Emblem transpoзиция by Ahmed Samir

Our lives are teeming with uncertainties, whether in the field of professional work, raising children, social relations or elsewhere. The difficulty with uncertainty is that we do not know in advance what circumstances might occur when choosing an alternative, that is, we have no information about the likely possibilities for each alternative. In other words, the available information is minimal, making any prediction of the best results very challenging.

Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt – On the road

In the field of professional work, I seek to find a career that will let me achieve my goals and aspirations. I may move from one career to another if I am uncertain about whether this career is the one through which I can achieve my goals, even if I have gathered as much information as possible before starting a particular career. In addition, I will try to communicate with some people who practice the same profession and have real experience. I may even go beyond that and do my best to look for some specialized centers that offer courses for beginners who are interested in starting a particular career. I begin with courses that may address the theoretical and practical aspects in some detail. I try to study these aspects from an abstract point of view and follow the workshops with passion until my understanding is rounded out by absorbing the practical part that is most important.

Egypt – On the Nile – paulvinten

Despite all these actions I may have taken before starting a career, I still face the risk of uncertainty. Is this the right profession or is there another profession that is more appropriate? Will I achieve my goals in this profession with my degree or is there something better? Is my career development rate the desired one or not? If I am now the best employee in my department who always gets the highest ratings in the periodic employee evaluations of the organization, will another employee come to outperform me and have a head start? Will the organization change the evaluation criteria one day or will it remain the same?

Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt – Locals

If I talk about raising my children, the risk of uncertainty continues to chase me. I analyze the personalities of my children to know what development programs will suit them. I monitor their behavior from time to time and then develop a program for behavioral evaluation that takes into account the individual differences and the actual environment in which they live. The program also includes the methods of reward and punishment to achieve the best results. I also seek to discover their talents and skills in various ways and then prepare a practical plan to develop these talents and skills as well as focusing on their way of thinking and the development of intelligence. I also concentrate on the health aspect in terms of cleanliness and nutrition to maintain a healthy body. I even encourage them to engage in useful sports with follow up from my side. Moreover, I’m interested in spending some time with them to develop their emotional side and build a positive relationship with them through which I can influence and guide them effectively. I also follow their progress in education and offer the necessary support. However, I still confront uncertainty. For example, I may face an emergency that prevents me from continuing to implement the program of behavioral evaluation or the plan to discover and develop talents and skills. This may also prevent me from implementing these programs and plans in an ideal way, which may result in my children’s failure to achieve the required goals. There may be changes in reality around us, and the plans may become impossible to reconcile with these changes, or my children may be not able to keep up with the requirements of the future.

Luxor, Egypt – Renting bikes

In terms of social relations with others, there is also uncertainty. I make an effort to select my friends and seek to build strong and successful relationships with others whether they are friends, relatives or other members of society at large. To build these strong and successful relationships, I adopt multiple methods. I make others feel that they are important by offering them courtesy and focusing on their positive aspects. I also pick the right words for everyone and treat them gently. I do my best to be patient with opinions and ideas that I disagree with and accept others so that they feel relaxed when talking with me. And to reach the hearts of others, I use fun and optimism so that they come to me when they have a need and want my companionship. I am careful not to talk about myself unless the other side asks me to do so and I do not impose myself or my ideas on others. I also offer advice to others in a confidential and gentle manner that does not embarrass them.

Hurghada, Egypt – Pumping sewage

However, it is obvious that social relations are closely tied to the other party. If we assume that those who seek to build successful social relations have taken all possible steps to ensure that they achieve this, there is no guarantee for the other party or that they will be able to maintain, enhance, improve and strengthen this relationship. Hence, there is a threat of uncertainty.

Egypt – Getting a haircut

To summarize, it is difficult to overcome uncertainty because it is often related to future variables that we cannot accurately identify. A practical solution is to try to reduce the negative effects of uncertainty as much as possible through strategic planning that takes into account all the variables and incorporates continuously updated data so that all the developments are studied. Great importance should also be attached to the collection of information from multiple sources. Finally, the most likely outcome should be determined by examining each possibility and preparing the right solutions in advance.

Ahmed Samir

Postcard emblem at 1080

Credits

Photo 1: Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt – Sitting – asayenka

Photo 2: Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt – On the road – asayenka

Photo 3: Egypt – On the Nile – paulvinten

Photo 4: Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt – Locals – asayenka

Photo 5: Luxor, Egypt – Renting bikes – Paul Prescott

Photo 6: Hurghada, Egypt – Pumping sewage – Ai-kon

Photo 7: Egypt – Getting a haircut – paulvinten

Postcard emblem at 1080

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.org and www.transposing.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in France, Uruguay, Saudi-Arabia, Greece, Italy, Czech Republic, Cuba, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed at www.transposing.net

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Transposing emblem by Jonay Quintero

According to the Cambridge English Dictionary online the meaning of “uncertainty” is a situation in which something is not known or [it is] something that is not known or certain. An obvious emphasis is placed on the words “not known” and el concepto of “certain.” We, humans, all have a taste for safety and certainty about the facts, el futuro, and even, the past (we will look at this later). That is what we have been fighting for over the last 40,000 años. Getting up at 4:30 am to work on una parcela of land till sunset meant a vast improvement over having to face a mammoth in a group or on your own; working in a factory was another improvement en comparación to having to plow land; and working by sitting at a computer is an immense advance relative to all the later. Each of these phases was a step towards safety, comfort and some sort of certainty.

Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain – Looks nice

No doubt, we all like to know that nuestros salaries will be paid at the beginning of each month and someday we will be able to get a retirement pension. La generación de nuestros padres quite often held the same position for most of their working life; unfortunately, los trabajos fijos are no longer available for most of us certainty lovers. It is not una aspiración irrazonable to expect the swimming pool to be full before diving into it (unless you are a crazy, drunk, or a vacationer intending to practice balconing1), but those times are gone, se fueron,2 never to come back.

Garachico, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain – Stretching out

The adventurous ones will not miss them because uncertainty might be fearful, but is also the spice de la vida. La razón why some people prefer to remain in their comfort zones (trendy phrase nowadays) while others throw themselves blindly into the darkness of not knowing is un misterio that has remained unsolved since the beginning of times. Getting into the unknown is always scary but also liberating, seems like nothing else can go any worse when you are alone in la inmensidad del océano o space, or the job center queue… There is a certain strength in feeling alone and small like when you are in a desert or visit a foreign country on your own for the first time.

Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain – What do you think?

Muchas personas get hooked on that sensation, that discharge de adrenalina, and never manage to settle down again. They become wanderers. Just wonder for a second how it might have felt for the early explorers, navigators or adventurers that crossed an ocean, a desert or a jungle for the first time. They probably shivered in fear but moved ahead nonetheless. If it were not for people like them, we probably would never have come out of the cave.

Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain – Looks nice here too

Uncertainty about the future can be an important issue but not knowing about your past, your origins, must also be a source of muchos problemas actuales y mucha angustia. In this regard, I often noticed the urge many Americans have to know about their ancestors or genealogía, which led to the current hype surrounding the genetic tests that tell you, among other things, which ethnic groups correspond, in percentages, to the basic groups of genes that configure your genetic make-up. I admit now that I had many preconceptions about them in regard to this issue. It seemed to me that there was a whole load de racismo and old-fashioned pride behind this interest. As if they were all expecting to be descendants of Napoleon, el zar de Rusia, or some other figura importante, all of them white of course.

Firgas, Canary Islands, Spain – Stuck

But now I see it from una perspectiva diferente. I imagine that living in una sociedad tan diversa, that imposes a single culture on everyone but integrates nobody, where everybody is Afro-American, Irish-American, Polish-American, etc., must be frustrating to some degree. Everybody needs some kind of roots, knowing where they come from to gain at least una vaga idea of where the heck they should be heading. I understand them now…I swear to God that I understand them because I did one of those tests myself.

I guess that I have always been interested in history…but the point is that for reasons that are my sole business I did one of those tests. I am not a geneticist and not acquainted with the science behind it, but the aim of this test is to find out what your paternal and maternal haplogroups3 are, that is, en inglés simple, this test tells you what percentage of your genetic heritage is Eastern European, Asian or African, for example.

El Cotillo, Fuerteventura island, Spain – Music 

I am an isleño4 and was born en las Islas Canarias, a tiny archipiélago conquered by the crown of Castile in the XV century. The aborigines, of Berber or Amazigh5 origin, resisted los conquistadores europeos for 96 años in fierce wars that came to an end four años after the discovery of America. En la sociedad canaria today, there is un gran tabú tácito about your ethnic origins. The common belief is that los aborígenes were exterminated and nowadays isleños are descendants de los conquistadores españoles, and people consider themselves puramente blanca y europea. There is constant fear that if we admit otherwise, that will reinforce the claim of the king of Morocco who would take over the islands, force us all to become Muslims and we would go back to the Middle Ages.

Tenerife Candelaria, Canary Islands, Spain – Mansay Guanches

Call it what you like, but fear is the most irrational of feelings. Once I was told about una persona who tore off a whole page of an antique registry book on baptisms from a local church because that was the only evidence of their aborigine ancestors. Based on the genetic test, the specific haplogrupo de los aborígenes de las Islas Canarias is the U6b-c, the very same that appeared on my sheet with the results. According to it, I am 64% aborigine, 32% Spanish/Portuguese and a 4% Black African. Of course, I am aware that esta tecnología is not so precise at the moment and if I do tests from several other companies I will get diferentes porcentajes, but nonetheless, with this sheet in my hand, I did not feel inferior to anyone, nor superior to anyone either. It did not change much about mi vida although… I cried as I have not cried since I was a child… As to why… I’m uncertain.

Jonay Quintero

Postcard emblem at 1080

Endnotes

1. Anglicism of the Spanish word balcón, depicts the custom of many young tourists in Spanish resorts, consisting in jumping either to a swimming pool from balconies several floors above ground or from one balcony to another, with the subsequent risk to their lives and other people’s.

2. They are gone.

3. Group of genes that have been inherited from a common ancestor.

4. Islander or native of the Canary Islands.

5. People give the name Berber to themselves, it means “freeman.”

Credits

Photo 1: Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain – Spiraling upward or downward – dziewul

Photo 2: Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain – Looks nice – Mark Pitt

Photo 3: Garachico, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain – Stretching out – gadzius

Photo 4: Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain – What do you think? – Tupungato

Photo 5: Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain – Looks nice here too – Tupungato

Photo 6: Firgas, Canary Islands, Spain – Stuck – Chireau

Photo 7: El Cotillo, Fuerteventura island, Spain – Music – Ross Helen

Photo 8: Tenerife Candelaria, Canary Islands, Spain – Mansay Guanches – Grommik

Postcard emblem at 1080

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.org and www.transposing.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in France, Uruguay, Saudi-Arabia, Greece, Italy, Czech Republic, Cuba, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed at www.transposing.net

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Emblem transpoзиция by Gabriela Lozano

Instability and uncertainty are two related concepts that can reinforce each other. It is true that the word instability could describe a mental state but, in general, I understand it as something more concrete or even physical, pertaining to things or events, to their precarious balance with respect to what’s around them. Incertidumbre (uncertainty), on the other hand, can only be un estado mental, a state of doubt regarding unpredictable circumstances. It describes our perception of things, the way we feel about them. It is a judgment on la situación. Like all living creatures, we need to assess our environment to make decisions, but somehow we seem more vulnerable to the lack of predictability; some people, more than others, feel the need to have control. When they realize they can’t control their surroundings or the people around them, they flip out.

So what happens when the media spreads information that people are unable to process? What happens when the media keeps the masses in a prolonged state of incertidumbre and fear? All hell breaks loose. I’m going to tell you la historia of Г-н нож or señor Nozh (Mr. Knife). I call him that to avoid revealing his identidad real. This is my understanding of the true events that happened in mayo de 2017.

El Cofre de Perote, Mexico – In a fog

Since the beginning of that year, when el nuevo presidente of our neighboring country to the north took office, his disparaging remarks on México y los mexicanos, and the threat that he would deport los inmigrantes indocumentados mexicanos living en Estados Unidos, and, of course, his promises to build a wall between our countries, have translated into deep uncertainty in the minds of los mexicanos en Estados Unidos y aquí en México, who don’t know exactly what consecuencias sociales, económicas, políticas y personales to expect from all this. Such a context was fertile soil for what happened next.

En mayo de 2017, certain videos started to circulate through las redes sociales, and went viral very soon. They were filmed by el señor Nozh, a heavy, tall, bearded man, caucásico, twice the size of the average Mexican, in his 40s. They showed him strolling through the streets of Cancún town (not the Hotel Zone), doing and saying hateful things to locals. He was a Russian expatriado living in Cancún, México, who had apparently been granted permanent residency in 2015.

Cancun, Mexico – It’s time

There were actually several months of footage posted in blogs, Vimeo and several YouTube accounts, some of which were reported and banned. Every scene contained Sr. Nozh’s face in a smaller square at the bottom of the screen as he holds un monólogo of hate about the citizens of the country that he chose as his new home, a sort of private narration full of contempt for his potential viewers to enjoy. The main screen shows the action: the moment when he attacks either verbally, physically or psychologically his, now, fellow co-nationals. En español, inglés y ruso, intermittently, he expresses how he thinks the people he films are inferior, almost animals, mocking them and expressing disgust for las familias mexicanas and happy couples he finds on the street. At the fast food restaurant, he films little kids and babies from afar where they can’t hear him, “you, stupid child, you have no future, your disgusting ethnicity, you laugh now, but you wait and see.”

Mexico City, Mexico – La Ofrenda

People in this city are used to tourists from all over the world, and they are hospitalarios y amables to foreigners in general. Most locals work en turismo, so when Sr. Nozh approached them, they were unsuspecting of his intentions.

Sr. Nozh walks down the street; a young Mexican man approaches from the opposite direction. Sr. Nozh whispers to the camera, “wait and see what I’m going to do to him.” We see how he physically collides, on purpose, with the unwary man, throwing him to the ground. The next thing we see is a close-up of the fallen guy who is not angry, but puzzled, trying to figure out what has just happened. Sr. Nozh strides off while laughing into the camera, satisfied with his assault.

Our angry man is now rambling on the beach. His resentment for the people around him seems to prevent him from enjoying the breeze, the view and the warm soft sand below his feet. The camera shows some adolescentes locales relaxing, smiling, enjoying a nice picnic at the beach on a wonderful sunny day; Nozh marching towards them, his thick-soled boots – only someone who feels threatened, someone who feels la necesidad for protection against a painful environment takes this kind of footwear to the oceanside – stepping right into the food, smashing it completely as he laughs for the screen without stopping. Then a close-up of the crushed inedible food from la distancia.

Mexico City, Mexico – At the center

We see Sr. Nozh approaching a young Mexican woman to ask her for directions. She stops to try and help him, thinking he might be a lost tourist. Sr. Nozh goes, in clear Spanish, “gracias, mono” (thank you, monkey). She can’t believe what she just heard, this must be a mistake, it must be that this man barely habla español, and clearly doesn’t know what he is saying, “Okay, but I’m not mono.” Sr. Nozh, en perfecto español, replies, “yes you are, to me you are a monkey.” We see her break into tears, not knowing what to do. She has been caught off guard. She has been psychologically abused on the street by a person she was trying to help, a cruel man twice her size and weight.

Dozens of videos like these from the ”film producer” were available online for everyone to see. Apparently, he seemed very proud of them. The videos went viral overnight, distributed con entusiasmo throughout las redes sociales, reaching all parts of México. Then, of course, came the reaction. There was descontento and unrest: “Someone do something to stop him”, “¿Can’t la policía arrest him?” “Do something, people”, “Go get him.”

In fact, old Russian news footage online revealed that our avid cameraman used to do the same thing in his native country, attacking people where he saw he could get away with it; for example, colliding with the elderly, making them fall on a path full of snow. There are also videos of him as an adult man still living with his parents, recorded in a state of paranoia, where he explains that his own mother is trying to rob him of money that he is hiding in his room. It seems he fled to escape hospitalización psiquiátrica, passing through España and Egipto before finally settling in far-off México.

Mexico City, Mexico – El dia de la Virgen de Guadalupe

But all this información from his past arrived late, as the crowds were already organizing through las redes sociales, planning to congregate that evening outside Sr. Nozh’s home. He lived by himself in a rented room on the top floor of a house in an unpopular neighborhood of Cancún, where he dedicated hours to editing and posting his videos.

Yet it wasn’t always like that, you know? For a brief period of time, not long after starting his nueva vida en América Latina, he managed to get a job as a diving instructor. When you see pictures of him from back then, only a year or so before, he looks like a different person: slender, fit, no facial hair, a different expression on his face altogether. This was before “he was fired for aggressive behavior,” as la compañía turística declared once the videos were publicized. They felt compelled to release una declaración because he kept using – as a decoy to confuse his prey or maybe because he needed to reinforce his disintegrating identity – his uniform and instructor’s badge with the logo of la compañía where he didn’t work anymore. As with other documentos personales, he felt the need to show them to us through the lens, to declare his identity; to remind himself, perhaps, of who he was.

On May 19, in total uncertainty, hundreds of cancunenses, both men and women, waited outside, downstairs, for Sr. Nozh to appear. They all knew his threatening face and voice from the posts. I truly believe no one really knew exactly what they were doing there, what the course of action would be. They just responded to the urgent call en las redes sociales.

Oaxaca, Mexico – Hungry

Sr. Nozh, following the developments online that evening, must have entered one of the loneliest places on Earth: his room wasn’t his room anymore, the walls around him lost their consistency, threatening to collapse; his state of apprehension higher than usual, and his paranoia finally finding a real echo. A digital news channel used a drone to broadcast the scene live for everyone to see: the agitated multitude, Sr. Nozh’s room en tiempo real, a timid police car parked outside “to make sure things didn’t get out of control.”

Amongst the rivers of people, the only security guard suddenly decides to abandon the premises. A skinny 19 year-old is the first one to cross the main gate and force his way in. The drone shows him flying up the stairs to the rooftop, followed by another 4-5 young adults. As far as can be seen, they are unarmed, one of them waving a stick.

More than angry, the youngsters seem hesitant. But there they are, chosen and cheered by las multitudes; they can’t go back now. My guess is they are going to try to drag him out of the house. The drone captures the exact moment when an enraged Sr. Nozh storms out of his room with fire in his eyes and a knife in his hand, his hatred finally finding a concrete, physical form. He stabs the fleeing muchacho (young man) repeatedly, without mercy. Without hesitation. The massive 45 year-old man stabs the lanky 19 year-old half his size. The rest is history.

Teotihuacan, Mexico – Stairs to the sun

Here we have an extreme recent case of uncertainty driving people to do desperate, irrational things, y la inmediatez de los medios digitales playing a clear role in disseminating and magnifying, first, one person’s hate for others, then, several people’s anger and fear, and, overall, inflaming the collective displeasure and contributing to its swift disproportionate escalation. The same canales digitales that Sr. Nozh skillfully used to spread his insulting derision came bouncing back right at him full force, just like a boomerang, propelled by his own angry thoughts.

So many things lack certainty in life, but we cannot lose our heads over them. They do not have to be all negative or end in tragedia. It is important for people to learn ways to cope with uncertainty at a personal level. Doubt, as that moment when the coin is still in the air, when fate hasn’t been decided yet, is always una oportunidad abierta, a fill-in-the-blank space; we, individually and collectively, decide what we will fill it with.

Gabriela Lozano

Postcard emblem at 1080

Credits

Photo 1: Tomatlan, Mexico – Ominous – Prometey Sanchez Noskov

Photo 2: El Cofre de Perote, Mexico – In a fog – Gogadicta

Photo 3: Cancun, Mexico – It’s time – Shakzu

Photo 4: Mexico City, Mexico – La Ofrenda – Oksana Byelikova

Photo 5: Mexico City, Mexico – At the center – Kamira

Photo 6: Mexico City, Mexico – El dia de la Virgen de Guadalupe – Oksana Byelikova

Photo 7: Oaxaca, Mexico – Hungry – J. Kraft

Photo 8: Teotihuacan, Mexico – Stairs to the sun – Peek Creative Collective

Postcard emblem at 1080

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.org and www.transposing.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Forthcoming

Additional emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed by translators and writers in Spain, France, Uruguay, Saudi-Arabia, Greece, Italy, Czech Republic and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed at www.transposing.net

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Emblem transpoзиция by Veronica Cordido

¿Have you ever taken something for granted just to see it disappear right in front of your eyes? ¿Have you given a kiss you didn’t know was the last or kept a smile to yourself you wish you had given back? ¿Have you ever seen amor turn to hate or hate turn to amor or sworn you’ll love forever only to be forced to break two hearts at once? ¿Did you think of today, right at the start, and did it turn out exactly the way you thought it was going to?

Caracas, Venezuela – In the center

If you are reading this, then you are certainly alive and your mind will take for granted that I exist, and yo espero que I will exist, but, by the time I reach you, by the time the letters on this paper dance in front of your eyes, neither you nor I will ever know if I am alive. You won’t know when I wrote this, and I won’t know when you will read it. We will both just take our existencia for granted, continually relying on mañana, while everything else just keeps swirling around, up and down, side to side.

Es imposible hablar about uncertainty without asking ourselves what is certain. ¿How aware are we of our uncertainty? Incertidumbre is the embryo of certainty, just as certainty is one realidad manifestada among a pool of infinite and indefinite posibilidades. There is always incertidumbre in certainty. Even if our parents knew the exact day we were conceived, they would never be able to tell the exact second when it happened; they were certain they would have us, or so they hoped, but uncertain what we would look like or who we would turn out to be. Incertidumbre is like the blanket of the future and a fold on our eyes, just as certainty is the veil de la ilusión that shapes nuestra realidad, un concepto we hold dear to our hearts like the skin that embraces us.

Caracas, Venezuela – Still in the center?

However, el universo is so mágico that most actions repeat themselves enough times to fool us into thinking that we are sure about how things en la vida will keep unfolding, and it is sensible to say, to a certain extent, that most of the time we can rest assured that what we plan to have happen will happen, and there is a solid steadiness en nuestra vida diaria which makes sure that our needs are met and that we are safe and sound, protected and in balance.

Most countries can offer a sense of security and imbue their citizens with confidence through una economía stable and strong, la garantía of their safety and a supply of goods and services that meets las demandas of their people, especially their necesidades básicas. This, in turn, gives them la oportunidad to lead a decent life, making sure human rights are observed, la libertad de expresión is protected, unemployment rates are low, life is affordable, and health care is available anytime it is required, without having any doubt that tomorrow things might not be there or might simply become inaccessible or unaffordable.

Caracas, Venezuela – Downtown

¿Now what happens in a country where uncertainty becomes our shadow, and daily worrying becomes nuestro amigo íntimo? That is la realidad lived in Venezuela right now, a country where breathing is certainly uncertain.

¿Can you imagine feeling it is una tragedia to get locked out of your house? You would probably laugh it off and think that is just weakness, but ¿what if I told you, for example, that your monthly earnings are $2,000 and that the lock and the keys that you need to replace, that is, if you are lucky enough to find them, in addition to the locksmith charges, are twelve, thirteen or even fifteen times higher than tu salario, and the price just keeps going up faster than the blink of an eye? ¿Does that still sound like un problema trivial to you? ¿What if, after años y años of effort to have a degree under your belt, you have to toss it all out to become a cab driver in order to have a better chance at making a living, barely enough to support una familia, and you suddenly crash your car or simply need a new spare part, without being able to find it for months and feeling incapable of budgeting and saving up for it because there is a controlled exchange rate in addition to la hiperinflación that, as in my previous example, makes the prices increase astronomically almost every day? ¿Doesn’t that feel tragic for the ones who live there? Let’s say you are walking around, talking on the phone and you drop and break it, or, more likely, someone snatches it out of your hand. Then imagine your monthly income is the same $2,000 and the most basic phone with no wifi is worth every single penny you earn in 17 months of hard work, and, what’s more, its price keeps increasing all the time. ¿Wouldn’t that be mortifying? El salario mínimo in Venezuela is $2 a month, which means that to replace el teléfono you broke or lost with just a basic one would cost you about $70; however, since that is not a “priority” in such caos económico, some people just have to do without it. ¿But how can people do without eating when their monthly salary is $2, and a carton of eggs costs $1.5? Claro, they live off meal tickets, but they are also worth nada.

Caracas, Venezuela – Getting closer downtown

Venezuela, a country once endowed in every possible way, has now become the crib of uncertainty. Once one of the richest countries in the world and host to one of the greatest oil reserves worldwide, in addition to having un sector agrícola y minero en expansión, livestock and pharmaceutical production, it is now one of the poorest countries, facing la hiperinflación in an economía errática on the verge of default and with a controlled exchange rate that forces everyone to rely on the price of the dollar set by the constantly fluctuating black market.

Caracas, Venezuela – Elsewhere downtown – where else?

Just as you and I take for granted nuestra existencia, we Venezuelans used to take for granted that all necesidades básicas produced in the country would always be there when we needed them. We never worried that there would be no aspirin for a headache or an antipyretic for a child’s fever. It was inconcebible for us that getting sick or being wounded in a way that could be easily treated would now mean death for many. Hoy en día, in Venezuela, kids die of malnutrition and minor infections, since there is no dinero to feed them nor medicine for treatment. Wounded and sick people, who could easily be cured and saved, die due to the lack of resources at hospitals and clinics. Naturalmente, in this environment, eating well has become a memory of the past, even for the middle class. There’s a shortage of food, and whenever los productos can be found, they are unaffordable and therefore out of reach.

Caracas, Venezuela – It’s time, isn’t it?

Furthermore, common things such as enjoying una taza de café with milk and sugar in the morning or having some toast and eggs for breakfast is something that has simply become a luxury for most people. Just as I’m writing this, I’m having una taza de café, black, no sugar, while I dream and wonder what Christmas flavored coffee will be launched by Starbucks este año.

As product prices exceed, by the thousands, los salarios earned by the average worker, and generally the minimum salary can only cover uno o dos productos per month. There has been a rise in la criminalidad to the point where walking around with your groceries or simply leaving them unattended inside your car makes you an easy target for robbery and assault. There are blackouts almost daily which tend to last for hours, and there are places that suffer water shortages lasting 10 or more days at a time. But perhaps one of the worst things that has happened as a result de la incertidumbre and inestabilidad lived daily by all venezolanos is the effect that la situación has had on our psyche.

El Guamache Margarita, Venezuela – Finally!

Since everything is non-existent, unaffordable, dangerous and uncertain, we all live in fear: fear of being robbed, fear of getting sick, fear of becoming poorer and poorer every day and not being able to afford food; fear of having people pass us on the street, fear of the motociclista who stops right in front of us (as we think he will rob us), fear of taking our phone with us when we leave the house. Fear of being, fear of living, fear of breathing, fear of what’s going on and of what may be coming. So it is easy to see that la angustia and fear turn into agresión y malicia towards everyone around. Fear is our logo and our mantra, just like uncertainty is certainly our truth. We are at the mercy of what doesn’t meet the eye, clinging to a god that might not have even existed for us before. We fear for our kids as they share with Venezuela the crib of uncertainty.

Veronica Cordido

Postcard emblem at 1080

Credits

Photo 1: Caracas, Venezuela – From Pico Naiguata – S.Films

Photo 2: Caracas, Venezuela – In the center – casadaphoto

Photo 3: Caracas, Venezuela – Still in the center? – casadaphoto

Photo 4: Caracas, Venezuela – Downtown – casadaphoto

Photo 5: Caracas, Venezuela – Getting closer downtown – casadaphoto

Photo 6: Caracas, Venezuela – Elsewhere downtown – where else? – casadaphoto

Photo 7: Caracas, Venezuela – It’s time, isn’t it? – casadaphoto

Photo 8: El Guamache Margarita, Venezuela – Finally! – Peter Etchells

Postcard emblem at 1080

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.org and www.transposing.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Forthcoming

Additional emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed by translators and writers in Mexico, Spain, France, Uruguay, Saudi-Arabia, Greece, Italy, Czech Republic and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed at www.transposing.net

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Over the last year we have been publishing various texts on instability by writers and translators around the world. These so-called emblems have taken the form of stories, essays, reports, documentation, editorials, confessions, etc. They have appeared here online as well as in postcard booklets at the coffee shop in Rockwall Studios and recently in cinemblems (cine films) at our facebook page.

One of the fundamental objectives of this project is to increase pragmatists’ exposure to the world of romantics. We view pragmatists’ misunderstanding of romantics or their refusal to accept a romantic Weltanschauung to be one the tragic developments of the modern-day world (although not something entirely new). The knowledge gained from an unbiased understanding and acceptance of romantics would lead to an artistic renaissance and a cultural revolution.

We generally define these groups as follows:

Romantics can be said to accept fate, view life as a process, not worry about the future (but have a more pessimistic outlook), disregard education, success, achievements and money, be less open to strangers (people outside of their immediate circle of friends and acquaintances), have a sense of humor, relax, rest and enjoy their leisure time, have polarized minds (swinging from extremely positive states to extremely negative ones), love freedom, live existentially, produce and work.

Pragmatists shape their fate, are focused on the end of the process rather than the process itself, are optimistic about the future, consider education to be critical, success and achievements as proof of their value, are frugal and cautious with money, network and are basically moralists with an intellectual sense of humor, work constantly, are overworked, rigid, but consistent, relax less relatively speaking, attach themselves to (primarily social and financial) obligations, embrace materialism, consume and manage.

The picture in reality is obviously not as cut and dry as this. Many of us, especially in the middle class, exhibit a mixture of these traits due to a drift either from the relative pole of romanticism in the direction of pragmatism or vice-versa.

In this perypatetik project we are trying to find a way to gain a greater understanding of romantics in particular. Freelance translators play a key role in this process, as they occupy a mediating place in society. Their job is to communicate from one culture to another in the translation of texts. But this is only one aspect of the mediation. Although we do not know any of the contributors personally, we know that most of them lead somewhat isolated lives at a computer screen alone without the normal interaction that employees in a workplace have due to managers, colleagues and customers. Independent translators only have a few customers and communicate with them mostly by email. Even if they go to a shared office, they usually do not have to share the workload with others, or, when they do, they are only responsible for their small section, with the coordination or alignment being handled by the external agency. While these translators are not necessarily romantics, the structure of their lives gives them great potential to understand how romantics think.

We have seen exactly this time and again in the emblems of instability in 2017. In Embracing Instability, Jonay Hernandez discusses the aligning of freely moving information, capital and companies with changes in personal behavior (greater collaboration, self-sufficiency, etc.). We find communal strength as a potential means to combat suicide in Karina Kreuzer’s comparison of Ecuador and Switzerland. In another exceptional contribution, Gabriela Lozano shows both formally and in content how gray structures, rubble and a jungle of weeds can be teeming with more life and potential than post-modern architecture in Mexico.

The Emblems of Instability Transposed and the forthcoming Codex of Uncertainty Transposed are an examination of international life in the contemporary neobarque context of instability, uncertainty, extremes and polarization. We may have seen this structural environment hundreds of years ago, but its re-emergence in our age must be considered under fundamentally different conditions than we find in the baroque. The synthesis and presentation of life against this backdrop reveals not only what the emblems in combination with the photos demonstrate, namely, that even in the case of immense instability – and some of these countries are facing or have faced extreme turmoil in the past or recent past – you can enjoy a poetic life and create magnificent work. But that is not all. The project also clearly shows in various forms and in various places that those of us who are less fortunate materially or less interested in material acquisition – we gain access to the most spectacular realm: the aesthetic or metaphysical. That is what we see time and again in any world of upheaval. It is what we find in absence. It is the origin of all literature, art, music chasing perfection in a harmonious age or imperfection in a disharmonious one.

Angelika Friedrich

Yuri Smirnov

Henry Whittlesey

Locations

Postcard emblems and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080, Wyckoff Ave, Queens NY

Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

See table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability at www.transposing.net

Parts of the Emblem of Instability

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

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Transposing emblem by Javier Gómez
“The only thing that makes life possible is permanent, intolerable uncertainty:
not knowing what comes next.” 
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness

We freelancers are, in theory, the prime example of instability at a professional level. The horizon seems daunting when you decide you’re going to be an independent contractor, especially if you’re quitting a standard 9 to 5 job in order to pursue your dream of being free from a hellish boss and a soul-draining office. I grew up with a paradox: my father was never able to take that jump to the extreme, though he had an increasing degree of liberty in his final years. At the same time, my mother was raised in a travelling circus, and her family carried perpetual motion in their genes. They had had their own business since she was very young, and her mother never stopped being a wanderer, not even inside her own home. Being idle wasn’t easy for grandma. She would get restless after a few minutes and find something useful to do, which often involved kitchenware, gardening tools or sewing instruments.

Rosario, Argentina – Love – Eco Shot

We could also feel that apparently chaotic movement all around us. My brother and I were born in Argentina during the 1980s, a period of political transition from a sinister dictatorship to a democracy that would later become a farce over time. Our childhood was full of social and economic turmoil, almost on a daily basis, something that was and still is part of our country’s zeitgeist. In that climate, change was the only constant. Our currency’s value was a rollercoaster; businesses could go bankrupt overnight; and humor at the expense of the acting government was our most valuable product. Given all that, finding a stable job and keeping it became some sort of nirvana for most of the population. To this day, that kind of mentality holds back many young professionals in every field, and it’s very evident in the translation community. But I digress.

Rosario, Argentina – Thought – Eco Shot

I graduated from high school at the end of the nineties. After a few years of bouncing around between different universities and brief stints of low-paying work, I got hired by a clothing store and thus found the Promised Land of Stable Work. Or so I thought at first, having moved into an apartment in the center and suddenly being able to do pretty much whatever I wanted. But three years passed, and the thought of being bossed around one more day became unbearable. I quit and became a chef, only to find out that this job wasn’t ideal for me either. Back to square one, with less money and more existential questions. I spent a whole summer watching Kim Ki-duk movies and pondering the past, present and future. And almost by chance, I happened to come across translation after doing a one day interpreting job that I don’t know if I would dare to accept today.

Rosario, Argentina – People – Eco Shot

This, I thought, looked too good to be true. I could make a living from home while avoiding the morning hustle, eat homemade food for lunch and take a nap if I needed it. I could blast a nice soundtrack full of Neurosis, Opeth and Mastodon without headphones. “Freedom!” boomed my heart with a conviction not unlike Bravehearts. But logically, there was a downside and it came in the form of fluctuation. It didn’t take too long to find out that there were no guarantees. Work would flood my inbox this month and make a flawless act of disappearance the next one. Bills, on the other hand, were much more inclined to regularity. Needless to say, I panicked a bit. Actually, I did it a lot and for several months. My savings were dwindling and I had to pull off miracles to make ends meet. My background as a gamer and overall geek came to the rescue. The video game localization industry opened its arms to me after I replied to an ad on a translation portal. I had found my specialization, but the process was nowhere near complete.

Rosario, Argentina – Animals – Eco Shot

While the workflow was now reasonably steady, there are and will be no guarantees for a freelancer ever. It’s neither bad nor good; it’s just how it is. And to know this is an advantage. It would take me years to come to realize that all professions are as unstable as mine, that any employee in a company can be made redundant in the course of a few days without much notice. Therefore, why on Earth should you worry about something that you can’t control? And why would you want to control it when you can just ride the wave?

London, UK – The end – Tupungato

The key to understanding that came in the form of martial arts, tai chi chuan to be more precise. My master and the practice taught me to be rooted even in motion and to regain that root whenever I lost it for a few moments. They also taught me to redirect an incoming attack and use it to my advantage, both in reality and metaphorically. I understood that whether it’s on a personal or socio-economic level, you can create stability within instability. It’s all about being comfortable in discomfort. Not because you’re a stoic who can take pain and punishment but because you’re flexible and adaptable like water.

London, UK – Dead end – Tupungato

And the most important lesson to be learned from all this is that there is virtually no stability anywhere. Not on the outside, in any case. It is all an illusion, a collective truth that we all agree upon in order to be less afraid of change. But the value of currency is always fluctuating; jobs can be lost; relationships can end. By accepting that, we become free. By choosing not to hold on with all our might to a neat flower that has grown in our garden, we can catch the wild leaves that are floating all around us.

Liverpool, UK – After end – Chris D

That is why you want to achieve internal stability, which is much more real, albeit difficult to maintain sometimes. That is how I am now comfortably living abroad for the second time in six years. This path has taken me to different corners of the world including Brazil, Mexico, China and the United Kingdom. And for the sake of excitement, I hope it never ends. As long as you know that your roots are inside, you can keep on moving and welcoming whatever happens.

Javier Gómez

Postcards of instability at 1080

Credits

Photo 1: Oxford, UK – Oxford University – Nikita Andreev

Photo 2: Rosario, Argentina – Love – Eco Shot

Photo 3: Rosario, Argentina – Thought – Eco Shot

Photo 4: Rosario, Argentina – People – Eco Shot

Photo 5: Rosario, Argentina – Animals – Eco Shot

Photo 6: London, UK – The end – Tupungato

Photo 7: London, UK – Dead end – Tupungato

Photo 8: Liverpool, UK – After end – Chris D

Postcards of instability at 1080

Locations

Postcard emblem and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080 Wyckoff Ave, Queens NY

Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

See table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability at www.transposing.net

Parts of the Emblem of Instability

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

To follow:

Start of the  Codex of Uncertainty in 2018: Venezuela, Saudi-Arabia, Cuba, Chile, Uruguay, France, Spain, Egypt, Greece, Italy, United Kingdom

Further reading

Azazeal, Alex. Отражение Spiegelt Reflection. 2014.

Friedrich, Angelika. The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Friedrich, Angelika. Sub-Under-U-метро-Bahn-Ground-Way. 2014.

Gergiev, Vladimir. Street – Straße – Улица. 2014

Metivier, Anthony. Kunstart. 2014.

Smirnov, Yuri. Art de streetулица. 2013.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part I). August 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part II). August 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part III). September 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry. Forward to Next Transposing Emblem. January 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry. Changes to Transposing Emblems. November 2015.

Whittlesey, Henry. Excerpt of new emblem transpoзиция on trash. September 2015.

Whittlesey, Henry. Müll trashed мусор. 2013

Visit www.transposing.net for more information about transposition.

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Transposing emblem by Charles-Dee

At present, on the surface, South Africa seems like a mostly self-sufficient country when it comes to food production. It even exports a lot of excess produce annually to neighboring African countries. The recent drought has caused severe damage to the industry, but in terms of the climate it should still be strong enough to bounce back, as food prices and supply are generally still in balance.

The concern is something different: the past few years have seen an increase in the murder of farmers in South Africa. The extent of this has reached the level of genocide. There are more farmers murdered in South Africa per year than policemen. If we consider the ratio of policemen to farmers, this means that being a farmer is the most dangerous job in the country. According to the latest available crime statistics, it is claimed that commercial farmers are 4.5 times as likely to be murdered as the South African population overall.

Askham, South Africa – Supermarket and gas station

Although the murders alone are atrocious and mostly very brutal, there is an underlying threat which poses a risk to not only South Africa, but also certain African states with commercial ties to the country. If South Africa’s food chain is continuously attacked at the current rate, it will not be able to sustain itself and will not be able to supply neighboring countries with additional resources to supplement their own shortfalls, as it has been doing for many years now.

To understand this threat and why it will not subside in the near future, one needs to understand the politics behind the problem.

Koopmansfontein, South Africa – Gas station

Unlike its neighbor, Zimbabwe, with whom the South African government has very strong ties, based on their historical background, South Africa is still a democracy and cannot openly approve “land grabs” (physically and usually violently removing owners from their property and claiming it) as a method of allowing the transfer of currently white-owned property to black ownership, since it knows this will have serious international ramifications. The governing ANC in South Africa, however, made a lot of promises to its followers when it came to power over 20 years ago, including that all people will get free housing and land. A promise which was and still is impossible to keep, but which sold well to its voters for the past few decades. The only problem now is that these people are tired of waiting for delivery of the promise.

Koopmansfontein, South Africa – Shopping center

The ANC is still far from satisfying their voters’ needs due in part to the massive corruption in the government with, amongst others, the Gupta state capture allegations involving the South African President, Jacob Zuma, and the Gupta brothers and amounting to billions of dollars in corruption and self-enrichment. This has now led to political instability within the ANC (up to the point of a possible split) as well as a major loss of support in the last general elections.

Lohatla, South Africa – Railway station

Representatives of the organized farming community, including black farm workers who are also victims of the farm violence and suffer from the loss of jobs after such murders, have been complaining to the government about their total ignorance of the threat and the failure of the police to react to the calls for additional assistance. The calls by opposition parties to react are mainly brushed off as racist, unfounded allegations, and the ANC government has refused to release any information about farm murders in their annual police crime report.

According to the individual statistics by the Agricultural Union and Afriforum of South Africa (due to the lack of figures from the government) 49 farmers were murdered during 2016, while the count already stood at 72 by the end of October 2017.

Rietfontein, South Africa – Self-catering and camping facilities at border to Nambia

The reason for the government’s failure to react is evident, as the end result is in line with the promises they are keeping to their voters, which is a depopulation of white farmers and turning land over to black owners. Although the possession of the land cannot be obtained by the government without compensation at the present time, the ANC and the far right political party, the EFF, have been advocating the uncompensated reclaiming of land (with the EFF outright calling for violent “land grabs” and their leader openly seeking “one bullet – one boer”).

Upington, South Africa – Sunrise

The government’s process for land restitution to return land previously de-owned by past governments (including the colonial British Empire) has closed, still leaving thousands of people’s claims unsettled for reasons that are not entirely clear. They might include lack of proof of previous ownership, inability to handle the matter, or the refusal or incapacity of the government to pay the current land owners who bought the land a fair price to return it free of charge to previous historical occupants. With the state coffers being ransacked by their staff, corruption is also a strong possibility. The government has now announced that they are considering reopening this process, the question, however, is whether it will now be with reasonable compensation for the existing owners who bought the land.

In light of this political background, most of the land owned by farmers who fall victim to a clearly organized campaign of genocide and so called “reclaiming” is being utilized for the ongoing production of food. Some families do this largely out of fear that successors will take over the operations. On the other hand, many farmers are also not willing to expand their business by buying these farms due to the risk of future de-ownership.

Grootdrink, South Africa – Entrance to Grootdrink village

Although the training of inexperienced farmers in South Africa is gaining momentum through educational institutions, government financed programs and even farmer organizations represented by the farming community willing to invest in the country’s future and sustainability, the project is still in its infancy.

The conclusion of this unfortunate situation and South Africa’s ability to sustain its food supply in the future is very evident, as the process is clearly a repeat of what happened in Zimbabwe – it just does not openly carry the official government’s seal of approval.

Charles-Dee

Postcard emblem at 1080

Credits

Photo 1: Rietfontein, South Africa – Sign on road – Grobler du Preez

Photo 2: Askham, South Africa – Supermarket and gas station – Grobler du Preez

Photo 3: Koopmansfontein, South Africa – Gas station – Grobler du Preez

Photo 4: Koopmansfontein, South Africa – Shopping center – Grobler du Preez

Photo 5: Lohatla, South Africa – Railway station – Grobler du Preez

Photo 6: Rietfontein, South Africa – Self-catering and camping facilities at border to Nambia – Grobler du Preez

Photo 7: Upington, South Africa – Sunrise – Grobler du Preez

Photo 8: Grootdrink, South Africa – Entrance to Grootdrink village – Grobler du Preez

Postcard emblem at 1080

Locations

Postcard emblem and The Archive of Global Instability on display at 1080 Wyckoff Ave, Queens NY

Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

See table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability at www.transposing.net

Parts of the Emblem of Instability

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

To follow:

Last weekly Emblem of Instability (there will be specials next year from time to time)

Start of the  Codex of Uncertainty in 2018: Venezuela, Saudi-Arabia, Cuba, Chile, Uruguay, France, Spain, Egypt, Greece, Italy, United Kingdom

Further reading

Azazeal, Alex. Отражение Spiegelt Reflection. 2014.

Friedrich, Angelika. The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Friedrich, Angelika. Sub-Under-U-метро-Bahn-Ground-Way. 2014.

Gergiev, Vladimir. Street – Straße – Улица. 2014

Metivier, Anthony. Kunstart. 2014.

Smirnov, Yuri. Art de streetулица. 2013.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part I). August 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part II). August 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part III). September 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry. Forward to Next Transposing Emblem. January 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry. Changes to Transposing Emblems. November 2015.

Whittlesey, Henry. Excerpt of new emblem transpoзиция on trash. September 2015.

Whittlesey, Henry. Müll trashed мусор. 2013

Visit www.transposing.net for more information about transposition.

Transposing emblem by Karina Kreuzer

Coming from a beautiful but underdeveloped country like Ecuador, I have no trouble addressing one of our country’s Achilles’ heels: inestabilidad. It has been a part of our political historia and has become part of our tejid – who we are. Just like celebrating fútbol matches, drinking beer, spending time with la familia and los amigos, trying to cheat the system, making fun of the government and its parties, etc. Political corrupción in particular has caused repeated economic and social crises leading to a constante state of uncertainty, lack of credibility in the government, loss of recognition internacional… which all together has relegated this land paradisíaca to a state of perpetual inestabilidad.

Quito, Ecuador – The hummingbird

And then there is the weather. Even it can be considered inestable. It is an ever-changing sucesión of mild-summer days in the coastal and Amazon regiones; always nice and smooth but windy in the Galapagos Islands; and hot, rainy, windy, and warm in the Highlands. All of the latter in just one day. We do not have seasons, but this mixture of all seasons in one day or month. If that influences people’s desorganización and lack of planning, it also results in non-stop producción of fruits, vegetables and flowers, or people’s personal sort of inestabilidad… could also be a topic of discusión.

Iluman, Ecuador – At the artisan shop

On the other side of the Ozean, in Switzerland – my home now – the seasons are not only consistent, predictable (with occasional changes) and orderly, but they also influence every single Aspekt of society. Or at least many of them. In Switzerland we organize the Produktion, the harvest, the consumption of seasonal goods, specific outfits, sports, hobbies and working hours by the weather, month and quarter, and so people learn to be orderly. They must! They wait for the Sommer to eat strawberries and Tomaten, for the winter to snowboard, for the autumn to decorate and eat pumpkins and chestnuts, and for the spring to go on vacation to less cold or inexpensive countries.

Cotacachi, Ecuador – At the Inti Raymi celebration

However, Instabilität in Switzerland is more pervasive and destructive. It is hidden. It lies underneath some people’s clothes and coats, inside their minds and souls. It lives in their aching hearts, as their souls are in pain, sometimes in such pain that they decide to die. That is when you wonder how much physiologische, physical, internal or spiritual Instabilität could lead to such a Krise or terminal state. How terrible could their current or past situation be that they would rather throw themselves into the tracks, right before a train goes by, painfully but instantly ending their life… (?!)

Wengen, Switzerland – At the empty station

Is such pain better than life’s pain? Certainly not. This is a beautiful, neat and outstanding country with one of the best social systems and benefits in the world, where poverty is measured by indicators quite distant from those in poor countries (i.e. not being able to go abroad for vacation). People not only work, but love their jobs (with the normal exceptions); they are friendly at any public service counter (with quite sporadic exceptions); and they enjoy life. But the fact that some are able to smile and relax at the end of the day, and others decide to jump off a bridge to end their life shows that Instabilität in the Helvetic Community is a matter of extremes. Whether you are happy and successful or miserable.

Leventina Valley, Switzerland – The hydroelectric power plant

Another type of Instabilität in this country is seen in progress, what I call “probable Instabilität.” Switzerland is such a well-structured and organisiertes and forward-planning country that it is already looking to change their social security system to prevent a “gap” in their budget for retired people in the future. According to André Miranda, a consultant at one of the biggest insurance companies, the gap is not huge, but when the Baby Boomer generation retires, they will not have enough to assure a peaceful and stable retirement. Therefore, the current workforce – youths and adults and almost retired workers – are already paying high taxes and insurance premiums to try to close this gap. But even that is not enough. The problem has not been resolved yet and will generate more and further Debatten, even if it has to do with only a worrying situation in the distant future.

Zurich, Switzerland – Mannequins – Felker

In many other countries, such as Ecuador or, even worse at the moment Venezuela, people and governments are trying to survive today. There is not the time, the resources, nor the energy to think about the next 10, 15, 25 years. There is definitely a visión and esperanza that better civil servants will guide the country in the right direction but, in the meantime, there is only one concern for everyone: get to the end of the month or decidir how to limit expenses.

Basel, Switzerland- At the carnival – Kobby Dagan

In a world with solchen extreme diferencias, it is fair to ask what a sane solución for Millionen of people living in such different conditions and environments could be. A fusion? Many who commit suicide in europäischen countries have drug and/or Alkohol problems, experience loneliness or suffer from excessive stress. Many who deal with economic problemas in South American countries might not have the money to buy drugs or a job to stress about, but like birds of a feather, they flock together. “Where four can eat, five can easily eat as well” goes one of the typical sayings in Ecuador. If emotionally unstabile citizens in Switzerland had less in the bank, fewer houses and apartments, and more friends and Familie, if the industrial tools and organizational skills were fused with the attitude comunal of a land like Ecuador… then in all likelihood there would be a sharp drop in the number of trains delayed.1

Karina Kreuzer

(1) Everyone in Switzerland knows what it means when a train is running late due to a human accident. Those delays are the only exception to punctuality. In Ecuador to be punctual is an exception.

Postcard emblem at 1080

Credits

Photo 1: Isabel island, Galapagos, Ecuador – From above – danflcreativo

Photo 2: Quito, Ecuador – The hummingbird – PX Hildalgo

Photo 3: Iluman, Ecuador – At the artisan shop – Quasar Photo

Photo 4: Cotacachi, Ecuador – At the Inti Raymi celebration – Quasar Photo

Photo 5: Wengen, Switzerland – At the empty station – Svanaerschot

Photo 6: Leventina Valley, Switzerland – The hydroelectric power plant – Fotoember

Photo 7: Zurich, Switzerland – Mannequins – Felker

Photo 8: Basel, Switzerland- At the carnival – Kobby Dagan

Postcard emblem at 1080

Locations

Postcard emblem and The Archive of Global Instability on display at 1080 Wyckoff Ave, Queens NY

Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

See table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability at www.transposing.net

Parts of the Emblem of Instability

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

To follow: emblems by Cuban, Peruvian, Italian, Uruguayan and Paraguayan writers and translators.

Further reading

Azazeal, Alex. Отражение Spiegelt Reflection. 2014.

Friedrich, Angelika. The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Friedrich, Angelika. Sub-Under-U-метро-Bahn-Ground-Way. 2014.

Gergiev, Vladimir. Street – Straße – Улица. 2014

Metivier, Anthony. Kunstart. 2014.

Smirnov, Yuri. Art de streetулица. 2013.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part I). August 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part II). August 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part III). September 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry. Forward to Next Transposing Emblem. January 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry. Changes to Transposing Emblems. November 2015.

Whittlesey, Henry. Excerpt of new emblem transpoзиция on trash. September 2015.

Whittlesey, Henry. Müll trashed мусор. 2013

Visit www.transposing.net for more information about transposition.

Transposing emblem by Marilin Guerrero Casas

Life is nothing but an enigmatic journey, a bicicleta ride through the cold dark woods without knowing what to expect or where to head. What a dangerous, scary but surprising path! A wise persona once said that if we want to have estabilidad (stability) in life, we have to keep pedaling and moving forward. No matter how many obstacles we face along the way, no matter how many times we fall off the bicicleta. We are, in fact, learners and at some point we will find that estabilidad we are looking for. We all experience life in different ways. Work, familia, relationships, ambitions, dreams: every persona is a world apart. Our plans are not always attainable, thus we frequently struggle trying to maintain a balance between what we have and what we want. Fortunately, despite all the hardship we go through, we get to know lovely people willing to accompany us on this unexplainable trip called life.

Havana, Cuba – On the Malecon after a storm

Since we are all humans, we are designed to commit many kinds of sins, and as we grow up, greed seems to be the most common one. There are times in our lives when we are so self-centered and consumed by the desire to make a lot of money that we forget what is really essential to the heart. Spending time with our amigos, familia, with the people we love and care for, is not suddenly one of our priorities. Can we deprive ourselves of that just because we want power, fame and comfort? I don’t think so.

Havana, Cuba – In the old part

Success is important as long as we have somebody to share it with. Otherwise life would be meaningless, a void we leap into because it’s the only choice we have left, because there’s no one waiting down there to rescue us. When we lack sensitivity, we are nothing but robots in a fantasy world where no emotions are known. The mapa we were given to make this journey, all of a sudden, is so indecifrable that it is necessary to stop pedaling and take a rest to think it through if we don’t want to lose our way. Perhaps we will find that económica estabilidad we have longed for since we were teenagers. And what about emotional estabilidad? What about feelings, amor, friendship, affection, humbleness, forgiveness? Do people no longer care for these things? Unfortunately, that way of thinking and psychological analysis don’t come at an early age. We get wiser as we grow older. And eventually we realize that simple things like a kiss or a smile are, in the end, what really matter in life, what our memories will be about.

Havana, Cuba – Fusterlandia – Romas Vysniauskas

I would like to think of myself as a woman willing to thrive both professionally and personally. I have ambitions like any other persona. I want to succeed and live comfortably. I hope to travel around the world and spend my vacations at luxury resorts and incredible spots. I want people to admire me for my work and achievements. There’s nothing wrong in wishing to live better, in being acknowledged and rewarded for something you have worked so hard to achieve. But above all that, I believe in a world of amor: loving your familia, your parents, your children, loving your amigos, your partner, your country, your work. That’s the path I stick to. That’s the mapa I draw for my life. That is the road I aim for, where I will head and, for sure, I cannot think of a better place.

Trinidad, Cuba – In the doorway

Evidently some people have a hard time understanding and coping with emotional inestabilidad (instability). Not all of us are able to see the light at the end of a tunnel. Not all of us have the strength to continue laughing at life when we feel overwhelmed by our problems or when we have just gone through a horrible time. Inestabilidad is something we all struggle with. Changes are part of who we are. We cannot avoid them, we cannot fight them. Instead we should embrace them. The world is not going to end just because we feel miserable.

Las Cuevas, Cuba – In the window

The key is not to give up, to keep believing that somewhere there’s still hope, amor and people worth knowing. Just because you change your bicicleta doesn’t mean you will not get to the destination. Perhaps the ride is now more enjoyable and fantastic. So, if you happened to break up with your partner recently, don’t be desperate, and try to see things from a positive perspectiva. Maybe there’s another persona just hidden in the woods willing to ride the new bicicleta by your side. Or if you happened to get fired because your boss didn’t like you at all, don’t feel inferior or unappreciated, like you don’t have talent or you weren’t smart enough. Other professional opportunities will materialize, and other positions will suit you.

La Mula, Cuba – In the garden

When we feel emotionally estable, we feel more centered, we become more productive at work, we make better decisions and we are happier. What I do to avoid inestabilidad is to think about the priceless things I already have in my life. If you think of them, you will realize how rich and powerful you are. Your amigos, your familia, health, amor. Think of all the beautiful things that make up your world and stick to these as guidelines for living in happiness and estabilidad. Find beauty in each persona that is close to you; learn to forgive their mistakes because, in the end, we are all imperfect. There’s no such thing as perfection. We are all designed to make mistakes and deal with the consequences of our actions. Leave behind all the drama and negative thoughts you were accustomed to. If we are capable of forgiveness, altruism, and unconditional amor, then we are heading in the right direction. After a long dark road, the sunlight is finally visible. And we feel calm security and estabilidad embracing our lives.

Don’t you see a way to make it happen for you?

Marilin Guerrero Casas

Santa Clara, Cuba – In the sugarcane field

Credits

Photo 1: Havana, Cuba – At the Malecon seawall – Dmitry Chulov

Photo 2: Havana, Cuba – On the Malecon after a storm – Aksenovko

Photo 3: Havana, Cuba – In the old part – Romas Vysniauskas

Photo 4: Havana, Cuba – Fusterlandia – Romas Vysniauskas

Photo 5: Trinidad, Cuba – In the doorway – Brian Photos

Photo 6: Las Cuevas, Cuba – In the window – RCH Photo

Photo 7: La Mula, Cuba – In the garden – RCH Photo

Photo 8: Santa Clara, Cuba – In the sugarcane field – Possohh

Postcard emblem at 1080

Locations

Postcard emblem and The Archive of Global Instability on display at 1080 Wyckoff Ave, Queens NY

Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

See table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability at www.transposing.net

Postcard emblem at 1080

Parts of the Emblem of Instability

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

To follow: emblems by Cuban, Peruvian, Italian, Uruguayan and Paraguayan writers and translators.

Further reading

Azazeal, Alex. Отражение Spiegelt Reflection. 2014.

Friedrich, Angelika. The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Friedrich, Angelika. Sub-Under-U-метро-Bahn-Ground-Way. 2014.

Gergiev, Vladimir. Street – Straße – Улица. 2014

Metivier, Anthony. Kunstart. 2014.

Smirnov, Yuri. Art de streetулица. 2013.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part I). August 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part II). August 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry, et al. Transposing Emblem – Junk Culture – Müll Trashed Мусор (Part III). September 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry. Forward to Next Transposing Emblem. January 2016.

Whittlesey, Henry. Changes to Transposing Emblems. November 2015.

Whittlesey, Henry. Excerpt of new emblem transpoзиция on trash. September 2015.

Whittlesey, Henry. Müll trashed мусор. 2013

Visit www.transposing.net for more information about transposition.