Transposing emblem by Sara Deiana

Well, this is something I come to think about quite often: suicide.

No, don’t get me wrong. I don’t think about committing suicide, what I mean is that I think about suicide as a dimension, a door you open and close very quickly, which only people who actually do use that door can embrace. That is it: I find myself thinking about these people, their stories, how they do it and, above all, why they do it. What pushes them to their limits in such a powerful way that they need to be sure to die in the way they choose, and be able to stop bearing the uncertainty of tomorrow?

Auckland, New Zealand – My friend

It is the greatest act of destruction toward ourselves because LA VITA is the only thing we have that we can be sure about. Or it is safer to say is the only certain thing, while we have it. What triggers us to end the most precious of all gifts?

Coromandel, New Zealand – Man

It is almost a paradox that the countries with the highest rate of suicide are often also countries with apparently the highest standard of living in the so-called developed world. I have now been living for a while in a country that is known world-wide for its laid-back approach to life, pristine and endless beaches, snow-capped mountains, breath-taking and magnificent landscapes: New Zealand. But probably not many people are aware of its sad record, this silent health epidemic of suicide. From the outside we can only speculate and try to find the possible reasons: so, when I think about it from a foreigner-living-in-New-Zealand point of view I can see that being such a young country, the “lack” of an old historic heritage can play a huge role in the way people feel and live.

Catlins, New Zealand – Watching the Pacific

It is a real challenge to define what culture truly means in New Zealand; the only real culture I can witness with my own eyes comes from the Maori people, from their values and myths, evidence of which can be found in many toponyms around the North and South Island. The European immigrants who have come here since the beginning of the nineteen century, largely recruited as settlers, were traditional rural craft workers such as builders or blacksmiths and agricultural laborers. These skilled people came to New Zealand to fulfil dreams of independence through the ownership of land. Obviously, these folks were interested in making a living and settling well in a new country so far away from the one they left. Therefore, I believe that it took a few decades for them to focus on the enjoyable things in life, like recreational culture, leisure and arts, consequently losing a bit of the umbilical cord that strongly tied them to their country of origin, also due to the remoteness of their new home.

Auckland, New Zealand – Airborne 

That same geographical isolation and the resulting dependence on imports has created a Do It Yourself culture, which has been a necessity for many centuries, until not so long ago. This peculiar trait has shaped the characters and souls of kiwis (Kiwi is a native bird and unique symbol of the country; New Zealander are colloquially named after this national icon). This can be a good thing, as people are strong, practical and not easily impressed, but if you think in broader terms, it also has its negative side which we see in the widespread belief that everyone, especially men, have to be good with their hands and good on the land, can’t show weakness and have to conceal their emotions and, if they do not do so, they should feel ashamed. So, many boys grow up with the idea that they are not allowed to think, “I can’t do it by myself.” This is known as the “toughen-up” culture, common here in New Zealand and ingrained in kiwis‘ blood. And not surprisingly, the suicide rate is, in fact, higher among young men.

Auckland, New Zealand – Night

Another important aspect of being a kiwi is sport and being outdoors, both of which play a big role in today’s society and lifestyle. If you don’t conform, there’s not really a valid, widely accepted alternative. For example, I just read in today’s newspaper: “as New Zealanders we grow up having a love of the great outdoors and knowing that we have a wonderful country…” It is something that HAS to be that way. You hardly need to be anything else. Again, a good and a bad thing. The prevalent culture is centered around the outdoors, the sport, being strong, masculine, stoic, physically fit and terse. It is common to grow up surrounded by a “boy don’t cry attitude” instilled in you from a young age, which in your adulthood transforms itself into “you need to value achievement and success,” to have tough rugby players as main male role models. This does not necessarily help you find your own way. On the contrary, I think it leads more of us to question ourselves, to ask where we belong, and the uncertainty of a proper personal identity can be perhaps described as an existential void that we are dealing with down here. There is not a huge and diverse culture that works as a protective force and shows us the way, something that act as a soft pillow to fall back on. I suppose we are still feeling our way through things and this makes us feel even more the uncertainty of it all as we haven’t found the right combination yet. The sad statistic (and we are talking about 606 people who took their own lives in 2017 alone; that is, one person dies, by their own hands, every 15 hours) is hard to swallow and even harder to address, but certainly there is a very big lack of access to a cohesive cultural history in New Zealand, a strong reality that can make us all feel less lost.

Auckland, New Zealand – Railed

This may all just be a single opinion, but all these kiwis that became numbers in the statistics must have something in common…

Sara Deiana

Credits

Photo 1: Queenstown, New Zealand – Shotover – Josh Withers

Photo 2: Auckland, New Zealand – My friend – CMDR Shane

Photo 3:  Coromandel, New Zealand – Man – Riekephotos

Photo 4: Catlins, New Zealand – Watching the Pacific – Fijalka

Photo 5: Auckland, New Zealand – Airborne – Henry Mcintosh

Photo 6: Auckland, New Zealand – Night – Samuel Ferrara

Photo 7: Auckland, New Zealand – Railed – Dev


Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Britain, Poland, China, Argentina, Lebanon, India, Croatia, Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Ghadir Younes

In a country with a turbulent past and extensive government corruption in the present, uncertainty seems to be the defining element of our lives. This uncertainty manifests itself in our daily economic and financial situation, starting with the lack of jobs and high unemployment rate and extending all the way to insufficient social services and plans to help Lebanon’s poor.

Tyre, Lebanon – After the rain

The journey of uncertainty in Lebanon starts with deciding on our path of education: Does acquiring a technical or a university degree ensure a stable and well-paying job? Statistics concerning employment in Lebanon indicate that the answer is probably “no.” Today, it is estimated that 25% of Lebanese are unemployed – and of those who are employed, a high number are actually working outside of their fields.1 According to Lebanese Labor Minister Mohammad Kabbara, “30,000-35,000 young people graduate from university every year, but only 5,000 jobs are offered annually, which leaves some 30,000 without a position.”2

Tripoli, Lebanon – Fruit

For a long time, the Lebanese have immigrated to neighboring and distant countries to find better opportunities and ensure a stable future. With a relatively safe atmosphere in recent years (compared to a long history of internal and external wars), the number of Lebanese dreaming of living abroad has not declined. The Lebanese economy is service oriented, with a weak agricultural and industrial sector. This explains the high number of graduates who cannot find suitable jobs in their fields – a problem also seen in the lack of Lebanese labor market guidance offered to students. Combined with the corruption in the public sector and the need to “know someone” in order to attain a job, many of the Lebanese see migration as their best path towards a stable future.

Tripoli, Lebanon – In front of the hotel

The number of Lebanese nationals currently living abroad is around 800,000 – with a diaspora amounting to 14 million in second and third generation descendants – a high number relative to a population of only 4 million. A large percentage of Lebanese rely financially on a family member living abroad; the money that emigrants send back to their families accounts for around 16% of our GDP. For a country whose citizens are known for being proud of belonging to and loving their homeland, these numbers show how alarming the situation has become and how the government fails to implement plans that provide job opportunities to Lebanese and motivate them to stay.

Beirut, Lebanon – Skyline

Another aspect of uncertainty in Lebanon is the perpetual worry that our lives may suddenly fall apart as a result of circumstances that are out of our control. Illness places a huge financial burden on many Lebanese families who do not have health insurance; medical services in Lebanon are expensive and unaffordable for many living in poverty. And facing a car crash is another not-so-rare occurrence: it is difficult to think of someone you know who hasn’t been through one.

Tripoli, Lebanon – On the street

Over the past few years, Beirut has witnessed two incidents of building collapses, resulting in a total of more than 26 deaths. The issue of buildings needing repairs, yet their inhabitants unable to afford them, is a recurring problem in Beirut’s poorer suburbs. The immediate destruction brought on by these incidents paints a clear picture of the lack of security that many of us suffer from.

Beirut, Lebanon – Commenting

Lebanon is classified as a middle-income country—a classification which does not offer much insight into the economic disparities since it does not take into account how the overall income is distributed among the population.3 The latest poverty assessment performed by the UNDP showed that 30% (1.5 million) of the Lebanese population are poor – living on less than four dollars a day. Of those, 300,000 are extremely poor – living on less than two dollars and fifty cents a day and unable to meet their basic food needs.4 On the other hand, 0.3% of the population owns 50% of Lebanon’s wealth, showing how far we have spiraled down the scale of inequality.5

Jounieh, Lebanon – A view

Despite the growing number of people pushed into poverty – a problem made worse by the Syrian refugee crisis – the social services provided by the Lebanese government are still in a primitive stage.6 There is no clear national policy or strategy to help people improve their quality of life or that prevents them from falling deeper into poverty. What has been taking place so far is a set of interventions which usually come in response to a crisis and lack the coordination to achieve an effective, long-lasting goal.

Beirut, Lebanon – Bathing

The current policies only help to keep the poor in a fixed cycle of deprivation they cannot flee. They usually hold jobs of an informal nature, such as ones in agriculture, construction and services (like cleaning, driving and working in shops). These jobs are characterized by their low wages, little to no job security, absence of contracts, and the state of being hired for short or nonconsecutive periods of time. The Syrian refugee crisis added insult to injury, with many of the Syrian refugees going after this type of informal labor, sometimes accepting lower wages than their Lebanese counterparts. This has led to an increase in competition and has pushed more than 200,000 Lebanese out of their jobs, thus causing the poor to be in a perpetual state of uncertainty.7

Tripoli, Lebanon – Bustling

Here in Lebanon, we lack universal healthcare, pension plans for the private sector, long term social security programs, and the list goes on. The available job opportunities cannot accommodate all of Lebanon’s students graduating every year, and many of them end up dreaming of a better future outside of Lebanon. For the poor and middle class in Lebanon, life is never-ending loop of uncertainty and worry. If the government fails to take action soon, the only defining characteristic of our future will be a disaster – and a very certain one.

Ghadir Younes

Footnotes

1. Kadi, Samar. “Lebanon’s youth bearing the brunt of unemployment, regional instability.” The Arab Weekly. August 6, 2017. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: https://thearabweekly.com/lebanons-youth-bearing-brunt-unemployment-regional-instability

2. Kadi, Samar. “Lebanon’s youth bearing the brunt of unemployment, regional instability.” The Arab Weekly. August 6, 2017. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: https://thearabweekly.com/lebanons-youth-bearing-brunt-unemployment-regional-instability

3. Kukrety, Nupur & Jamal, Sarah Al. Poverty, Inequality and Social Protection in Lebanon. Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs. April 2016. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: http://website.aub.edu.lb/ifi/publications/Documents/research_reports/20160426_poverty_inequality.pdf

4. Chadi. “UNDP Latest Poverty Assessment Report: 30% of Lebanese are Poor. Blog Baladi. February 17, 2018. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: http://blogbaladi.com/undp-latest-poverty-assessment-report-30-of-lebanese-are-poor/

5. A Separate State of Mind. “0.3% of Lebanese Own 50% of Lebanon.” February 18, 2015. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: https://stateofmind13.com/2015/02/18/0-3-of-lebanese-own-50-of-lebanon/

6. Kukrety, Nupur & Jamal, Sarah Al. Poverty, Inequality and Social Protection in Lebanon. Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs. April 2016. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: http://website.aub.edu.lb/ifi/publications/Documents/research_reports/20160426_poverty_inequality.pdf

7. The Borgen Project. “Poverty Rate in Lebanon.” August 4, 2017. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: https://borgenproject.org/poverty-rate-in-lebanon/


Credits

Photo 1: Beirut, Lebanon – Reflections – Diego Fiore

Photo 2: Tyre, Lebanon – After the rain – Loes Kieboom

Photo 3: Tripoli, Lebanon – Fruit – Catay

Photo 4: Tripoli, Lebanon – In front of the hotel – Catay

Photo 5: Beirut, Lebanon – Skyline – Diak

Photo 6: Tripoli, Lebanon – On the street – Prdyapim

Photo 7: Beirut, Lebanon – Commenting – Brian Wertheim

Photo 8: Jounieh, Lebanon – A view – Stephanie Crocq

Photo 9: Beirut, Lebanon – Bathing – Bassem Zein

Photo 10: Tripoli, Lebanon – Bustling – Krystel


Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Britain, Poland, China, Argentina, Lebanon, India and other parts of the world…

,.
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Alejandra Baccino Uberti

¿What is it about planning ahead that makes us feel in control? As if nothing could happen outside of our strategically thought-out plan; nothing will make us question everything we always took for granted.

You grow up, you go to school, and if you are lucky you will end up in a job you don´t hate; you find a partner, start una familia… grow old.

Punta del Este, Uruguay – At the park

¿But, what if all this just doesn´t feel quite right? ¿What if, suddenly, it all changes and you are left wondering why this happened to you? We panic. The floor, once so stable, becomes quicksand waiting for a misstep to engulf us whole.

¿Why does the unknown have to be so frightful and negativo? ¿What if, instead, we embraced it as una nueva aventura? ¿Why settle down when you have that little something stirring inside of you, screaming that this life, this plan is just too easy and too dull for you?

Montevideo, Uruguay – Thinking

Finally, you look at your reflection in the mirror and you make una promesa to yourself. You know it won´t be easy and you know that somewhere along the path you will feel pain, you will miss something, you might even regret la decisión. Yet, nonetheless, you forage out into the unknown, with hopes and fears, eagerness and doubts.

Rivadavia, Uruguay – Ignored

Having been born and raised in a third-world country that underwent una enorme crisis económica, uncertainty became a part of my life at an early age. Splurging was out of the question as every peso had to be planned, saved and carefully spent. Your parents had a job and an income until, all of a sudden, they might not anymore. Living at the edge of the abyss while seeing your parents struggle and fearing that the following night your life might change completely, bred una generación of academic over-achievers and people seeking government employment.

Piriapolis, Uruguay – On San Antonio hill

¿What does this mean? Our generación was instilled with la convicción that the more degrees you held, the better your futuro would be. And so we took advantage of free university education and all went and studied for traditional careers. We became accountants, nurses, lawyers y dentistas.

It was too late when we realized that la excelencia académica did not provide any certainty whatsoever regarding the futuro, as the aftermath of the financial crisis kept hitting close to home, with doctors working as taxi drivers and lawyers selling their most precious possessions. The tide shifted then, and the only safe haven became working for the government – a boring, monotonous and unchallenging clerk type of work in the many offices of the many ministerios y agencias of our government. Stamp after stamp, y café tras café, the self-confidence and spirit of self-improvement slowly fading away in exchange for the safety only a civil servant´s job can provide.

Punta del Este. Uruguay – At the bar

As predicted by Ayn Rand, our sociedad started regressing. All those wanting to escape the claws of our dull and corrupt sociedad fled to other countries looking for the excitement and oportunidades they provided.

Over time, la situación financiera improved and stabilized, but even then, that scourge was ingrained so deep within our nature that instead of moving forward we transferred it to different areas. Leaving your job to follow a dream or to travel the world is seen as immature and hippie-like, especially if that job has great health insurance. Not wanting kids is considered selfish and a cause of regret later on in your life. Being suddenly single when you are 30, after ten años in a relationship requires a lot of explaining. ¿And why should I explain myself?

Montevideo, Uruguay – Living

That was el momento when I realized that uncertainty is just a state of mind. Our bagaje cultural y emocional is what makes us scared of it. As certainty is studied in the fields of mathematics, logic and physics; uncertainty is studied from a psychological perspective and the way it affects our emotions and our social behavior. ¿What would happen if we learned to deal with uncertainty the way we deal with certainty, instead of letting it cause so much stress and anxiety? ¿Shouldn´t it be taught as part of the proceso natural of life?

Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay – Hugging

After many tears, when I finally understood that my uncertainty was una circunstancia dinámica instead of una situación estática, I realized that I could finally let out that feeling stirring inside of me, let it take me away and open all the doors available to me. The risks are mine to take, and no one´s to frown upon. As you begin making friends with this uncertainty, you become acquainted with fear, and instead of finding it overwhelm you, it pushes you to be braver than before, to accept that you do not know the future – a liberating and, ultimately, rewarding experience.

Alejandra Baccino Uberti

Credits

Photo 1: Montevideo, Uruguay – Breakwater – DFLC Prints

Photo 2: Punta del Este, Uruguay – At the park – DFLC Prints

Photo 3: Montevideo, Uruguay – Thinking – Mai Rodriguez

Photo 4: Rivadavia, Uruguay – Ignored – Bruno Aguirre

Photo 5: Piriapolis, Uruguay – On San Antonio hill – DFLC Prints

Photo 6: Punta del Este. Uruguay – At the bar – DFLC Prints

Photo 7: Montevideo, Uruguay – Living – DFLC Prints

Photo 8: Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay – Hugging – Don Mammoser

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Britain, Poland, China, Argentina, Lebanon, India and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Kristin Fischer

The average life expectancy in Europe is about 75 years for men and 81 years for women.1 And if you have had the good fortune to be born in Europe, it usually also means that you will have a good lifestyle with free access to general health care, high levels of education, good job opportunities, and generally very few worries when it comes to covering your basic needs and much more. Living in Europe generally means not having to worry about security, famines, natural disasters, or violent political unrest. And if, against all expectations, any of these things do happen, there is usually a quick response system in place to help all people affected. Disease, too, does not seem to be much of an issue any more. Regular check-ups, vaccinations and a healthy lifestyle usually have you covered. And if something does happen, we have got state-of-the-art treatment to take care of it. Human rights, freedom of conscience, expression and religion are all covered. The worst that could happen is you have a bad spell, but then there are social services to help you pick yourself up again.

Cochem, Germany – The afternoon

So, let’s face it, if you are born in Europe – with very few exceptions – life is something you can pretty much take for granted. Correct? Usually, your biggest worry is going to be your own personal happiness. Have you really lived up to your dreams? Did you find the perfect partner/job/home/etc.?

This is the ground you are standing on. The ground we are all standing on. It is where we have firmly planted our feet and expect to take root in.

Nuremberg, Germany – Hanging out

But what if that ground is suddenly pulled away from underneath you? What if one tiny moment means that your life will never be the same again? What happens then to all those promises of life you grew up believing in? To all those dreams you had? To all the plans you made for your future? What if they were all taken away from you to be placed in the hands of others? To be replaced by uncertainty? Would you not feel angry and betrayed? Would you not think that life is unfair? Most of all, would you not think: “Why me?” and “Why now?” What, if nobody can give you an answer to that?

Berlin, Germany – Skeptical

Imagine finding a small lump somewhere on your body. Maybe while sitting in your garden or on a beach applying sun screen. It seems inauspicious and it is probably harmless but why not take a test. Just to be on the safe side. Going to the doctor is no big deal, and a few tests will surely mean you have got nothing to worry about.

But still, this is the point when uncertainty starts creeping in. It is tiny at first, just a minuscule little niggle at the back of your mind, easily drowned out by other thoughts and distractions. Let’s wait for the results first, you tell yourself and off you go to the cinema or a party or a gathering with friends. The niggle starts up again at night, though, softly but persistently nudging itself back into conscious thought. You cannot sleep so you decide to get up and maybe do a little research online to calm your nerves. It’s probably nothing, you are still thinking. Now, mostly to calm yourself.

Berlin, Germany – Up

You do not like what you find online. Angry with yourself and more worried than ever you slam your computer shut. You will not be sleeping tonight.

Imagine now that you are going to your doctor to find out the results of the test. Imagine him or her looking at you with a grave face. A queasy feeling starts rising up inside your stomach. Your palms start to sweat. You are hoping against hope that they are going to tell you that you are fine. That you have nothing to worry about. That everything is going to be okay. But shouldn’t they be smiling then? Why are they looking so grave? Why aren’t they smiling?

Berlin, Germany – Oberbaumbrücke

And then they say it: “I am afraid it is cancer.” Six words to end your life. You do not even hear the rest of what they are saying. You have already tumbled and fallen. And you keep falling. It turns out the ground you were standing on was not firm at all. It was just a very thin and threadbare rug covering a big black bottomless hole underneath. The hole you are now falling down. How could you not have seen it? Not known of its existence all this time? Your thoughts start spinning. Isn’t cancer supposed to be something that only affects elderly people? Why else would they only start most cancer screenings at the age of 50? You might have heard about someone who had cancer in your vicinity. But they were probably someone’s grandfather or grandmother. And anyway, it really isn’t a subject anyone ever talked about, is it now?

Kempen, Germany – Out for a walk

Slowly, your doctor’s words get through to you. They are very faint and seem to be coming from a long way off. They are talking about further tests and treatment options and life expectancy. But all you can think about is “Why me?”, “Why now?”, “What about my dreams and plans?”, “What about my life?”, and “What do I tell the others?”

Nuremberg, Germany – Reading

Cancer “is the second largest cause of death in the EU-28.”2 Increasingly it affects young people between the ages of 20 and 35, especially women. Yet it is still a taboo subject in many parts of society. This means that on top of having to deal with a potentially life-threatening disease as well as long, drawn-out, and potentially life-changing treatments, people are also feeling excluded from society and sometimes even from their own families because they feel too ashamed to talk about it. It is time to lift the stigma on one of the biggest uncertainties potentially affecting our lives today. Let’s talk about cancer.

Kristin Fischer

End notes / References:

“Average life expectancy in Europe for those born in 2017, by gender and region (in years)”, Statistica.com 2018 https://www.statista.com/statistics/274514/life-expectancy-in-europe/ (02/05/2018)

“Cancer statistics”, Eurostat – statistics explained http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Cancer_statistics (02/05/2018)

Credits

Photo 1: Cochem, Germany – The afternoon – Fred Young

Photo 2: Nuremberg, Germany – Hanging out -Tivanova

Photo 3: Berlin, Germany – Skeptical – Frantic

Photo 4: Berlin, Germany – Up – Andreas Kind-1280×720

Photo 5: Berlin, Germany – Oberbaumbrücke – Björn Grochla

Photo 6: Kempen, Germany – Out for a walk – Rieke Photos

Photo 7: Nuremberg, Germany – Reading – Tivanova

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Uruguay, Britain, Poland, China, Argentina, Lebanon, India and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Sebastião Sem

Life in Portugal isn’t fraught with incerteza. I’m sure that many of my conterrâneos, my fellow countrymen and women, would vehemently disagree. We’re a people of pessimists by nature, and, not unlike other people, we tend towards being very critical of our own country, our terra. Despite this, I often feel like I am an optimist, which might help to explain my opening statement, but I also feel that I arrive at that optimism by a sort of essentially pessimistic way of thinking, by going over the top, as it were – «if it’s all pointless, why not try to give it a good go, right?»

Viano Do Castelo, Portugal – Cell-walking

Getting back to my original point, people in Portugal aren’t subject to any more uncertainty than people anywhere else in the developed world. The national public healthcare system – the Serviço Nacional de Saúde, or SNS as we usually call it – for all its issues, is fairly good, despite being chronically underfunded (but then again, what public healthcare system isn’t?). The fear of crime and violence is also almost non-existent, and those two things seem mostly limited to certain urban pockets, well-known and thus easily avoidable for most.

Lisbon, Portugal – On the street

The big uncertainty in most people’s lives is, undoubtedly, the economy. We’re fresh out of the biggest economic depression in our lives, hopefully. The greatest manifestation of this economic anxiety in Portugal was, and continues to be, the emigration of literally hundreds of thousands of young people. Economic anxiety, although apt, is maybe not the best descriptor: what I’m talking about is really uncertainty in regard to opportunity. In the aftermath of 2008, there was a widespread feeling that opportunities in Portugal were lacking in several ways. They were, for one, literally lacking, that is, there was a huge shortage of employment. But an important factor was also the quality of the opportunities that did exist. My generation is, without a shadow of a doubt, the most highly-educated in Portuguese history, but qualified workers who remained in Portugal often had to take jobs outside of their field of expertise. And if they did find work in their chosen field, they were forced to accept very poor working conditions and an almost complete lack of job security.

Lisbon, Portugal – Cutting railway

These days there’s a huge cloud looming over all of us. I am, of course, talking about inteligência artificial, AI. Obviously, this isn’t an issue restricted solely to Portugal. But, perhaps because we didn’t really have our own Luddites, some of us have yet to learn that fundamental lesson: there is just no stopping progress. Although I am by no means a neo-Luddite, I think it’s fairly easy to empathize with those who happen to be. Besides the obvious and understandable fear for one’s livelihood, which could certainly be put at risk if we don’t change our economic systems to safeguard against the “rise of the machines” (pardon the cliché), each and every one of us is a product of how we were raised and educated. And if you’re raised and educated to work for a living, the idea of AI, even if we do manage to make the utopian turn, is somewhat frightening. I think most people, and I include myself in this group, don’t really know what they’d do with themselves if all our efforts were absolutely pointless. I feel a wave of ennui washing over me just thinking about it.

Funchal, Portugal – Questions

Portugal has a long history of great utopian thinkers who might be of service to help us envision and cope with the idea of a workless society. There is a line of thinking in Portuguese intellectual history which started with Padre António Vieira. António Vieira is the originator of the myth of the so-called Quinto Império, the Fifth Empire. This spiritual empire would be the culmination of progress, and it would be led by the Portuguese. The idea was later taken up by Fernando Pessoa, one of our greatest poetas (and by “our” here I mean humanity’s). Its most recent proponent of note was Professor Agostinho da Silva, a figure who, despite being an absolute rock star in his time (as we would say in ours), isn’t as well known today as he maybe should be.

Portugal – Fernando Pessoa

In a way, it gives me some comfort knowing that what I’m about to discuss was originally said in the early 90s. It proves that people have been giving thought to what a post-scarcity society might look like for a long time. As I was saying, in the early 90s Professor Agostinho da Silva talked about how people would soon be born into retirement. He envisioned a society of so-called vagrant poets (the expression he originally used in Portuguese, poetas vadios, isn’t completely captured by my translation, which seems almost cliché, whereas the Portuguese is rather more layered, not to mention beautiful). My hope is that those born to be vagrant poets, the generations who will be in retirement from the moment they appear in this world will be able to live without feeling that they need to work in order to justify living, which I feel is the case for most of us. Professor Agostinho da Silva also said that all men are poems and, hopefully, that’s what AI will do: let our descendants live their lives as poems.

Portimao, Portugal – Watching the river

Besides pessimism, there’s one other thing that usually characterizes the Portuguese. It’s a skill which, during the age of sailing, meant that every ship tried to enlist a Portuguese sailor (this may or may not be apocryphal). It’s our ability to desenrascar – a tough word to translate. Essentially, it means “to macgyver” (an actual English verb), that is, to get out of impossible situations with very few resources. It is easy to imagine how that would come in handy on a wooden ship traveling to unknown lands, but I mention this because, even if things aren’t as peachy as one would like after the arrival of AI in full force, I have faith in humanity’s ability to desenrascar, to macgyver our way around it. And if a Fifth Empire is in the cards, it’ll certainly be an Império do Desenrascanço. Perhaps that’s what Padre António Vieira, Fernando Pessoa and Agostinho da Silva were talking about all along.

Sebastião Sem

Credits

Photo 1:  Lisbon, Portugal – Reliefs – NVPhoto

Photo 2: Viano Do Castelo, Portugal – Cell-walking – Mimohe

Photo 3: Lisbon, Portugal – On the street – Franz

Photo 4: Lisbon, Portugal – Cutting railway – Ruben Ramos

Photo 5: Funchal, Portugal – Questions – Luis Pina Photography

Photo 6: Portugal – Fernando Pessoa – Vitoriano Braga

Photo 7: Portimao, Portugal – Watching the river – Mauro Rodrigues

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Uruguay, Germany, Britain, Poland, China, Argentina, Lebanon, India and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Emblem tranpoзиция by Aleksandar Protić

The topic I wish to address here is a rather local one, yet the underlying issue seems to be universal. My story will address an environmental kind of uncertainty, the juxtaposition of short and medium term gains and long term losses. The origin of the story lies in a narrow geographical context, but the message it sends resonates globally. I said it is a local issue because it revolves around a small river in western Serbia, some 70 km long, distinguished not only by its hardly pronounceable name – Veliki Rzav – but by some much more significant qualities as well. The river itself flows out of the confluence of two smaller rivers, Jančica and Presečka, running down the slopes of an unindustrialized mountainous area near the town of Ivanjica. Flowing through a series of scenic canyons and gorges surrounded by oak and beech forests, it is home to a wide range of plants and animals including several rare species of fish.

Serbia – Veliki Rzav by night 

I tend to be very critical of my fellow countrymen’s environmental awareness, that is, the lack of it – because plastic bags, empty bottles and even broken home appliances scattered along riversides are unfortunately not an uncommon sight in Serbia. However, what we have here is quite the opposite. The entire course of Veliki Rzav is in fact unpolluted. It is so clean you can actually drink the water straight from the river. No boiling, filtering – and no stomach problems either – you just lean over and take a handful of the cold, crystal-clear water. Mind you, this state is not a result of mere isolation, but rather of active preservation.

Serbia – Shallow waters of Veliki Rzav

Most of the riverside is easily accessible, and near the town of Arilje it even includes several smaller beaches. Veliki Rzav offers opportunities for swimming (if you can stand the cold), fishing, camping, rafting or simply enjoying the scenery. These qualities naturally attract a fair amount of people every year, but the frequency of activities on and along the river is fortunately not accompanied by a correspondingly high degree of pollution – there is virtually none. One of the reasons for this may be the fact that the people living around Veliki Rzav are very conscious of what they have, and with a great sense of pride they are doing their best to keep it as untainted as possible. And they seem to be doing a pretty good job because Veliki Rzav is officially the cleanest river in Serbia, and most likely one of the cleanest rivers in Europe (it is often compared to the neighboring Montenegro river of Tara, which is actually the cleanest river in Europe and one of the 5 cleanest rivers on the planet1).

Serbia – Veliki Rzav rapids

However, the lovely picture I have just painted will soon become just a hard to believe memory – and that is not because the locals will suddenly decide to start dumping trash and sewage waste into the water. The changes we are about to witness will be a result of a rather more “humane” action. The story goes as follows: the banks of Veliki Rzav are currently undergoing a “geological transformation” at the hands of heavy machinery, as part of a project involving the construction of a series of dams that will effectively cut up the river and divide it into a series of reservoir lakes, thus radically altering the entire landscape and its ecosystem.

Serbia – Work in progress Stripped-down mountain side along Veliki Rzav

The rationale behind this project is that the reservoirs are supposed to provide an additional supply of water for several neighboring towns, although they currently do not lack it and probably never will, as the area’s population is generally either stagnating or declining. The plan itself was first drawn up almost 40 years ago (back in 19792) and was lying forgotten in some drawer until recently, when private investors and corrupt government officials saw the opportunity to satisfy their financial interests by declaring them public interests. So they set out to implement the dam construction project based on demographic and technical data and environmental standards from 40 years ago. The bottom line is that nobody (besides the ones getting the taxpayer’s money to implement it) really wants the change; it is highly questionable whether we actually need it, but the project got the green light, the machinery is out in the field, the money was transferred from account A to account B, and that is all that matters. The construction (destruction would be a more suitable term) work has been underway for the past 6 years, in spite of vocal protests by the local communities and environmental groups, despite numerous warnings about the plan’s short-sightedness and less aggressive alternatives proposed by independent experts.3 Nevertheless, all the efforts of well-intentioned people have been in vain, as our modern, capital-driven democracy seems to be a system that guarantees you the right to say whatever you want, but does not guarantee that anybody is going to listen.

Serbia – Intact nature replaced by reinforced concrete

Once the work is completed and the system of dams becomes operational, it will bring about the following: water pollution, the flooding of several adjacent archaeological sites, a drastic alteration of the ecosystem in and along the river, a substantial reduction in water temperature, reduced oxygen levels in the water, the dying out of certain species of fish, the appearance of toxic algae and the accumulation of toxic sludge, an increased risk of floods and landslides and the alteration of the surrounding area’s microclimate.4 And last but not least, all dams are designed and built to last for a certain period of time – 50, 70, maybe even 100 years. However, once that period expires, we may no longer have a dam, we will most certainly no longer have the river we now have, but we may be confronted with some serious problems instead. However, those problems will bother some future generations, so everything is fine – or at least that is what the dam construction advocates count on.

Serbia – River canyon

This example may or may not be unique, but it is by no means isolated. Neither here in Serbia, nor in the rest of the world. Even in this era of big, fancy environmental conferences, the aggressive promotion of so-called “green” technologies, we are still very creative when it comes to mutilating the only home we have. We are doing it on a daily basis by dumping radioactive waste into oceans, by releasing islands of used plastic to float around the planet, we are doing it by deforestation, by clogging rivers with garbage and destroying the water and soil with pesticides and toxic waste, by exterminating entire species. We are rapidly shrinking the natural habitat of animals, plants and even indigenous people – who are the ones doing the least harm to our planet, yet ironically, have absolutely no say in deciding its future.

Serbia – Open

Perhaps, and only perhaps, there is something inherently wrong with the way we, civilized humans, are treating the world we live in. It seems the “buy-use-toss” mantra has set its roots so deeply in our throw-away society’s consciousness that we have started applying it to all aspects of existence. Instead of spending billions on trying to figure out how to colonize Mars,5 maybe it would be a better idea to put more effort into preventing our (still) perfectly functional planet from becoming Mars 2. If the Earth could speak, I think it would hardly have anything positive to say about “the most intelligent” life form inhabiting it. On second thought, I think it has been telling us a lot, but instead of listening, we chose playing deaf. Maybe it would be worth stopping for a moment and giving it a thought. Otherwise, we may soon learn that George Carlin was spot on when he uttered his famous “Don’t worry, the planet is not going anywhere, we are!”6

Aleksandar Protić

Footnotes

1. Green Diary. “5 Cleanest rivers in the World.” Retrieved on August 23: https://greendiary.com/5-cleanest-rivers-world.html

2. Večernje Novosti. “Nestaje Rzav, poslednja nezagađena reka Srbije.” Retrieved on August 23: http://www.novosti.rs/vesti/naslovna/reportaze/aktuelno.293.html:390866-Nestaje-Rzav—poslednja-nezagadjena-reka-Srbije

3. I. Nikolić, D. Mitrović. “Rzav Veliki” (2016). Retrieved on August 23: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31h3P5vs7aw&t=1042s

4. Tifran. “Veliki Rzav – posledice gradnje brana.” Retrieved on August 23: http://www.tifran.org/clanci/veliki-rzav-posledice-gradnje-brana

5. The Guardian. “Elon Musk: we must colonise Mars to preserve our species in a third world war.” Retrieved on August 23: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/mar/11/elon-musk-colonise-mars-third-world-war

6. Carlin, George. “The Planet is Fine”. Retrieved on August 23: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHgJKrmbYfg

Credits

Photo 1: Serbia – Mountain river – Janus

Photo 2: Serbia – Veliki Rzav by night – Goran Bogdanović

Photo 3: Serbia – Shallow waters of Veliki Rzav – Goran Bogdanović

Photo 4: Serbia – Veliki Rzav rapids – Goran Bogdanović

Photo 5: Serbia – Work in progress Stripped-down mountain side along Veliki Rzav – Hidrotehnika

Photo 6: Serbia – Intact nature replaced by reinforced concrete – Hidrotehnikia

Photo 7: Serbia – River canyon – Igor Sinkov

Photo 8: Serbia – Open – Damian

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Uruguay, Portugal, Germany, Britain, Poland, China, Argentina, Lebanon, India and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Emblem transpoзиция by Anastasiya Zakharova

What is your first thought when someone talks about Russia nowadays? Let me guess. In all likelihood they say that it has unstable or negative relations with about one-fifth of the countries in the world.

Living in Russia, we don’t know what to expect from one day to the next. Having a stable job especially in an international company doesn’t mean that we will not be forced to look for another position a few weeks later. We can never be certain that the sector won’t be subject to sanctions in the near future.1 The same thing is the case with products where we had to abandon some European ones that we got used to.

Nowadays the situation has become even more unpredictable – it is as if the civil population should be preparing for war, but the war I want to talk about is different. It is an internal war, a figurative one, in society.

Syktyvkar, Russia – A man in autumn

After the Russian “Gay Propaganda Act” was passed in 2013, we saw a change in society’s attitude. Before the law, people were more neutral to same-sex interaction, but the passing of the law has made it seem like a negative attitude has developed with respect to homosexuals, and the number of crimes has risen.2 There are also groups that attack homosexuals. An example of this is when community participants meet online with homosexuals, then meet in real life and assault them.3 These organizations are in different regions of Russia with different intentions, from extortion to murder. The worst thing here is that not only an aggressive attitude has appeared in the aftermath of this law, but the police do not want to react to such cases. In this context we cannot stay calm if we don’t know how people will react to a confession.

Saint Petersburg, Russia – Ahead

The new law has caused lots of people to shift from neutral to negative. There is always tension when talking about ourselves. We have to decide whether we can tell our colleagues the truth about our partner and be free in conversation. We may have to change our job even if we like it.4 Furthermore, we have to counter efforts where people look for homosexuals in particular and force them to leave their job, particularly if it is connected with children. Finally, it is also possible for people to be fired just because of their sexual orientation.5

Kazan, Russia – Teenagers
It is even harder with families, as it is common to have a family of a husband and wife, and any deviation from the standard is very harmful. Our people are not as progressive as they are in Europe or other countries in regard to relationships so there will be a long road to acceptance by relatives after revealing homosexuality. In many cases, parents do not accept it until the end and hope for a “regular” family to appear one day. Sometimes there are radical families, which is more common in the southern regions, where relatives “hunt” their children.6
Saint Petersburg, Russia – Up close

In our society it is still strange for people to observe a same-sex pair hugging or kissing. In public places, this prompts disapproving glances and comments. It is very hard to find people with whom we can talk frankly without being laughed at. In big cities like Moscow and St. Petersburg, the situation is better since people are more progressive. To some extent, it depends on the general development of the city, both in technical and social terms. Big cities are international; everything is in flux, with different opinions and experiences. They are full of new information and motion, bringing them closer to international trends and subject to influence. And thanks to the internet, we have access to any information we want, although some websites devoted to homosexuals are being closed because they allegedly engage in “propaganda” despite their intention being to help homosexuals find any help or information they need.

Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia – In

It is important to have access to good information online so people can know the truth. People have to know that homosexuality doesn’t mean that there is something wrong with a person, but that it is a normal process that starts to unfold in the body of the woman while pregnant. When people do not know about this, there is always a high level of homophobia.

Sevastopol, Russia – At the market

Nowadays the church is playing a bigger role in society. The Orthodox church has become more powerful in recent years. New churches have been built instead of kindergartens. Last year, a plan was even announced to build new Orthodox kindergartens.7 The stronger the church, the more powerful its message for the people. The Patriarch’s speeches have caused lots of religious people to dislike homosexuals. According to the Orthodox church, homosexuality is unnatural, which is why it has to be fixed, and they say that it is possible with the church’s help.8 Even if their position is unscientific, people still believe them.

Zavodoukovsk, Russia – On the beach

The church’s view and the mood in society have driven people to leave Russia for other places. This is not just based on observation. According to the Federal State Statistics Service,9 there has been a dramatic increase in emigration since 2012 (almost three times higher in 2016 and nine times higher than in 2011). These numbers show the rise in people’s distrust of the government.

Moscow, Russia – At the crossing

The picture of uncertainty in Russia is not very pretty, and the official numbers prove this. Now that the government has decided to make tough rules, people want to move to other countries. We do not believe that life will get better, even if we protest against the new laws. Since we have such discontent citizens, this means that Russia still has to make lots of changes. We hope that one day we can be free in the choice of our partner, and we can say that Russian society is tolerant of our choice.

Anastasiya Zakharova

Footnotes

1. Шашина, Ольга. “Лекарство от санкций: к чему приведет запрет товаров из США.” BBC Русская Служба. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: http://www.bbc.com/russian/amp/features-43756120

2. “Десятки умирают только потому, что они геи.” Lenta.ru. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://lenta.ru/articles/2017/09/25/gey/

3. “В обществе усилилась агрессия к ЛГБТ” Коммерсантъ. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://www.kommersant.ru/doc/2995788

4. “Уволенная за гомосексуальность учительница обратилась в суд.” РБК. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://www.rbc.ru/spb_sz/27/05/2015/5592b74c9a7947f6f764ac38

5. Владимирова, Виктория. “МЧС уволило лесбиянку за каминг-аут.” Сноб. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://snob.ru/selected/entry/95680

6. Баданин, Роман. “«Господин Путин, вы нормально спите ночами?»: рассказ «первого» чеченского трансгендера, сумевшего выжить и сбежать в США.” Дожд. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://tvrain.ru/teleshow/reportazh/leila-434953/

7. “Святейший Патриарх Кирилл: Важно открывать новые приходские детские сады.” Русская Православная Церковь. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: http://www.patriarchia.ru/db/text/5046065.html

8. “В РПЦ заявили, что церковь может исправить ориентацию геев.” Россия сегодня. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://ria.ru/religion/20180218/1514880841.html

9. Федеральная служба государственной статистики. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: http://www.gks.ru

Credits

Photo 1: Magadan, Russia – Soon – Artem Kovalev

Photo 2: Syktyvkar, Russia – A man in autumn – Aleksandr Potashev

Photo 3: Saint Petersburg, Russia – Ahead – Mark Alexandrovich

Photo 4: Kazan, Russia – Teenagers – Tatiana Nefedova

Photo 5: Saint Petersburg, Russia – Up close – Mark Alexandrovich

Photo 6: Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia – In – Timofey Logachev

Photo 7: Sevastopol, Russia – At the market – Fancycrave

Photo 8: Zavodoukovsk, Russia – On the beach – Anatoliy Matveychuk

Photo 9: Moscow, Russia – At the crossing – Alexander Popov

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Britain, Portugal, Serbia, Germany, India and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Emblem transpoзиция by Anastasiya Zakharova

What is your first thought when someone talks about Russia nowadays? Let me guess. In all likelihood they say that it has unstable or negative relations with about one-fifth of the countries in the world.

Living in Russia, we don’t know what to expect from one day to the next. Having a stable job especially in an international company doesn’t mean that we will not be forced to look for another position a few weeks later. We can never be certain that the sector won’t be subject to sanctions in the near future.1 The same thing is the case with products where we had to abandon some European ones that we got used to.

Nowadays the situation has become even more unpredictable – it is as if the civil population should be preparing for war, but the war I want to talk about is different. It is an internal war, a figurative one, in society.

Syktyvkar, Russia – A man in autumn

After the Russian “Gay Propaganda Act” was passed in 2013, we saw a change in society’s attitude. Before the law, people were more neutral to same-sex interaction, but the passing of the law has made it seem like a negative attitude has developed with respect to homosexuals, and the number of crimes has risen.2 There are also groups that attack homosexuals. An example of this is when community participants meet online with homosexuals, then meet in real life and assault them.3 These organizations are in different regions of Russia with different intentions, from extortion to murder. The worst thing here is that not only an aggressive attitude has appeared in the aftermath of this law, but the police do not want to react to such cases. In this context we cannot stay calm if we don’t know how people will react to a confession.

Saint Petersburg, Russia – Ahead

The new law has caused lots of people to shift from neutral to negative. There is always tension when talking about ourselves. We have to decide whether we can tell our colleagues the truth about our partner and be free in conversation. We may have to change our job even if we like it.4 Furthermore, we have to counter efforts where people look for homosexuals in particular and force them to leave their job, particularly if it is connected with children. Finally, it is also possible for people to be fired just because of their sexual orientation.5

Kazan, Russia – Teenagers
It is even harder with families, as it is common to have a family of a husband and wife, and any deviation from the standard is very harmful. Our people are not as progressive as they are in Europe or other countries in regard to relationships so there will be a long road to acceptance by relatives after revealing homosexuality. In many cases, parents do not accept it until the end and hope for a “regular” family to appear one day. Sometimes there are radical families, which is more common in the southern regions, where relatives “hunt” their children.6
Saint Petersburg, Russia – Up close

In our society it is still strange for people to observe a same-sex pair hugging or kissing. In public places, this prompts disapproving glances and comments. It is very hard to find people with whom we can talk frankly without being laughed at. In big cities like Moscow and St. Petersburg, the situation is better since people are more progressive. To some extent, it depends on the general development of the city, both in technical and social terms. Big cities are international; everything is in flux, with different opinions and experiences. They are full of new information and motion, bringing them closer to international trends and subject to influence. And thanks to the internet, we have access to any information we want, although some websites devoted to homosexuals are being closed because they allegedly engage in “propaganda” despite their intention being to help homosexuals find any help or information they need.

Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia – In

It is important to have access to good information online so people can know the truth. People have to know that homosexuality doesn’t mean that there is something wrong with a person, but that it is a normal process that starts to unfold in the body of the woman while pregnant. When people do not know about this, there is always a high level of homophobia.

Sevastopol, Russia – At the market

Nowadays the church is playing a bigger role in society. The Orthodox church has become more powerful in recent years. New churches have been built instead of kindergartens. Last year, a plan was even announced to build new Orthodox kindergartens.7 The stronger the church, the more powerful its message for the people. The Patriarch’s speeches have caused lots of religious people to dislike homosexuals. According to the Orthodox church, homosexuality is unnatural, which is why it has to be fixed, and they say that it is possible with the church’s help.8 Even if their position is unscientific, people still believe them.

Zavodoukovsk, Russia – On the beach

The church’s view and the mood in society have driven people to leave Russia for other places. This is not just based on observation. According to the Federal State Statistics Service,9 there has been a dramatic increase in emigration since 2012 (almost three times higher in 2016 and nine times higher than in 2011). These numbers show the rise in people’s distrust of the government.

Moscow, Russia – At the crossing

The picture of uncertainty in Russia is not very pretty, and the official numbers prove this. Now that the government has decided to make tough rules, people want to move to other countries. We do not believe that life will get better, even if we protest against the new laws. Since we have such discontent citizens, this means that Russia still has to make lots of changes. We hope that one day we can be free in the choice of our partner, and we can say that Russian society is tolerant of our choice.

Anastasiya Zakharova

Footnotes

1. Шашина, Ольга. “Лекарство от санкций: к чему приведет запрет товаров из США.” BBC Русская Служба. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: http://www.bbc.com/russian/amp/features-43756120

2. “Десятки умирают только потому, что они геи.” Lenta.ru. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://lenta.ru/articles/2017/09/25/gey/

3. “В обществе усилилась агрессия к ЛГБТ” Коммерсантъ. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://www.kommersant.ru/doc/2995788

4. “Уволенная за гомосексуальность учительница обратилась в суд.” РБК. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://www.rbc.ru/spb_sz/27/05/2015/5592b74c9a7947f6f764ac38

5. Владимирова, Виктория. “МЧС уволило лесбиянку за каминг-аут.” Сноб. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://snob.ru/selected/entry/95680

6. Баданин, Роман. “«Господин Путин, вы нормально спите ночами?»: рассказ «первого» чеченского трансгендера, сумевшего выжить и сбежать в США.” Дожд. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://tvrain.ru/teleshow/reportazh/leila-434953/

7. “Святейший Патриарх Кирилл: Важно открывать новые приходские детские сады.” Русская Православная Церковь. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: http://www.patriarchia.ru/db/text/5046065.html

8. “В РПЦ заявили, что церковь может исправить ориентацию геев.” Россия сегодня. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: https://ria.ru/religion/20180218/1514880841.html

9. Федеральная служба государственной статистики. Retrieved on August 16, 2018: http://www.gks.ru

Credits

Photo 1: Magadan, Russia – Soon – Artem Kovalev

Photo 2: Syktyvkar, Russia – A man in autumn – Aleksandr Potashev

Photo 3: Saint Petersburg, Russia – Ahead – Mark Alexandrovich

Photo 4: Kazan, Russia – Teenagers – Tatiana Nefedova

Photo 5: Saint Petersburg, Russia – Up close – Mark Alexandrovich

Photo 6: Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia – In – Timofey Logachev

Photo 7: Sevastopol, Russia – At the market – Fancycrave

Photo 8: Zavodoukovsk, Russia – On the beach – Anatoliy Matveychuk

Photo 9: Moscow, Russia – At the crossing – Alexander Popov

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Britain, Portugal, Serbia, Germany, India and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpoзиция by Cristina Cajoto

As puzzling as it may sound, I have needed years to realize that uncertainty governs nuestras vidas. This was a shocking discovery at first, I felt confundido and eventually apathetic: ¿Why bother to strive if el futuro was not in my hands? Luckily, that defeatist attitude did not last long, and it eventually occurred to me that we do have control over nuestras vidas, as we govern our reacción towards whatever fate decides to bring upon us.

Madrid, Spain – Enlightened

As a kid, I took everything for granted. Mi familia, mis amigos, mi casa… It was all I ever knew, and I thought it would stay unchanged until I grew up and replaced those things with my own: familia, amigos, casa… That is how it was meant to be.

Calp, Spain – Stairway to…

The first sign that things could get off track was el divorcio of my friend’s parents. All the changes in her life, which I had not contemplated before, made me comprender that things could indeed go unexpectedly.

A few years later, another friend’s dad lost su trabajo. For some time she had very little or no pocket money.

A third friend’s grandma/second mom passed away at a quite young age. La familia was devastated.

Valencia, Spain – Under water

By la adolescencia, I understood that things can go awry. Sometimes I had to avoid this thought, as I was a bit overwhelmed by the fact that my life could be stricken by such changes dramáticos as the ones I had witnessed among mis amigos.

Little did I know at that young age, I would only comprehend the full meaning of uncertainty when I became a mom.

Madrid, Spain – A couple

When another person’s life completely depends on you, uncertainty attains una nueva dimensión. ¿What if my child is not healthy? ¿What if I cannot provide for him or her? ¿What if I become sick or even die? ¿What if some other tragedia affects us? ¿What if my child is not a happy one? ¿What if he or she is not a good student? ¿What if I do not have the time as a working mom to properly raise him or her? ¿What if my kids do not get along? ¿What if my kid does not become a successful adulto? All those what-ifs started haunting me…

Barcelona, Spain – La Sagrada Familia

I consider myself a fighter and I soon decided that I would try and truly live the unique experience that is motherhood (y la vida en general), instead of just passing through it haunted by my fears. The question was how to do it.

Luckily, la vida, el destino, fate, uncertainty or whatever it is called put in my path some inspiring personas that had gracefully made their way through the most difficult situaciones to prove that we do have some control over our happiness. (I wonder if we are actually always surrounded by inspiring people, but are unable to realize the model they are…)

Barcelona, Spain – Onward

A friend that I have known for quite a few years once gave me an important life lesson. I already knew she was bright and had a special ability to make everyone feel content, both in her personal y professional sphere; however, the way she managed to redo her life in a foreign country, hundreds of miles away from home (family, friends, house, job, community), due to an unfortunate situación legal, simply amazed me. In just a few months, she had found a new job where she soon became a valued member and had built up a new support system.

Barcelona, Spain – Looking

When we lost a friend in his thirties due to un accidente a few years ago, the way his mother overcame this loss y the passing away of her husband just a year later was truly inspiring. She chose to be thankful for having had them in her life instead of lamenting having lost them. I believe this attitude was un factor determinante in her speedy recovery from grief.

Barcelona, Spain – Continuing
The serious disease that my husband’s cousin’s kid suffered (fortunately, he has now recovered) was also a milestone in this learning curve. The parents (who up until then seemed to me padres regulares, with their strengths y weaknesses) showed an infatigable, fierce attitude during the long stay el hospital and in making sure that their other child en casa would not suffer any major changes in her life.
Madrid, Spain – Together

I now believe that your attitude is the key. Obviamente, when such an earthquake shakes your whole world, your primera reacción is to give in to desesperación, as it is common to have ups y downs along the way. But it becomes essential to work towards a positive attitude en general.

En mi opinión, positivity is a sign of a healthy mind. And a healthy mind, the same as a healthy body, is something that needs to be constantly nurtured.

I will use the Roman saying Mens sana in corpore sano to introduce el primer método for a healthy mind: taking care of your body. Healthy eating, exercising y sleeping well are known to contribute to a healthy body, but they also contribute to a healthy mind, as body y mind (some call it soul) are nothing but two aspects of the same reality.

Barcelona, Spain – Intersecting

Secondly, I think it is vital to build a strong support system (I give my friend before credit for the expression support system). If you have truly dear familia y amigos in your life, they will be there for you in bad times. They will probably help physically (for example, if they are geographically close), but will definitely help psicológicamente, by listening, comforting, advising… However, in order to receive this kind of support in bad times, make sure to cultivate your personal relationships en los buenos tiempos.

Madrid, Spain – Fun

Finally, look for the beauty en la vida, I mean, try to find those little things that will make you happy even if it is just for a minute. That can help you escape the sorrow y pain you may be immersed in. It may be taking a walk by the sea or watching a film in your favorite genre or cooking y eating a nice meal or reading a good book (these are my choices, but las posibilidades are endless). Just make sure you pick your choice beforehand, so that you know what resource to use when you need it most.

Canary Islands, Spain – At sunrise

Age brings awareness de la realidad, thus crushing the innocence of los primeros años; however, for those who choose to reflect on the topic, it also provides a deeper comprensión of life. La vida is uncertain (random, fragile…); once this is understood y accepted, it only makes sense to live it on a daily basis and with an attitude positiva, whatever shade it acquires.

Credits

Photo 1: Seville, Spain – Mirrored – Christian Battaglia

Photo 2: Madrid, Spain – Enlightened – Tobias Messer

Photo 3: Calp, Spain – Stairway to… – Beasty

Photo 4: Valencia, Spain – Under water – Janis Skribans

Photo 5: Madrid, Spain – A couple – RadKha

Photo 6: Barcelona, Spain – La Sagrada Familia – Rishabh Varshney

Photo 7: Barcelona, Spain – Onward – Lerner Vadim

Photo 8: Barcelona, Spain – Looking – Lerner Vadim

Photo 9: Barcelona, Spain – Continuing – Lerner Vadim

Photo 10: Madrid, Spain – Together – RadKha

Photo 11: Barcelona, Spain – Intersecting – Anatasiia Tarasova

Photo 12: Madrid, Spain – Fun – goga

Photo 13: Canary Islands, Spain – At sunrise – Rott

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Russia, Britain, Portugal, Serbia, Germany, India and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Emblem transpoзиция by Cristina Cajoto

As puzzling as it may sound, I have needed years to realize that uncertainty governs nuestras vidas. This was a shocking discovery at first, I felt confundido and eventually apathetic: ¿Why bother to strive if el futuro was not in my hands? Luckily, that defeatist attitude did not last long, and it eventually occurred to me that we do have control over nuestras vidas, as we govern our reacción towards whatever fate decides to bring upon us.

Madrid, Spain – Enlightened

As a kid, I took everything for granted. Mi familia, mis amigos, mi casa… It was all I ever knew, and I thought it would stay unchanged until I grew up and replaced those things with my own: familia, amigos, casa… That is how it was meant to be.

Calp, Spain – Stairway to…

The first sign that things could get off track was el divorcio of my friend’s parents. All the changes in her life, which I had not contemplated before, made me comprender that things could indeed go unexpectedly.

A few years later, another friend’s dad lost su trabajo. For some time she had very little or no pocket money.

A third friend’s grandma/second mom passed away at a quite young age. La familia was devastated.

Valencia, Spain – Under water

By la adolescencia, I understood that things can go awry. Sometimes I had to avoid this thought, as I was a bit overwhelmed by the fact that my life could be stricken by such changes dramáticos as the ones I had witnessed among mis amigos.

Little did I know at that young age, I would only comprehend the full meaning of uncertainty when I became a mom.

Madrid, Spain – A couple

When another person’s life completely depends on you, uncertainty attains una nueva dimensión. ¿What if my child is not healthy? ¿What if I cannot provide for him or her? ¿What if I become sick or even die? ¿What if some other tragedia affects us? ¿What if my child is not a happy one? ¿What if he or she is not a good student? ¿What if I do not have the time as a working mom to properly raise him or her? ¿What if my kids do not get along? ¿What if my kid does not become a successful adulto? All those what-ifs started haunting me…

Barcelona, Spain – La Sagrada Familia

I consider myself a fighter and I soon decided that I would try and truly live the unique experience that is motherhood (y la vida en general), instead of just passing through it haunted by my fears. The question was how to do it.

Luckily, la vida, el destino, fate, uncertainty or whatever it is called put in my path some inspiring personas that had gracefully made their way through the most difficult situaciones to prove that we do have some control over our happiness. (I wonder if we are actually always surrounded by inspiring people, but are unable to realize the model they are…)

Barcelona, Spain – Onward

A friend that I have known for quite a few years once gave me an important life lesson. I already knew she was bright and had a special ability to make everyone feel content, both in her personal y professional sphere; however, the way she managed to redo her life in a foreign country, hundreds of miles away from home (family, friends, house, job, community), due to an unfortunate situación legal, simply amazed me. In just a few months, she had found a new job where she soon became a valued member and had built up a new support system.

Barcelona, Spain – Looking

When we lost a friend in his thirties due to un accidente a few years ago, the way his mother overcame this loss y the passing away of her husband just a year later was truly inspiring. She chose to be thankful for having had them in her life instead of lamenting having lost them. I believe this attitude was un factor determinante in her speedy recovery from grief.

Barcelona, Spain – Continuing
The serious disease that my husband’s cousin’s kid suffered (fortunately, he has now recovered) was also a milestone in this learning curve. The parents (who up until then seemed to me padres regulares, with their strengths y weaknesses) showed an infatigable, fierce attitude during the long stay el hospital and in making sure that their other child en casa would not suffer any major changes in her life.
Madrid, Spain – Together

I now believe that your attitude is the key. Obviamente, when such an earthquake shakes your whole world, your primera reacción is to give in to desesperación, as it is common to have ups y downs along the way. But it becomes essential to work towards a positive attitude en general.

En mi opinión, positivity is a sign of a healthy mind. And a healthy mind, the same as a healthy body, is something that needs to be constantly nurtured.

I will use the Roman saying Mens sana in corpore sano to introduce el primer método for a healthy mind: taking care of your body. Healthy eating, exercising y sleeping well are known to contribute to a healthy body, but they also contribute to a healthy mind, as body y mind (some call it soul) are nothing but two aspects of the same reality.

Barcelona, Spain – Intersecting

Secondly, I think it is vital to build a strong support system (I give my friend before credit for the expression support system). If you have truly dear familia y amigos in your life, they will be there for you in bad times. They will probably help physically (for example, if they are geographically close), but will definitely help psicológicamente, by listening, comforting, advising… However, in order to receive this kind of support in bad times, make sure to cultivate your personal relationships en los buenos tiempos.

Madrid, Spain – Fun

Finally, look for the beauty en la vida, I mean, try to find those little things that will make you happy even if it is just for a minute. That can help you escape the sorrow y pain you may be immersed in. It may be taking a walk by the sea or watching a film in your favorite genre or cooking y eating a nice meal or reading a good book (these are my choices, but las posibilidades are endless). Just make sure you pick your choice beforehand, so that you know what resource to use when you need it most.

Canary Islands, Spain – At sunrise

Age brings awareness de la realidad, thus crushing the innocence of los primeros años; however, for those who choose to reflect on the topic, it also provides a deeper comprensión of life. La vida is uncertain (random, fragile…); once this is understood y accepted, it only makes sense to live it on a daily basis and with an attitude positiva, whatever shade it acquires.

Credits

Photo 1: Seville, Spain – Mirrored – Christian Battaglia

Photo 2: Madrid, Spain – Enlightened – Tobias Messer

Photo 3: Calp, Spain – Stairway to… – Beasty

Photo 4: Valencia, Spain – Under water – Janis Skribans

Photo 5: Madrid, Spain – A couple – RadKha

Photo 6: Barcelona, Spain – La Sagrada Familia – Rishabh Varshney

Photo 7: Barcelona, Spain – Onward – Lerner Vadim

Photo 8: Barcelona, Spain – Looking – Lerner Vadim

Photo 9: Barcelona, Spain – Continuing – Lerner Vadim

Photo 10: Madrid, Spain – Together – RadKha

Photo 11: Barcelona, Spain – Intersecting – Anatasiia Tarasova

Photo 12: Madrid, Spain – Fun – goga

Photo 13: Canary Islands, Spain – At sunrise – Rott

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Russia, Britain, Portugal, Serbia, Germany, India and other parts of the world…