationhttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bisi_Silva

Credits

Snapshot 1: Belgrade, Seria – Walled – Marija Zaric (Unsplash)

Snapshot 2: Belgrade, Serbia – Shuttered – Valentine Salja (Unsplash)

Snapshot 3: Belgrade, Serbia – Peeping – Radio Kafka (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 4: Belgrade, Serbia – Recognize – Marija Zaric (Unsplash)

Snapshot 5: Belgrade, Serbia – Revolving – Marija Zaric (Unsplash)

Snapshot 6: Serbia, Novi Sad – Reversed – Marijana Vasic (Unsplash)

Snapshot 7: Beograd, Serbia – Flash – Ali Arif Soydas (Unsplash)

Snapshot 8: Bezdan, Serbia – Birds on a wire – Nikola Johnny Mirkovic (Unsplash)

Snapshot 9: Petrovaradin, Serbia – Droned – Paddy Walker (Unsplash)

Snapshot 10: Belgrade, Serbia – Contemplate – Marija Zaric (Unsplash)

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes

Alencar, Joana. Lack of Social Trust – Brazil. January 2019.

Baccino, Alejandra. Polarization within Ourselves – South America. January 2019.

Cordido, Veronica. Hanging by Extremes – Venezuela. January 2019.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Extremism Is Now the New Hype? – Spain. February 2019

Montano, Osvaldo. Progress in the Face of Polarization – Bolivia. February 2019.

Romano, Mavi. Censorship and Cultural Survival in a World without Gods – Spain. January 2019.

Sariñana, Alejandra Gonzalez. Student Movements – Mexico. March 2019.

Sepi, Andreea. A World of Victims and Perpetrators? – Germany and Romania. February 2019.

Sevunts, Nane. The Era To Close – Armenia. March 2019.

Sitorus, Rina. Polarization in Politics: All a Cebong or Kampret – Indonesia. March 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Walls and Resettlement – South Africa and Angola. February 2019.

Forthcoming

CW 13 – Peru – Monica Valenzuela
CW 14 – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Aleksandar Skobic
CW 15 – Argentina – Julieta Spirito
CW 16 – Italy – Mary Ranaldo
CW 17 – Lebanon – Ghadir Younes
CW 18 – Cuba – Marilin Guerrero Casas
CW 19 – Ukraine – Evgeny Bondarenko
CW 20 – Uruguay – Andrea da Silva Escandell
CW 21 – Spain – Jazz Williams
CW 22 – Armenia – Mania Israyelyan
CW 23 – Poland – Pawel Awdejuk
CW 24 – Balkans – Aleksandar Protic
CW 25 – Italy – Daniela Cannarella
CW 26 – Serbia – Jelena Sekulic
CW 27 – Tajikistan – Nigina Kanunova
CW 28 – Portugal – Nuno Rosalino
CW 29 – Uruguay – Lillian Julber
CW 30 – Argentina – Javier Gomez
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Nane Sevunts

Me

I am Davit. I am 13 years old. I live in a shelter in Giumry, an Armenian town. I have 2 brothers and 2 sisters. They are younger than me. I need to work to feed them.

This is my mom. Her name is Shogher. She is sick. She can’t work so I have to work to take care of her.

I get up at 5 o’clock and go out to clean the yards. I work as a janitor from 5 am to 7 am. Sometimes it is cold outside, and my hands are freezing, but I am happy I can work.

Then I go to school on some days when we have food. If we don’t have food, I go to find wood in the forest to sell to my neighbors so that I can buy bread.

I want to become an astronaut. But first, I need to feed my family.

Yerevan, Armenia – Waiting – Ruslan Harutyunov

Him

This is Edgar. He is an oligarch. He has 10 cars and 5 houses. Edgar is a businessman. He does not need to work every day. Other people work for him.

When I pass by his house, I think something is wrong in this world. The shelter that I live in is made of metal, and he lives in a big concrete house that resembles a museum. I could never understand why they need the house to be so big. But that’s me. Perhaps they do.

When I become an astronaut, I want to take a picture of our Planet Earth from the sky. I want this picture to show all the shelters made of metal where children like my siblings freeze without a heating system and the museum-like houses where they throw away a quantity of food that would be enough for my family to survive for a year.

Armenia – Portrait 5 – Chubykin Arkady

I want this picture to show Edgar in his black super nice car and me sweeping the yards outside at -30 degrees Celsius in winter.

I want this picture to show all the kids like me that can’t go to school every day because they have to work for food and all the rich people like Edgar that don’t need to work for their bread.

I would call this picture ”Survival and Affluence”.

I am 13. I don’t understand a lot of things in this life. But I have a sense that something is wrong on our Planet Earth. I think we shouldn’t starve…

Fioletovo, Armenia – Do you understand? – Kirill Skorobogatko

Poverty in Armenia

According to data in 2016, 29.4% or 880,000 people are officially considered poor. This means that one out of three people is poor. A person is considered poor if he or she spends less than USD 88 per month, very poor if he or she spends less than USD 72 and extremely poor if he or she spends up to USD 50.

Among the poor people, women and children are especially vulnerable. As of 2016, 2.0% of children under the age of 18 live in extreme poverty, and 34.2% live in poverty. The families that live below the poverty line have both heating and malnutrition problems. These issues are especially acute in single mother families and families with more than 3 children.

Armenia – Portrait 2 – Emena

Shade of Light

In April-May, 2018, a revolution swept through Armenia. People did not want to see any more Davits and Edgars in society. They stood up to the injustice of the system and said ”NO” to those who were sponsoring these unfair relationships.

The tidal wave of revolution engulfed everything on its way, giving hope to people that one day when Davit will become an astronaut, he will not have poor shelters and luxury villas to photograph. He will see a more equal life on Planet Earth where people divide the resources fairly.

The wave of revolution was the answer to the injustice that had been sustained in Armenia for so long under the regime of the former government. Thousands of children like Davit had to work to support their families. Thousands of mothers like Davit’s mother were sick and could not buy medication or basic food. We want this era to end.

Yerevan, Armenia – A change – LMspencer

I don’t mean that poverty will be swept away immediately. We will have people struggling to survive for a long time. But the new wave gave hope to the people that it is not going to be the same anymore. We look into the future with the hope that one day we will have a social state where the government will assist those who cannot support themselves. We look into the future with the hope that the government will be willing and able to support vulnerable people and that the elderly, the single mothers, the children, the disabled and the sick will not be left on their own without any assistance or care. We do hope that such a day will come and we will be witnesses to these changes.

Today probably Davit still works as a janitor in the streets. But we can see the light at the end of the tunnel. We can see Davit getting his education and becoming an astronaut. Even with the slightest hope in our heart, we are stronger. We will fight for Davit. Each citizen of the Republic of Armenia is the mother and the sister and the brother of Davit. You are not alone, little boy. We are here to back you with all the love and wisdom of our hearts.

Nane Sevunts

Works Cited

Ampop News Portal, ”Poverty in Armenia”, May 5, 2018: https://ampop.am/poverty-in-armenia/

Woman and Society Information Analytical Portal, ”The face of poverty”, http://womennet.am/poverty-face-in-armenia/

Credits

Snapshot 1: Armenia – On the canal – Vahan Abrahamyan (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 2: Yerevan, Armenia – Waiting – Ruslan Harutyunov (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 3: Armenia – Portrait 5 – Chubykin Arkady (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 4: Fioletovo, Armenia – Do you understand? – Kirill Skorobogatko (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 5: Armenia – Portrait 2 – Emena (Shutterstock)

Snapshot 6: Yerevan, Armenia – A change – LMspencer (Shutterstock)

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes

Alencar, Joana. Lack of Social Trust – Brazil. January 2019.

Baccino, Alejandra. Polarization within Ourselves – South America. January 2019.

Cordido, Veronica. Hanging by Extremes – Venezuela. January 2019.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Extremism Is Now the New Hype? – Spain. February 2019

Montano, Osvaldo. Progress in the Face of Polarization – Bolivia. February 2019.

Romano, Mavi. Censorship and Cultural Survival in a World without Gods – Spain. January 2019.

Sariñana, Alejandra Gonzalez. Student Movements – Mexico. March 2019.

Sepi, Andreea. A World of Victims and Perpetrators? – Germany and Romania. February 2019.

Sitorus, Rina. Polarization in Politics: All a Cebong or Kampret – Indonesia. March 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Walls and Resettlement – South Africa and Angola. February 2019.

Forthcoming

CW 12 – Serbia – Vuka Mijuskovic
CW 13 – Peru – Monica Valenzuela
CW 14 – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Aleksandar Skobic
CW 15 – Argentina – Julieta Spirito
CW 16 – Italy – Mary Ranaldo
CW 17 – Lebanon – Ghadir Younes
CW 18 – Cuba – Marilin Guerrero Casas
CW 19 – Ukraine – Evgeny Bondarenko
CW 20 – Uruguay – Andrea da Silva Escandell
CW 21 – Spain – Jazz Williams
CW 22 – Armenia – Mania Israyelyan
CW 23 – Poland – Pawel Awdejuk
CW 24 – Balkans – Aleksandar Protic
CW 25 – Italy – Daniela Cannarella
CW 26 – Serbia – Jelena Sekulic
CW 27 – Tajikistan – Nigina Kanunova
CW 28 – Portugal – Nuno Rosalino
CW 29 – Uruguay – Lillian Julber
CW 30 – Argentina – Javier Gomez
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Alejandra Gonzalez Sariñana

Social movements have always divided public opinion, with strong ideas and passion accompanying supporters and their opponents. Sadly, there are political actors who know how to exploit this polarization for their own agendas. I believe that every social movement has two independent factors: one is the original demand, and the other is the actions taken in order to mobilize that demand. Demands are, for the most part, defended by people who believe in them, but the actions they take are sometimes directed by external interests that manipulate them for political reasons. Student movements are a good example because young people who are full of hope, energy and new ideas clash with the establishment, older generations and preset ideas. Student movements always polarize public feelings, and they are an easy target for political manipulation. In Mexico, we have lived through several important student movements, and it amazes me how the same movement can be experienced in completely different ways by different people. Students can be for or against the cause, they can also agree with the cause and disagree with the actions; people affected by their actions will most likely be annoyed, even if they support the student’s demands; people who are not affected might remain indifferent or become involved; while authorities might seek to benefit themselves either by provoking or repressing certain actions. Of course, the social context also affects the way a social movement is received by the general population, and maybe that is why the most important student movement in Mexico happened in the 1960s.

Mexico City, Mexico – Commemoration of the 1968 Tlatelolco massacre – Eduardo Guevara

2018 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the “matanza de Tlatelolco”. On October 2nd, 1968 the government of the then president, Gustavo Diaz Ordaz, ordered military action against members of the student movement gathered in a public square. Hundreds of students were shot from surrounding buildings while they held a public meeting. This happened only three days before the opening ceremony for the 1968 Olympic Games. The student movement started as part of (and a consequence of), generalized social and political movements throughout the world in that decade. Their primary issue was the use of excessive police force against students after an event that involved a brawl between members of the two main public universities in Mexico: UNAM and IPN. I had not been born yet, but I have heard stories involving members of different sectors of society that lived through it and that experienced it with totally different views. First, as a student in the National University, I heard stories from students at that time (now teachers) who defended the movement and remembered it as being fair and necessary. They hold the government completely accountable for the horrible end. Second, my mother; she was not a student, she was 27 years old and working in a hotel and remembers the pressure they were under because of the up-coming Olympic Games and how they thought the student movement might affect it and the economic loss it implied. Lastly, my husband, who was only 7 at the time. Many children like him remember being picked up at school by their panicked parents because “the students were coming” and kept at home for several days in fear of “the students”.

Mexico City, Mexico – Gathering to protest – Freda Bouskoutas

In 1999 I had the opportunity to experience a student movement in the flesh: I was in my fourth year of architecture school in the National University (UNAM). It began with the authority’s proposal to introduce new fees, and all hell broke loose. Opinions where divided from the start: some defended the State’s obligation to provide free education as a right for everyone; others agreed that most of the students could afford to pay something for their education (the amount to be paid was a symbolic and voluntary 20 cents per semester). Protest began in every school, groups started to get organized and held assemblies to discuss actions to be taken. It is important to mention that there had been two previous attempts to impose a fee structure, one in the 70s and one in the 80s. Both triggered the same course of events: general protests, student strikes and polarization. We must then question the timing of this new proposal. 2000 was an election year, so in 1999 campaigns were already underway. The governing party was down in the polls as well as in popularity, the main opposition party was looking to finally defeat them after seventy years in power. It was well known in the university that the opposition party was endorsing some of the leaders of the student movement, some of them even moved on to jobs within the system. The student strike in 1999 lasted for almost a year; many students left school and went off to finish their studies somewhere else; companies started putting “no UNAM” policies on their job offers; many people wanted actions to be taken for the strike to end, even by force, while others defended the student’s right to protest. Finally, in February 2000, police entered the university campus and put an end to the strike. But an end to the strike does not mean an end to the problem, or to the differences within the community.

Mexico City, Mexico – Downtown – Alex Cimbal

History has a way of repeating itself. It was now 2018 and Mexico was again in an important political moment. We had an election in July, and there was a change in the ruling party in December. So, it might not be a coincidence that a new student movement formed. It started as a protest against violence in and outside of the various campuses (several students had been killed or raped without any actions being taken to find and punish the culprits). Students from one of the schools organized a protest in front of the university president’s office; they were confronted by a group of “students” called “Porros”, whom are rumored to have been paid by someone to provoke. Just as in 1968, a student movement was ignited by someone, probably with a political agenda or simply to destabilize the country before the new president could be sworn in. This time, however, everyone agreed that the students had a just cause and that security issues must be addressed, not only inside the university, but throughout the entire country. What seems to divide the community is the way these goals can be achieved. Some believe that striking and closing schools is the only way to pressure the authorities into acting, while others do not think that missing classes helps in any way. This polarization causes a clear division between those who support the movement’s actions, and those who are against them. Even within schools, division is apparent, and thus, the student movement does not present a united front.

Mexico City, Mexico – Biblioteca Vasconcelos – R.M. Nunes

But, who wins when a student movement is ignited? Can the students win? I recently asked one of the participants in the movement if they ever question who is behind the events that lead to protests and strikes, and what their political agenda really is. He answered that he does, but only in conversations with his friends, not in the open meetings. In the end, he says, it doesn’t matter, as long as the main issue gets resolved and actions are taken to create a safe environment for the community, he doesn’t care if somebody gains political power or leverage. I guess it’s true, even if social movements are used to polarize society and push political agendas forward, the underlying issues that give rise to them should not be forgotten. Those issues are real, as they have been real every time, and, yes, they divide opinions and they are used by politicians, but they are important.

Alejandra Gonzalez Sariñana

Credits

Photo 1: Guadalajara, Mexico – The mirror of what? – Francisco J Ramos Gallego (Shutterstock)

Photo 2: Mexico City, Mexico – Commemoration of the 1968 Tlatelolco massacre – Eduardo Guevara (Shutterstock)

Photo 3: Mexico City, Mexico – Gathering to protest – Freda Bouskoutas (Shutterstock)

Photo 4: Mexico City, Mexico – Downtown – Alex Cimbal (Shutterstock)

Photo 5: Mexico City, Mexico – Biblioteca Vasconcelos – R.M. Nunes (Shutterstock)

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes

Alencar, Joana. Lack of Social Trust – Brazil. January 2019.

Baccino, Alejandra. Polarization within Ourselves – South America. January 2019.

Cordido, Veronica. Hanging by Extremes – Venezuela. January 2019.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Extremism Is Now the New Hype? – Spain. February 2019

Montano, Osvaldo. Progress in the Face of Polarization – Bolivia. February 2019.

Romano, Mavi. Censorship and Cultural Survival in a World without Gods – Spain. January 2019.

Sepi, Andreea. A World of Victims and Perpetrators? – Germany and Romania. February 2019.

Sitorus, Rina. Polarization in Politics: All a Cebong or Kampret – Indonesia. March 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Walls and Resettlement – South Africa and Angola. February 2019.

Forthcoming

CW 11 – Armenia – Armine Asryan
CW 12 – Serbia – Vuka Mijuskovic
CW 13 – Peru – Monica Valenzuela
CW 14 – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Aleksandar Skobic
CW 15 – Argentina – Julieta Spirito
CW 16 – Italy – Mary Ranaldo
CW 17 – Lebanon – Ghadir Younes
CW 18 – Cuba – Marilin Guerrero Casas
CW 19 – Ukraine – Evgeny Bondarenko
CW 20 – Uruguay – Andrea da Silva Escandell
CW 21 – Spain – Jazz Williams
CW 22 – Armenia – Mania Israyelyan
CW 23 – Poland – Pawel Awdejuk
CW 24 – Balkans – Aleksandar Protic
CW 25 – Italy – Daniela Cannarella
CW 26 – Serbia – Jelena Sekulic
CW 27 – Tajikistan – Nigina Kanunova
CW 28 – Portugal – Nuno Rosalino
CW 29 – Uruguay – Lillian Julber
CW 30 – Argentina – Javier Gomez
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Rina Sitorus

These days, it is hard to separate polarisasi politik from the everyday life of Indonesian citizens. This phenomenon – having a personal and emotionally charged negative feeling about those in the other political camp has risen sharply before the upcoming presidential election in April 2019. People experience it every day, from conservative media, social media, to Friday speeches in the mosques, school announcements, and the biggest and most important “platform” of polarisasi politik nowadays: WhatsApp groups. It shows that people in homogenous communities grow more certain of their political ideas and beliefs, causing them to become extreme. Campaigns by both parties on both conventional and social media just amplify this.

Bandung, Indonesia – Downtown – Ikhsan Assidiqie

The tale of two films

If you think that polarisasi politik is only about debates and speeches on television, and all those campaigns by the two official presidential candidates (President Joko Widodo and his contender Prabowo Subianto), think again. People can get a taste of polarisasi politik from these two biopic films: A Man Called Ahok (AMCA) and Hanum and Rangga. Released on the same day, to me personally, this is the best example of how polarized Indonesian politics is these days.

Bandung, Indonesia – Shopping – Fikri Rasyid

A Man Called Ahok (AMCA) tells the story of the childhood of former Jakarta Governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama (Ahok), while Hanum and Rangga is a love story about the relationship between Hanum Rais and her husband Rangga Almahendra. To make things interesting, Hanum is the daughter of Amien Rais, one of the driving forces behind the mob that successfully demanded Ahok (who is widely known as a strong ally of President Joko Widodo) be put in jail for blasphemy. Hanum Rais herself is a prominent member of her father’s party Partai Amanat Nasional (PAN), a faithful supporter of Prabowo Subianto.

The heated discussions – mostly having nothing to do with the production aspects of either film – are not only happening in social media, but extend all the way to IMDB. Rumor has it that it is mandatory for PAN’s supporters to go see A Man Called Ahok, with the AMCA team giving away free tickets for people to boost the audience figures. The rating for A Man Called Ahok on IMDB is 9, 2 while for Hanum and Rangga it is 1, 2 (ouch). As somebody with an open mind, you probably realize that the reviews might not come from a totally unbiased audience, but you can see this is how far the polarisasi politik has gone in Indonesia.

Bandung, Indonesia – On the street – Fikri Rasyid

What is actually happening?

Experts say that the polarisasi politik happening in Indonesia is due to the aftermath of the 2014 presidential election. This trend continued in the Jakarta gubernatorial election in 2017, where identity politics were used to gain votes.

It’s no secret that the tensions in the 2019 election are already heating up in Indonesia. This is the second time Jokowi and Prabowo are competing against each other and all signs are pointing to an even rougher campaign.

Prabowo’s supporters call Jokowi’s supporters liars and infidels, while Jokowi’s fans stamp Prabowo’s supporters as a bunch of fascists and extremists with low IQs.

Bali, Indonesia – In the shade – Johan Mouchet

Indonesians – creative as ever with their words – even have two unofficially official names for these two extremes: cebong (Jokowi’s pet tadpole) for Jokowi’s supporters and kampret (a derogatory reference to bats) for Prabowo’s.

Most cebongs are also loyal supporters of Ahok, and they are the same people who oppose the idea of Islamic values (Sariah) dominating public policy and daily life.

Meanwhile, kamprets are those who support Prabowo (mostly since 2014) and tend to actively join the massive anti-Ahok rallies and loudly claim that Jokowi hates Islam.

Surabaya, Indonesia – Waiting – Niko Lienata

Academics have concluded that there are three things that can be identified as the causes of polarisasi politik: difference in the empathy target, difference in phenomenon attribution and difference in a person’s moral values. When you look at Indonesian demographics, especially with the large social and economic divergences, it is no wonder that identity politics is popular. People can’t help but identify with a (bigger) group who they trust shares the same beliefs and defends their (personal) interests. The presidential election in Indonesia is no longer a contest between two candidates and their coalitions, but also a competition between two ideologies: a large Islamic coalition on one side and a nationalist secularist Islam and non-Islam on the other.

In the Indonesian political world today, the narrative seems to be: if you are on Jokowi’s side then you are anti-Islam, if you are on Prabowo’s, then you are an extremist.

Bandung, Indonesia – Take a look – Ali Yahya

Is it always bad?

One thing you can’t deny is that polarisasi politik triggers people’s curiosity and it motivates them to gather more information about their candidate. In today’s world, social media and group chats have made this information easy to obtain. With a few clicks, people can follow a conversation about politics via trending topics and comment sections.

The latest study reports that polarisasi stimulates people’s participation in politics. Alan Abramowitz (a professor of political science at Emory University) argues that polarization engages the public and increases participation in the electoral process. It has been noted in Indonesia that the number of voters who made use of their right to vote in the 2014 presidential election reached 70%. Not to mention that in the Jakarta gubernatorial election in 2014, voter turnout reached 70%, compared to 66.7% in 2012.

Jakarta, Indonesia – Women only car – Georgina Captures

Polarisasi politik also motivates people to actively monitor the work of the government – with their own reasons, mind you – but nevertheless they are actively involved in the political process. The government is then required to be more transparent and accountable. In the period before the upcoming presidential election in 2019, the candidates (at least the ones with a good head on their shoulders) will also feel the urge to do the same with their campaigns and promises.

It seems logical that polarisasi politik could strengthen democracy if both sides would just stop using identity politics and negative campaigning to attack their rivals. It also seems logical that polarisasi politik would benefit democracy if people were to first check the authenticity of news or a story before sharing it on social media or in group chats. But the thing is, when you have decided to support one side no matter what, your heart has already decided that for you, and I’m afraid there’s not much room left for logic.

Rina Sitorus

Credits

Photo 1: Borobudur, Indonesia – Mountain fog – Sebastian Staines (Shutterstock)

Photo 2: Bandung, Indonesia – Downtown – Ikhsan Assidiqie (Unsplash)

Photo 3: Bandung, Indonesia – Shopping – Fikri Rasyid (Unsplash)

Photo 4: Bandung, Indonesia – On the street – Fikri Rasyid (Unsplash)

Photo 5: Bali, Indonesia – In the shade – Johan Mouchet (Unsplash)

Photo 6: Surabaya, Indonesia – Waiting – Niko Lienata (Unsplash)

Photo 7: Bandung, Indonesia – Take a look – Ali Yahya (Unsplash)

Photo 8: Jakarta, Indonesia – Women only car – Georgina Captures (Shutterstock)

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes

Alencar, Joana. Lack of Social Trust – Brazil. January 2019.

Baccino, Alejandra. Polarization within Ourselves – South America. January 2019.

Cordido, Veronica. Hanging by Extremes – Venezuela. January 2019.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Extremism Is Now the New Hype? – Spain. February 2019

Montano, Osvaldo. Progress in the Face of Polarization – Bolivia. February 2019.

Romano, Mavi. Censorship and Cultural Survival in a World without Gods – Spain. January 2019.

Sepi, Andreea. A World of Victims and Perpetrators? – Germany and Romania. February 2019.

Wallis, Toni. Walls and Resettlement – South Africa and Angola. February 2019.

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Alencar, Joana. Uncertainty – Our Spirit – Brazil. November 2018.

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Husaini, Maha. Inshallah – Jordan. December 2018

Israyelyan, Mania. 30 Years of Anoroshutyun – Armenia. December 2018.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamorphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Kingsley, Anastasia. Expect the Unexpected. November 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Marti, Sol. A Thought Falling – Spain and Germany. December 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Ray, Sanjay Kumar. Once upon a Time in a Queue – India. November 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sariñana, Alejandra González. A Brighter Future? – Mexico. December 2018.

Skobic, Aleksandar. Genetic Code Name: Unique – Bosnia and Herzegovina. December 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sevunts, Nane. From Uncertainty to Newness. November 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

The Anthology of Global Instability

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Forthcoming

CW 10 – Mexico – Alejandra Gonzalez Sarinana
CW 11 – Armenia – Armine Asryan
CW 12 – Serbia – Vuka Mijuskovic
CW 13 – Peru – Monica Valenzuela
CW 14 – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Aleksandar Skobic
CW 15 – Argentina – Julieta Spirito
CW 16 – Italy – Mary Ranaldo
CW 17 – Lebanon – Ghadir Younes
CW 18 – Cuba – Marilin Guerrero Casas
CW 19 – Ukraine – Evgeny Bondarenko
CW 20 – Uruguay – Andrea da Silva Escandell
CW 21 – Spain – Jazz Williams
CW 22 – Armenia – Mania Israyelyan
CW 23 – Poland – Pawel Awdejuk
CW 24 – Balkans – Aleksandar Protic
CW 25 – Italy – Daniela Cannarella
CW 26 – Serbia – Jelena Sekulic
CW 27 – Tajikistan – Nigina Kanunova
CW 28 – Portugal – Nuno Rosalino
CW 29 – Uruguay – Lillian Julber
CW 30 – Argentina – Javier Gomez
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Jonay Quintero Hernandez

“Extremes meet” – this little piece of popular wisdom may come in handy more often than not in many a conversation today. Everyone seems to be ready not only to give their own opinion (regardless of whether it has been asked for or not), but to defend it down to the last bullet. Very often a simple suggestion is responded to with an outburst of emotional arguing rather than with a logical response related to the original statement.

If all this happens in private, daily life in interactions with classmates, colleagues, relatives or passers-by in a pub, what happens in the international geopolitical scene? Just a few examples, though not necessarily innovative ones: the Brexit “thing”, pro-independence claims in Catalonia, populism and neofascism in western Europe, ISIS and other religious extremists, and the Trump administration, among others.

Barcelona, Spain – La Sagrada Familia – Claudio Testa

However, the savvy reader might have been thinking at this point: “But extremism is all about terrorist attacks and the like, isn’t it?” Well, according to the UK’s Counter Extremism Strategy of 2015, the definition of extremism would be something like: “…[] the vocal or active opposition to our fundamental values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and respect and tolerance for different faiths and beliefs. We also regard calls for the death of members of our armed forces as extremist.” So, if someone goes against “our fundamental values”, or threatens respect or tolerance, they are being an “extremist”. But the question is do we all, not only as countries, but as individuals, respect the other’s rules and values? Are we really so tolerant?

Millennials are said to be, by far, the most oversensitive generation ever and it is very interesting to consider whether there is some truth in this claim. The current generation has grown up in an over protective environment in which the individual is said to be “special”, “different”, and therefore, why should the slightest discrepancy be allowed, especially if it questions your values or hurts your feelings? You are the “special” one.

Torrox, Spain – Sheltered – Hector Martinez

Allegedly, younger generations have greater concerns about social or environmental issues than previous ones. That’s cool. But being brought up in the notion of their own uniqueness, many youngsters, apparently seem to care about those issues but, especially when they affect them, there is a certain tendency to overreact to the offenses. It is very hard to live if you take offense at the slightest criticism that you receive.

There seems to be a dictatorship of the “politically correct”, a constant exaggeration of inclusive language or a fundamentalist preaching of gender ideology. All of these tendencies can be in themselves “extremist” as they take values originally considered to be positive too far. As they fall into exaggeration, these values get diverted from the purpose they were originally designed for. One of the most famous cases took place when Netflix began broadcasting the classic TV series “Friends”, which enjoyed great success when aired for the first time almost 30 years ago. The new audiences considered the series to be homophobic, misogynist and contrary to LGTB rights. Particularly controversial was the episode in which Ross’s lesbian ex-wife marries her partner; many of the jokes about their sexual choice angered the youngest Netflix audience.

Barcelona, Spain – Is there another option – John Fornander

The fact that at that time everyone laughed at that kind of humor may be arguable, but the real point is that not a soul thought by any means, at that time, that silly jokes of this sort could be offensive to anyone. No one would have thought this to be such a big deal back then. That being said, is it that we all were brutally homophobic at that time? Or is Gen Y overreacting to this issue? This is just one example. The fact is that increasingly more experts on psychology and sociology are beginning to suggest the latter. And this is again where we see the “snowflake” phenomenon mentioned above: if you are “special” yourself, your feelings are more important than anybody else’s, your views matter more than anyone else’s… indirectly you are two inches above the rest of mankind.

This is at the heart of extremism because if you take offence so easily and your reactions are so violent (critics, please check any comments section of youtube, Twitter or any other social network), then you are surely provoking an at least, equal reaction in your counterpart. Everybody seems to believe they have the right to pontificate on any subject, no matter how complex it might be. There is a serious danger in believing that mind-bending, long-lasting problems may have simple, straightforward solutions. Here is where the “bad guys” come into play. The populists, nationalist, or just simply professional manipulators that try to gain some sort of profit from general uncertainty or social unrest.

Tocon, Spain – The light chain – Mariano Nocetti

The media are particularly relevant in this issue. They seem to have dropped independence, neutrality, objectivity or simply essential ethics long ago. Taking Spain as an example – although it seems to be a general tendency everywhere – there are no “normal journalists” any more. You only get left-wing journalists and media or right-wing journalist and media. “Wisdom is always in the right middle,” Aristotle said, but that does not seem to apply any more. When we hear these journalists’ mean, selfish, one-sided, if not simply false reporting, we feel like we are being transported to our darkest past.

Obviously, there had to be consequences sooner or later. The surge in populist parties like Podemos or CUP, independentism (we always had a little bit of this though) and, worst of all, the appearance of a far-right party, for the first time in more than forty years, are due to this two-sided phenomenon of extremism-polarization. One could have thought that Falange, the Franco regime’s party, would become this strong far right party at some point, but that does not happen to be the case. National Catholicism is difficult to market in a time in which fewer and fewer people seem to care about religion in western countries. There is a renewed, “fresh” and “normal guy looking” for this new version of fascism, which is called VOX, and he succeeded in gathering an audience of 10,000 at Vistalegre Arena in Madrid. This audience is “massive” for the social standards of a “leftie” country like Spain and no far right party had managed to achieve this in the last forty years.

Marbella, Spain – It’s fun – Quino Al

Their ideology can be quickly summarized in “Spain for Spaniards” (immigrant deportations), the abolition of Autonomous Communities (centralization of the country) and “Make Spain Great Again”… whatever… Doesn’t it sound familiar to you? Old imperial nations such as Austria, Germany, the UK or Spain are especially vulnerable to this kind of “ideology”, but this delusional return to a “brighter past” is even triumphing in smaller nations. Otherwise you couldn’t explain the success of such bizarre characters as Orban, Farage, Le Pen or the Kaczýnskis.

When you surf the Internet, open a newspaper, listen to the radio or watch TV it really feels like we are in the 30s again. Watch out. Most people who lived during that time are long gone now, so what happened in those years has become a “not so serious” account performed by Hollywood, the History Channel and history books. Finally, as most educational systems in Western Europe have abandoned humanistic disciplines, this creates the perfect background for a new surge in these dark ideologies of the past. The effects of fascism and communism are a foreign experience for most millennials, who are at risk of repeating more than just an environment of polarization and extremes.

Jonay Quintero Hernandez

Credits

Photo 1: Caldes de Montbui, Spain – Green – David Monje (Unsplash)

Photo 2: Barcelona, Spain – La Sagrada Familia – Claudio Testa (Unsplash)

Photo 3: Torrox, Spain – Sheltered – Hector Martinez (Unsplash)

Photo 4: Barcelona, Spain – Is there another option – John Fornander (Unsplash)

Photo 5: Tocon, Spain – The light chain – Mariano Nocetti (Unsplash)

Photo 6: Marbella, Spain – It’s fun – Quino Al (Unsplash)

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes

Alencar, Joana. Lack of Social Trust – Brazil. January 2019.

Baccino, Alejandra. Polarization within Ourselves – South America. January 2019.

Cordido, Veronica. Hanging by Extremes – Venezuela. January 2019.

Montano, Osvaldo. Progress in the Face of Polarization – Bolivia. February 2019.

Romano, Mavi. Censorship and Cultural Survival in a World without Gods – Spain. January 2019.

Sepi, Andreea. A World of Victims and Perpetrators? – Germany and Romania. February 2019.

Wallis, Toni. Walls and Resettlement – South Africa and Angola. February 2019.

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Alencar, Joana. Uncertainty – Our Spirit – Brazil. November 2018.

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Husaini, Maha. Inshallah – Jordan. December 2018

Israyelyan, Mania. 30 Years of Anoroshutyun – Armenia. December 2018.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamorphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Kingsley, Anastasia. Expect the Unexpected. November 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Marti, Sol. A Thought Falling – Spain and Germany. December 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Ray, Sanjay Kumar. Once upon a Time in a Queue – India. November 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sariñana, Alejandra González. A Brighter Future? – Mexico. December 2018.

Skobic, Aleksandar. Genetic Code Name: Unique – Bosnia and Herzegovina. December 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sevunts, Nane. From Uncertainty to Newness. November 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

The Anthology of Global Instability

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Forthcoming

CW 9 – Indonesia – Rina Sitorus
CW 10 – Mexico – Alejandra Gonzalez Sarinana
CW 11 – Armenia – Armine Asryan
CW 12 – Serbia – Vuka Mijuskovic
CW 13 – Peru – Monica Valenzuela
CW 14 – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Aleksandar Skobic
CW 15 – Argentina – Julieta Spirito
CW 16 – Italy – Mary Ranaldo
CW 17 – Lebanon – Ghadir Younes
CW 18 – Cuba – Marilin Guerrero Casas
CW 19 – Ukraine – Evgeny Bondarenko
CW 20 – Uruguay – Andrea da Silva Escandell
CW 21 – Spain – Jazz Williams
CW 22 – Armenia – Mania Israyelyan
CW 23 – Poland – Pawel Awdejuk
CW 24 – Balkans – Aleksandar Protic
CW 25 – Italy – Daniela Cannarella
CW 26 – Serbia – Jelena Sekulic
CW 27 – Tajikistan – Nigina Kanunova
CW 28 – Portugal – Nuno Rosalino
CW 29 – Uruguay – Lillian Julber
CW 30 – Argentina – Javier Gomez
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Osvaldo Montano

It has been 9 years since Bolivia’s Constitutional Referendum was held in 2009. This event made us first perceive the political polarization in the country and revealed sharp differences between the regions, highlighting a country divided by social class, region and political party. These dynamics, however, are due more to current than historical differences between the regions. Rural people who identify as indigenous have backed the presidency of Evo Morales in the departments of La Paz, Oruro and Potosí, while people in the rest of the country make up the opposition.

La Paz, Bolivia – The cityscape at night – Geziel Esteban

When making a decision, society reveals the bias that exists in the different social classes. In the countryside there is almost unconditional support for Evo Morales; the government support in rural areas is strengthened by all the spending that has benefited them: the construction of hospitals, schools, markets, roads and other facilities. Furthermore, the party is connected with and has supported the coca leaf producers. On the other hand, in the cities, one feels opposition to the government for racial and political motives. The history of blockades and social upheaval with which their political life began spurs this sentiment, along with the sale of strategic government companies to foreign corporations, such as National Security, whether for laudable reasons or not.

La Paz, Boliva – The cityscape – Tobias Jelskov

The government of Evo Morales has achieved profound changes in the current environment of Bolivia, despite the global crisis in 2008, which hardly affected the country. The re-negotiation of the price of gas at that time along with cuts in government spending and salaries of government employees have generated growth and surpluses never seen before in the country. On the contrary, investment errors have given the opposition the opportunity to raise failures as a political flag.

The opposition’s political strategy to use the media and internet in 2016 changed the public’s general feeling about the presidency of Evo Morales, distorting his mandate and presenting personal problems. This created uncertainty and also brought to light deeper problems of corruption and theft in his administration. As a result, the ruling party lost popular support, and people’s general opinion of the administration deteriorated, undermining the president’s image.

Copocabana, Bolivia – Tucked in – Sunny Upadhyay

The political reality in Bolivia has revealed a divided opposition without a clear leader, where self-interests have distorted the main figures in the political parties. They have failed to present a clear proposal or focus on pointing out the errors of Evo Morales’s government, have provided poor information to the public and generated uncertainty.

This situation entails a murky future, where the ruling party and the opposition seek to distort each other’s positions and appeal to the citizen’s feelings, provoking them to take one side or the other without knowing the achievements or virtues. This reflects a culture with a great need for improvement, as all the political participants largely show that they put personal gains ahead of public services. A lot of this conflict has moved from the streets to the indomitable social networks.

La Paz, Bolivia – On the street – NiarKrad

There are those who do not recognize that we are experiencing a moment of polarization in Bolivia. This failure to understand the dynamics is superficial and does not take into account that we polarize from the moment we do not accept the values of the other side. This is seen more and more in the divided Bolivia of today, where there are only two options: Evo and not-Evo. This polarization can even reach the point of hatred and the desire to impose one’s views without being sensitive to the situation of the country.

These differences have revealed negative feelings about other social classes, creating tension that many hope will be resolved in the upcoming elections, either with the end of the Evo Morales government or his re-election. On the other hand, as a country, we hope and want to believe that the calm before the storm will continue, however many are certain that this will not be the case in Bolivia, due to the sole objective that each of us has to impose our own idea of what is right.

Santa Cruz, Bolivia – On the street – jjspring

The political uncertainty in Bolivia has generated a polarized environment, some sure that the presidency of Evo Morales will end in the next elections, either because it was determined in a referendum or because the constitution prohibits another term. However, others believe that Morales’s ability to authorize appointments to the Constitutional Court and amendments to the law governing political parties will allow him to run again. Both the opposition and the ruling party seek to damage the image of the other, revealing their true character in their actions. The opposition has been very vocal about political persecution, with any person who presents himself as a possible candidate opposed to Evo Morales being subjected to this persecution.

Samaipata, Bolivia – Looking – Pedro Henrique Santos

All these events bring us to the moment where we have to decide, sensing the extremism, without an analysis of the proposals of each party and the reality of the administration. We are just simply taking sides politically. Many people who seek to influence this feeling at all costs use traditional media and the internet, without hesitating to lie, falsify or hide information to change people’s personal opinion.

The future of Bolivia feels politically uncertain, but it is nothing like the past which was even more complex. Nowadays the power of the “memes”, depicting the partial and biased information of the public players, has shown that personal benefits take precedence over the public good in all social and political areas. The feeling of having to decide which is the least corrupt party leaves an aftertaste of conformity.

Uyuni, Bolivia – Silhouettes – Matan Levanon

It is clear that Bolivia as a country and its population has grown in the face of adversity and has changed for the better. Our culture continues to move towards a future where technology, social networks and tradition come together, hopefully with less polarization.

Osvaldo Montano

Credits

Photo 1: Uyuni, Bolivia – Salt flat – Matan Levanon (Unsplash)

Photo 2: La Paz, Bolivia – The cityscape at night – Geziel Esteban (Unsplash)

Photo 3: La Paz, Boliva – The cityscape – Tobias Jelskov (Unsplash)

Photo 4: Copocabana, Bolivia – Tucked in – Sunny Upadhyay (Unsplash)

Photo 5: La Paz, Bolivia – On the street – NiarKrad (Shutterstock)

Photo 6: Santa Cruz, Bolivia – On the street – jjspring (Shutterstock)

Photo 7: Samaipata, Bolivia – Looking – Pedro Henrique Santos (Unsplash)

Photo 8: Uyuni, Bolivia – Silhouettes – Matan Levanon (Unsplash)

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes

Alencar, Joana. Lack of Social Trust – Brazil. January 2019.

Baccino, Alejandra. Polarization within Ourselves – South America. January 2019.

Cordido, Veronica. Hanging by Extremes – Venezuela. January 2019.

Romano, Mavi. Censorship and Cultural Survival in a World without Gods – Spain. January 2019.

Sepi, Andreea. A World of Victims and Perpetrators? – Germany and Romania. February 2019.

Wallis, Toni. Walls and Resettlement – South Africa and Angola. February 2019.

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Alencar, Joana. Uncertainty – Our Spirit – Brazil. November 2018.

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Husaini, Maha. Inshallah – Jordan. December 2018

Israyelyan, Mania. 30 Years of Anoroshutyun – Armenia. December 2018.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamorphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Kingsley, Anastasia. Expect the Unexpected. November 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Marti, Sol. A Thought Falling – Spain and Germany. December 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Ray, Sanjay Kumar. Once upon a Time in a Queue – India. November 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sariñana, Alejandra González. A Brighter Future? – Mexico. December 2018.

Skobic, Aleksandar. Genetic Code Name: Unique – Bosnia and Herzegovina. December 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sevunts, Nane. From Uncertainty to Newness. November 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

The Anthology of Global Instability

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Forthcoming

CW 8 – Spain – Jonay Quintero Hernandez
CW 9 – Indonesia – Rina Sitorus
CW 10 – Mexico – Alejandra Gonzalez Sarinana
CW 11 – Armenia – Armine Asryan
CW 12 – Serbia – Vuka Mijuskovic
CW 13 – Peru – Monica Valenzuela
CW 14 – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Aleksandar Skobic
CW 15 – Argentina – Julieta Spirito
CW 16 – Italy – Mary Ranaldo
CW 17 – Lebanon – Ghadir Younes
CW 18 – Cuba – Marilin Guerrero Casas
CW 19 – Ukraine – Evgeny Bondarenko
CW 20 – Uruguay – Andrea da Silva Escandell
CW 21 – Spain – Jazz Williams
CW 22 – Armenia – Mania Israyelyan
CW 23 – Poland – Pawel Awdejuk
CW 24 – Balkans – Aleksandar Protic
CW 25 – Italy – Daniela Cannarella
CW 26 – Serbia – Jelena Sekulic
CW 27 – Tajikistan – Nigina Kanunova
CW 28 – Portugal – Nuno Rosalino
CW 29 – Uruguay – Lillian Julber
CW 30 – Argentina – Javier Gomez
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed