Transposing emblem by Maha Husaini

In Arabic uncertainty is: majhool, rayba or shak. It is the (unknown), the (sceptical) and the (doubtful). It could be any of the three and it is a word of high significance in the Middle East. With its religious, cultural and social distinctiveness, the Middle East is unique in its history, customs and traditions. It is also the land of uncertainty. The word Inshallah implies uncertainty. It means if God wills, or, in other words, nothing is certain.

Wadi Musa, Jordan – The lost city of Petra – Jamie Brown

There is always inshallah (God willing), since everything is connected to God’s will. Blessed or cursed, there is no way to escape destiny. It is a belief, a way of life, a code of conduct and a virtue. Even when all the signs imply the outcome, inshallah is omnipresent. The belief in destiny is strong and predominant, yet it does not restrain progress. People plan, work and produce, but with every move comes inshallah. When setting up an appointment, a meeting or a date, the eternal word Inshallah will surface. Uncertainty lingers and is deeply-entrenched.

Aqaba, Jordan – A the beach – Alarax

Creating a balance between nasseeb (destiny) and free will is not an issue. Some might think that we just succumb to our destiny, to what we have and simply accept our fate without questioning. But we are not submissive, as hard work is highly-regarded and we strive for the best. Free will exists but it comes with an understanding of the predetermined.

Amman, Jordan – Groceries – Elena Chevalier

When we feel that there is room for change, we venture, choose the uncertainty of change and manage to take control of our lives, with God’s will. We dare and aspire to new possibilities and unexplored dimensions. We believe that the will of God governs our lives, yet free will unconsciously persists. If things don’t happen as planned the frustration is accompanied by acceptance, since this is God’s will and it is definitely for our own benefit.

Amman, Jordan – Out the bus window – Authentic Travel

The driving force is the religious mindset. Disappointments and downfalls are accepted with hamdullah (thank God). This belief instills strength and empowers and “what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger” applies perfectly well here, and on every occasion, hamdullah (thank God) looms. This is the magical boost that instigates perseverance and respects patience and forbearance. Failures and setbacks are received with “hopefully for the best.” Acceptance is a virtue.

Amman, Jordan – Roadscape – Authentic Travel

Life is not all rosy and perfect. There might be failures, disappointments and resignation to the predetermined, such as failed marriages. In a culture that is particularly conscious of fadiha (scandal), divorce could be out of the question. Many women suffer and simply surrender to their fate because patience is the righteous thing and divorce is a scandal. There is also the fear of economic repercussions. Dependant women have no source of income and might continue suffering due to a dread of the unknown. There are various situations where people might endure harsh conditions and accept them as nasseeb, or their destiny. Torn between stability and uncertainty many would choose the real, the stable and the safe.

Aqaba City, Jordan – Looking out – TarasikJO

And mind you, we are a society that hates change. We are always pulled to the past. The forces of tradition and heritage prevail and dominate. When challenged by uncertainty we are haunted by fear. The fear of social pressure, the unknown and the consequences. New ideas and concepts are not easily accepted, even worse, new endeavors are deplored and condemned. Our fear of chaos prompts us to reject and resent novel ideas. Yet, if change brings benefit, we embrace it. Absurd? It might be, but people tend to applaud success and loathe failures.

Amman, Jordan – Dining – Photocritical

We are also the land of contradictions. The ideas of fate and destiny are spread across a wide spectrum of society. Even the educated fully accept concepts that are bequeathed to us by our ancestors. These concepts move people’s lives and their understanding. Some of us still stick to them, others crave change. Nevertheless, we are confronted with the relentless force of progress which comes in different forms and shapes. It might be sudden and radical or can infiltrate smoothly bringing new thoughts and revolutionary approaches. We will eventually be dragged into uncertainties which will open unknown horizons. Hopefully, favorable ones.

Madaba, Jordan – Out for a ride – Dmitriy Feldman Svarshik

We are not different from any other culture. We share with others the fear of the unknown. We realize that uncertainty comes with a margin of error. However, we try, experiment and give ourselves a chance. It is a human trait that each and every one of us wishes to leave their mark, walk their own path and attain their own goal. If we deeply reflect on the daunting aspects of uncertainty, we would hold back. But we don’t. We might be hesitant and indecisive, yet we are not overwhelmed by the immensity of the decision and its outcomes. On the contrary, hope and determination urge us to delve into the unknown and to explore new prospects. There is a mysterious force within us that pushes us forward. Our anxiety vanishes and is replaced by enthusiasm as soon as we start treading on safe ground.

Petra, Jordan – Hello – Roxanne Desgagnes

As humans, we have a common belief that uncertainties are linked to a mysterious notion. We call it God’s will, others call it a super power or a stroke of luck. Different names for the same concept. We could be hindered, delayed or defeated but there is always a fervent belief that God or luck will always be on our side.

Maha Husaini

Credits

Photo 1: Petra, Jordan – Urn Tomb – PNP Images (Shutterstock)

Photo 2: Wadi Musa, Jordan – The lost city of Petra – Jamie Brown (Unsplash)_1

Photo 3: Aqaba, Jordan – A the beach – Alarax (Shutterstock)

Photo 4: Amman, Jordan – Groceries – Elena Chevalier (Shutterstock)

Photo 5: Amman, Jordan – Out the bus window – Authentic Travel (Shutterstock)

Photo 6: Amman, Jordan – Roadscape – Authentic Travel (Shutterstock)

Photo 7: Aqaba City, Jordan – Looking out – TarasikJO (Shutterstock)

Photo 8: Amman, Jordan – Dining – Photocritical (Shutterstock)

Photo 9: Madaba, Jordan – Out for a ride – Dmitriy Feldman Svarshik (Shutterstock)

Photo 10: Petra, Jordan – Hello – Roxanne Desgagnes (Unsplash)

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Alencar, Joana. Uncertainty – Our Spirit – Brazil. November 2018.

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Kingsley, Anastasia. Expect the Unexpected. November 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Marti, Sol. A Thought Falling – Spain and Germany. December 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Ray, Sanjay Kumar. Once upon a Time in a Queue – India. November 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sariñana, Alejandra González. A Brighter Future? – Mexico. December 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sevunts, Nane. From Uncertainty to Newness. November 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Bosnia, Armenia and then on to the Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Alejandra González Sariñana

“Más vale malo conocido que bueno por conocer” (a known evil is better than an unknown good) is a common phrase in Mexico, and it tells a lot about the way we think as a collective. We do not like change, we do not like uncertainty. For example, it is used when you hire someone who is not perfect for a job, but at least she is honest. Or someone who is always late with delivery, but at least she is good. People would rather deal with mediocre than take the chance of getting something worse. This state of mind also translates into personal decisions and relationships: many will stay with someone in a not-so-great relationship instead of facing the uncertainty of being single (because, at least he/she doesn’t cheat). The same can be said for our political decisions. For years we have maintained corrupt governors and parties because it is always better to be sure of something bad then to be uncertain of something good.

Casas Grandes Municipality, Mexico – Portrait – Daniel Apodaca

Only three parties have occupied the presidency in México’s modern history. The first one stayed in power for over seventy years. Everybody knew about the corruption and the rigged elections but, still, most voters elected them over and over again for fear of losing whatever few benefits they had. In 2000 the country voted for Vicente Fox, the first president that did not belong to the official party. Change and hope where in the air, we thought things would be radically different, better. Long story short, corruption did not go away, it only got a brand-new face. We were left with more violence and insecurity than ever, and a war on drugs that has left thousands dead or missing. In the end, Fox’s party only managed to stay in power for two periods. Just twelve years later, the country voted the old party back into power. The familiar corruption and politics seemed to be better than the promised change. Now, we are again faced with the uncertainty of a new way of governing the country.

Mexico City, Mexico – Hot – Marisol Rios Campuzano

On July 2, 2018 the opposition candidate, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, won the presidency with an overwhelming majority. He was sworn in on December 1, and Mexico heads into unknown territory; but it seems that, finally, nothing could be worse than the known evil. Years of corrupt governments have left us with thousands of victims, millions of pesos missing from public funds, unsolved cases and acquitted criminals. Now, Mexico is finally ready to take a chance on a new government, one that was eighteen years in the making. Over time, Lopez Obrador transformed himself into a messianic figure, promising one last hope for transformation, preaching that an honest president is enough to put an end to corruption (and pretty much fix every other problem). Three times he was a presidential candidate, twice the uncertainty that he represents lost. Fear of change and rumors that the economy would collapse, and we would (literally) suffer the same fate as Venezuela were enough to keep him out of the presidency. Until now.

Orizaba, Mexico – A puff – Eduardo Kowska

Still, there are those who remain skeptical. There is doubt about just how much can really be accomplished, and fear of setbacks in what little progress has been made in some areas. Part of the campaign against him was calling him “un peligro para México” (dangerous for Mexico), referring to the radical changes he proposed. The main problem he is faced with as he assumes power, is insecurity. Drug cartels are worse than ever, everyday there is news of bodies being found everywhere: illegal burial sites with hundreds of corpses, trailers full of unclaimed deceased that nobody knows what to do with, morgues and forensic teams are insufficient. Crime in the cities and on the roads has also risen: robberies, kidnappings, assaults and car thefts happen every day. As a society, we seem to have become more violent toward one another. Many people elected Obrador hoping that he can make it safe to travel the country or, simply, to go out at night again. He claims that he can reduce crime radically by being honest and fighting corruption, which is, probably, the most deeply rooted problem in Mexico.

Puerto Vallarta, Mexico – In centro – Bentfotos

Whether he will be able to reduce corruption is uncertain, and there are some early signs that it might not be as easy as he claims. There is hope, but there is also fear, because he has been surrounding himself with well-known politicians from the old official party, people that have been linked to corrupt practices and abuse of power. When asked about it, he answered that he has forgiven the past and that those people have been redeemed by joining his movement. Obrador himself has raised questions about how he funded eighteen years of campaigning all over the country. He also started his political career in the official party (PRI), and later became a member of the opposition (PRD). He founded his own party when the PRD refused to back him for a third time in his run for the presidency. Now he has absolute power in his party, with his own rules. He came to power as the unchallenged candidate and he has been accused of making all the decisions by himself. Some analysts have compared him to Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez as a dictator in the making, which is in no way reassuring.

San Miguel de Allende, Mexico – Waiting – Jezael Melgoza

A dictatorship is not the only threat that Obrador poses, both national and international economic analysts and business owners are nervous about his plans regarding major reforms that where approved by the present administration. One of the major reforms was in education, with the main goal being to evaluate teachers and unify content across the country. As soon as Obrador won the election, he said he would reverse that reform and stop teacher examinations. For now, the future of education in Mexico is uncertain, as there is no new plan to replace the one he is going to reject. This might be one of the main concerns internally, but internationally the main concern is that Obrador threatens to invalidate the reforms made in the energy sector. After many decades, the oil and gas industry in Mexico was opened to private investors, both national and international. Contracts and promises have been made, investments have already started, but nobody is sure if things are going to change. It is hard to be sure about anything because Obrador seems to change his mind often, going back and forth on many issues. Campaign promises have been broken even before he has taken office, and his main goals now seem unclear.

Santiago de Querétaro, Mexico – A break – Bernardo Ramonfaur

We are now facing uncertain times, with an uncertain leader. There are questions about just how much he can change in six years. There are rumors of him making deals with the current ruling party. Many people see him as the last hope of returning peace and security to the country; others see him as a threat to the status quo. The truth is that Mexico lives in a very complex, violent and ancient social inequity which will not be easy to overcome. But who knows? Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador might just be the unknown good we have been hoping for.

Alejandra González Sariñana

Credits

Photo 1: Garcia, Mexico – Silhouette – Eduardo Balderas (Unsplash)

Photo 2: Casas Grandes Municipality, Mexico – Portrait – Daniel Apodaca (Unsplash)

Photo 3: Mexico City, Mexico – Hot – Marisol Rios Campuzano (Shutterstock)

Photo 4: Orizaba, Mexico – A puff – Eduardo Kowska (Unsplash)

Photo 5: Puerto Vallarta, Mexico – In centro – Bentfotos (Shutterstock)

Photo 6: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico – Waiting – Jezael Melgoza (Unsplash)

Photo 7: Santiago de Querétaro, Mexico – A break – Bernardo Ramonfaur (Unsplash)

Photos from private contributions, unsplash, Shutterstock and Bigstock

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Alencar, Joana. Uncertainty – Our Spirit – Brazil. November 2018.

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Kingsley, Anastasia. Expect the Unexpected. November 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Marti, Sol. A Thought Falling – Spain and Germany. December 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Ray, Sanjay Kumar. Once upon a Time in a Queue – India. November 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sevunts, Nane. From Uncertainty to Newness. November 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Jordan, Bosnia, Armenia and then on to the Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Blanca Domínguez Cobreros

A hand holds a pencil before a blank paper. About to start the trace of a drawing, it ponders the move and remains still. It doesn’t know where to go in the immense whiteness. Uncertain of the right path, it petrifies. Its músculos grow tenser and tenser, the skin sweaty and cold. It remembers vaguely la existencia of a space of soft and edgy líneas, of free shapes and contours. The hand looks around and perceives only surfaces, but it isn’t able to find the lines, the traces to follow. It cannot pick up one thing; it cannot distinguish a form anymore. Everything becomes one continuous, indistinct substance.

Tenerife, Spain – Drawing light at night – Alexilena

The hand faints.

My eyelids open and close softly, as I look at the face in front of me. Two eyes look back at me while talking, and I manage to tune my brain to a lower speed to observe closely.

El acto of looking becomes very detailed; I start to notice the forms of the eyes I have in front. I see the fleshy contour moving, demarcated by a forest of eyelashes. I see two brown, watery fruits with piercing black holes pointing at me. I try to focus on them, but mi atención jumps to the next spot until I get lost in the wrinkly valley between the cheeks and the eyes. Thoughts sprout from the landscape I am contemplating, and I can hear them clearly: they talk en español. I pay attention to them and realize that they do not belong to the person; they come from my own mind.

Berlin, Germany – Schwarz, rot, gold – Artem Gavrysh

If this means what I just said, when I look at la persona, what I see is the backstage of my mind: ¡I am looking at my judgment! While this suspicion assaults me, the skin of the person starts to feel a little blurred. I hadn’t noticed that there is a second layer, almost perfectly adjusted to the face, but a few millimeters away from the first one. It’s like un holograma, but with a fine, fleshy quality. In a forth and back movimiento, I realize I am having both an image of the person and that of my own thinking in front of my eyes. I want to play with this new magic power of mine, but the more I look, the more layers come out, and I understand I have no control over it. Deviating from my subject, I gaze around to find out, horrified, that every object is now un holograma: their shapes, slightly distorted, vibrate like a humming sound. Meanwhile, la persona accumulates more and more of this coating, emerging from every new perception, fantasía, thought, memoria, … ¡Basta!

Berlin, Germany – Part transparent – Michael

I breathe.

I know there is a quiet place somewhere behind, almost at reach. Following the glimmer of an image pacífica y constante, I focus with some effort and keep on looking. The noisy layers get thinner and thinner… I see them fade.

Two serene eyes look back at me, and “me” dissolves like salt in water, and I become the look of the eyes. In this looking, I can feel more than I can see. I feel no fear.

Cadiz, Spain – Water flowing – Huaidan Photography

The look wraps me like a nest of warm hands, and we drift down the flow of a river silencioso.

I let myself go… I wonder where, though. There is something rather disquieting about “knowing” when taken as the conqueror of a totality: you will never get there. The more you know, the more aware you are of how much you don’t know. Knowledge is an island, one astronomer said.1

I move slowly down the river and flow into a pool of water. Knowledge is an island, and I sail in a sea of ignorancia. If such an island exists, it should be easy to see it on this immense plate. I get concerned I will never find it. Or that it might not exist at all – although, if this water is ignorancia, the unknown, there must be a known somewhere… This dialectical game keeps me busy for hours, maybe days, until I realize that I am sailing on the same spot. ¿What if knowledge is el movimiento?

Spain – The Beehive – Munimara

A big void opens in the water.

I find myself alone in free fall, my mind full of possible endings. I fall and fall, and I open my arms with unexpected joy. In the fall, dancing with the mystery becomes natural: the counterpart of uncertainty is la libertad.

Stuttgart, Germany – Stadtbibliothek – Max Langelott

« ¡Unlearn everything and embrace madness!», urges Rumi in un poema.2 I guess madness is the closest we can get to our percepción innate, like the child in awe about the world, the eyes free from the skin of common sense.

¡Embrace madness! The words resonating in the void. I fall. I fall. I fall in the clarity of madness. I am the flow of the hand, pouring as a current of lines on the blank paper. Living in the things, I see now, there is no need to explain to myself who I am: I am being. And this is, certainly, all I need to be.

Blanca Domínguez Cobreros

Works cited:

1 Gleiser, M. The Island of Knowledge: The Limits of Science and the Search for Meaning.

2 Rumi. “Your mind can fly to great heights (M II, 2326-2332)”. Rumi’s Little Book of Life.

Credits

Photo 1: Hamburg, Germany – The black escalator – Wellington Rodrigues

Photo 2: Tenerife, Spain – Drawing light at night – Alexilena

Photo 3: Berlin, Germany – Schwarz, rot, gold – Artem Gavrysh

Photo 4: Berlin, Germany – Part transparent – Michael

Photo 5: Cadiz, Spain – Water flowing – Huaidan Photography

Photo 6: Spain – The Beehive – Munimara

Photo 7: Stuttgart, Germany – Stadtbibliothek – Max Langelott

Photos from private contributions, unsplash and shutterstock

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Alencar, Joana. Uncertainty – Our Spirit – Brazil. November 2018.

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Kingsley, Anastasia. Expect the Unexpected. November 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Ray, Sanjay Kumar. Once upon a Time in a Queue – India. November 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sevunts, Nane. From Uncertainty to Newness. November 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Jordan, Mexico, Bosnia, and then on to the Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Joana Alencar

Brazil is by far the most populous country in Latin America and the largest one in the southern hemisphere, only slightly smaller than the United States.

We have the world´s largest rain forest, the largest tropical wetlands, the largest waterfall system and the greatest biodiversity as well.

And, above all, we have the 8th largest economy in the world, yet occupy a shameful 75th place in the Human Development Index.

Since 2001 Brazil has been struggling to successfully be one of the world’s strongest emerging countries.

Gonzaga, Brazil – Praca Independencia

Nonetheless, we faced the worst recession in our history in 2013, and one year after it, we had over 14 million unemployed citizens. If you compare it to the American recession in 2008-2010, when the United States lost about 8 million jobs, you can gauge the magnitude of our crisis.

15 million citizens live in extreme poverty, and 62% of Brazilian families are in debt. Besides that, Brazilian public services are broke. Which is a tragedy in a country where there is a 34% tax rate, and people rely on public services in return.

In 2016, 4 to 8 million protested against corruption, in a march which numbers show to be the largest in our history.

Brazil – Through the cone

Even though we are very slowly emerging from the economic crisis, most people can´t see much improvement.

Since it all began with astonishing and ongoing political corruption scandals, we are still immersed in random disappointment that messes with our minds.

The combination of the economic crisis and this strong feeling of disappointment lead us to this moment of distrust and uncertainty.

Lenzi, Brazil – Looking

These confusing times have made me think about the difference between risk and uncertainty.

In risk we acknowledge some future possibilities.

We are not sure of the probabilities, but we may expect changes by choosing one future to trust.

In uncertainty we are not aware of any future possibilities.

We can´t predict the future and we can´t expect changes. We don´t even identify which option we might have.

There´s no trust. Just doubt. We simply don´t know.

Sadly, that is our case.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – Fire in Museum of Brazil

At this historical moment of fuzzy uncertainty, the National Museum of Brazil, in Rio de Janeiro, was engulfed by flames, and burned to ashes on September 2, 2018.

This tragedy happened on its 200th anniversary, on the same day and in the same place where Brazil’s independence was proclaimed.

In those buildings, not only did a woman announce Brazil’s independence, but our first constitution protecting individual rights was written. It was also the location where our first National Constituent Assembly took place.

It was built to become the most important museum in Latin America, with more than 20 million artefacts. Among its collection there were some artefacts more than 160 million years old. The Luzia woman, the oldest human fossil ever found on the American continent, was about 12,000 years old.

Despite all that, we forgot to celebrate the museum and our history. We didn´t study our gains; we didn´t notice the scientific discoveries, the art collection or the historical documents.

We didn´t care.

That was supposed to be the government´s responsibility, and now 90% of the collection is gone. Consumed by fire.

Porto Alegre, Brazil – Uncertain

The loss of a great national museum is a global tragedy. A tragedy that for us, Brazilians, is a symbol of our lack of vision.

This fire is a symbol of our newly gained disregard for information and skills acquired through experience or education over the years.

The result is the burden of uncertainty.

Brazilians are in grief, but there are still no signs of change.

We are stuck in a time of uncertainty, hoping that anger doesn´t take over the country.

It already seemed like too much to handle but, suddenly, it wasn´t enough.

Maua da Serra, Brazil – Get out of there

The country´s most popular politician, a former far-left president, is already in jail for corruption and money laundering and couldn’t run again in the elections we just had.

The far-right presidential candidate who won, was stabbed in the stomach during a campaign rally.

Now the polarized environment may be exacerbated even more.

It is painful and our democracy is being tested. It must prove its gains against corruption among all the losses in the battles.

Now here we are.

Controlled by an emotional mindset that keeps us confused during the economic, political and moral crisis that we face.

Altamira, Brazil – Open

I wonder if human psychology will drive the country.

It does look like we don´t know how to behave to achieve that progressive mindset we once had.

We are not able to recognize ourselves anymore, since we are slowly becoming unfamiliar with our nation´s history and identity.

Maybe, our so-called lust for life has distracted us.

Curitiba, Brazil – Lust for life

We deny our own identity as if we could choose to be someone else, as if we could be anyone but ourselves, as if we could run away and emigrate. Nowadays, 62% of our youth wishes to emigrate. But what does this failure of vision tell us?

If we don´t know our history, we don´t know what we are made of.

If we don´t know what we are made of, we don´t know who we are.

If we don´t know who we are, we don´t know who to become.

We must overcome this ignorance to vanquish uncertainty.

Itacare, Brazil – Hungry

Nelson Rodrigues, a famous Brazilian writer once complained:

“Brazilians are like an inverted Narciso who spits upon his own image, there´s the truth, we don´t find personal or historical excuses for self-esteem.”

But the truth is, we have not even looked for those reasons for quite a long time.

We have no other choice than to work to rebuild our lives and our nation, despite this mindset of despair that drives us to anger and blinds us completely.

We may have collapsed in confidence, but we are still the 4th largest democracy on the planet, and 97% of our children are in school, so we could try to remember our past and learn from our history to create a better present and work towards a better future.

Brasilia, Brazil – Hot air

It is up to us to renounce this collapse in trust.

Enough with uncertainty.

But we are not there yet.

For now, I´ll quote a song by Gilberto Gil that exemplifies the current spirit.

“(…) Nothing but a wooden board floating upon the waters, with no destination.”

Joana Alencar

Credits

Photo 1: Brasilia, Brazil – Another world – William Carletti

Photo 2: Gonzaga, Brazil – Praca Independencia – Gabriel Ramos

Photo 3: Brazil – Through the cone – Davidson Luna

Photo 4: Lenzi, Brazil – Looking – Lucas Lenzi

Photo 5: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – Fire in Museum of Brazil – CP DC Press

Photo 6: Porto Alegre, Brazil – Uncertain – Lucas Affonso Santos

Photo 7: Maua da Serra, Brazil – Get out of there – Guilherme Stecanella

Photo 8: Altamira, Brazil – Open – Dennys Lennon

Photo 9: Curitiba, Brazil – Lust for life – Vinicius Wiesehofer

Photo 10: Itacare, Brazil – Hungry – Milo Miloezger

Photo 11: Brasilia, Brazil – Hot air – Alexandre Perotto

Photos from private contributions, unsplash and shutterstock

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Kingsley, Anastasia. Expect the Unexpected. November 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Ray, Sanjay Kumar. Once upon a Time in a Queue – India. November 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sevunts, Nane. From Uncertainty to Newness. November 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Jordan, Mexico, Germany/Spain, Bosnia, and then on to the Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Nane Sevunts

Once upon a time there was an Armenian king. He had a beautiful daughter and he wanted to give her in marriage. A lot of princes wanted to be her husband but she said she would marry the one who would grow flowers from the seeds she gave them. The princes took the seeds and went away. After a year they came to the palace with beautiful flowers. Only one guy brought a flowerpot without any plants. The princess approached him and said “You are my chosen one. I have given thoroughly boiled seeds that could not give life to a flower.”

The Legend of the Honest Prince
Yerevan, Armenia – The Blue Mosque
* * * *

We all make choices. Choices that affect our lives but we make those choices when we are ready for them…

It seems life goes smoothly. I am here in Yerevan, the capital of ancient Armenia. I feel the lightness in the air and trees and the grass seems the greenest. The people are smiling and there is hope in their eyes. Hope for goodness… Hope that newness will come…

People are hopeful for the better but the space is full of anoroshutiun (uncertainty). After the political turmoil in the country we are waiting… We are waiting for the good to win… We are waiting for the evil to vanish….

Yerevan, Armenia – Revolution

Have you seen the start of a storm when the angry waves move in the middle of the sea and come and crash on heavy rocks? Waves that want to transform… Waves that will destroy anything on their way… That want to get out…

We were like that… The wave of revolution was like a storm in the ocean. Unprecedented energy that burst out. Years of lies, years of corruption and hatred accumulated in one single balloon that exploded because there was no more space for hatred. The waves cleaned out the lie, and a space for newness was created.

Yerevan, Armenia – Demonstrators blocking streets

The sea calmed down. The waves relaxed and a phase of waiting started… We are waiting for the Newness to take shape. The energy of calmer waves is softer and we don’t see the results yet. And this makes us wonder. Are we going to build the country after creating the space?

Right now, we are in uncertainty. Everything, starting from employers, businesses and investors, is taking shape. We don’t know whether the new forces will be able to hold up against the Old. We don’t know whether we will manage to be firm in our beliefs and in our identity.

Everything, starting from voting to fair business, is in the air. It all needs a test.

Yerevan, Armenia – Fountain play

We have a lot to be concerned about. We are concerned about the voter that sells votes for a candy bar. We are concerned about a shopkeeper who does not want to give change. We are concerned about the OLD GUY, the guy that is used to making money on the side.

The corruption is heavily rooted in the Soviet era. We need a shift in our way of thinking. Will it happen to a fifty-year-old guy who does not see the problem of selling an official document? Will it happen to the traffic policeman who believes that taking money for a driving infraction is the right thing to do. Will it happen to the woman who believes that selling votes is okay?

Yerevan, Armenia – Arguing

We are going through a transition from old relations to something that has no name. I am afraid for the people in the country who will be astonished.

We need new institutions, a fair judiciary, tax relief, pro-business policies, pro-investment legislation.

The wave of revolution has been sweeping, sweeping away everything that was old. It has been sweeping away old relations, the old mentality, and given me the right to dream, to dream of a country that…

Has no people below the poverty line
Has an outstanding education system
Has a strong army that no enemy can defeat
Has a healthy economy where people invest and harvest ripe fruits
Has fair taxation
Old age with dignity
Happy youth
Prosperous business
And fair governors.

Yerevan, Armenia – At Republic square

I dream of this country and know that it will become a reality one day. I dream of the day when I will feel good about being a citizen of Armenia. I dream of relations where there is no cheating and hatred, where people live side by side and are good to each other.

I know that we have a long way to go… I know that there are internal and external forces that have their interests. I am aware of that. But I also know that I am a representative of a nation that has survived a lot of troublesome times. A nation that has been killed and repressed. A nation that nonetheless had the courage to go down a new path.

Yerevan, Armenia – Unidentified

We will overcome the phase of uncertainty and will build the New World. A world where people work and share and prosper. A world where honesty is the highest virtue. A world where there is a place for compassion and love.

We have a long way to go until we get the country of our dreams. If you don’t achieve your goals, it means you still have a ways to go. It will not be easy… But it will eventually happen…

Nane Sevunts

Credits

Photo 1: Yerevan, Armenia – Twins – Viktoria Prusakova

Photo 2: Yerevan, Armenia – The Blue Mosque – Alexandr Hovhannisyan

Photo 3: Yerevan, Armenia – Revolution – Davit Ayvazyan

Photo 4: Yerevan, Armenia – Demonstrators blocking streets – Artem Avetisyan

Photo 5: Yerevan, Armenia – Fountain play – E Diego

Photo 6: Yerevan, Armenia – Arguing – Alexander Chizhenok

Photo 7: Yerevan, Armenia – At Republic square – Dinozzzaver

Photo 8: Yerevan, Armenia – Unidentified – Ruslan Harutyunov

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Kingsley, Anastasia. Expect the Unexpected. November 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Ray, Sanjay Kumar. Once upon a Time in a Queue – India. November 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Brazil, Jordan, Mexico, Germany/Spain, Bosnia, and then on to the Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Sanjay Kumar Ray

In a televised address to the nation on November 8, 2016, India’s Prime Minister took the nation by surprise and announced the demonetization of the 1000 and 500 rupee notes in a major assault on black money, fake currency and corruption. The country needed several months to come to terms with the after-effects. Raju, the local street vendor had some Rs 500 notes that he had saved for the marriage of his daughter in distant Rajasthan. For the next few days his daily work started with standing in the bank queue to exchange demonetized notes before the deadline. Although this measure was taken with the good intention of curbing illegal money, it created uncertainty in the minds of the people from day one. The deadlines for exchanging notes were often changed or advanced, and new objectives like bringing more people into the banking system and turning India into a cashless economy were added to it. It took several days for Raju to get his notes exchanged.

Haridwar, India – Crossing

Beforehand, he got a unique identification card, called Aadhar (a 12-digit number that can be obtained by residents of India, based on their biometric and demographic data). It is no simple job to issue a billion people identity cards containing biometric data. Often, news broke out about the safety of citizen’s biometric data collected in this way, although Raju still does not fully comprehend what it means to have one’s own personal data compromised. And there is still controversy as to whether and how much of it will be used for identity purposes.

Jaipur, India – Connected

Although India has made tremendous progress in digital technology, many of its citizens are still illiterate, many do not have a place to keep the card, cannot read what is written there or do not know how to use it. Raju, being literate himself, has never used a computer. This card helped him prove his identity in a foreign city for the first time and receive government subsidies.

Vrindavan, India – Approaching

In the queue, Raju became friends with a 70-year-old pensioner named Mr. Sharma, who was there to exchange the Rs 1000 note he had saved for emergencies. Mr. Sharma can be called a member of the upwardly mobile middle class in the country. Although he has a laptop at home, Mr. Sharma is more at ease visiting the bank branch, but this visit had changed quite a bit with the long queues every day. The computer is not his cup of tea; while he cannot get used to holding a computer mouse in his hand, our Raju can hold a real mouse in his hand, but has never put his hands on a computer one. All these people are affected because they have no other way to exchange money after the demonetization drive started. They need real cash to pay the bills. And standing in a queue is the only way to beat uncertainty.

Hyderabad, India – In line

Technically, Raju’s income puts him below the poverty line (defined as earning $1.90 per day1) and is a card holder. Hence, it was indeed a matter of joy for him when the bank manager one day asked Raju to stand in another queue in order to open a bank account. The Indian government’s ambitious financial inclusion scheme called Jan Dhan Yojana brought 310 million Indians into the formal banking system by March 2018. According to the World Bank, the country still has 190 million adults without a bank account.2 Raju has to keep track of his new bank status now so that unscrupulous people do not misuse his account. During the demonetization drive there was news that some influential people were using the bank accounts of poor people to stash black money. His was a no-frills account, initially with a zero balance facility. Very soon, banks, overburdened with huge NPAs (Non-Performing Assets) accumulated due to large home development loan defaulters, started to penalize people for not maintaining a minimum balance in their accounts. After a huge outcry, banks were forced to reduce the penalty for not keeping the minimum balance. Some of the big names who defaulted were business tycoons, famous for organizing extravagant shows and appearing on page 3 of the newspapers and tabloids. Raju wonders: did these people ever stand in a queue! As for Raju, he does not mind standing in that queue to become included in the financial mainstream of the country. Why should he bother? He is already used to getting up very early in the morning with his fellow cohabitants in the cluster where he resides, to reach the very first queue of the day – to fetch water from the municipal outlets or water tanker, since the bore wells often refuse to discharge any water during the summer months. As a disciplined citizen, Raju bravely faces the uncertainties of falling levels in the water reservoirs and the disintegration of the environment around him due to the accumulation of waste and garbage. Only god is saving this country from disaster – Raju believes, and happily goes to stand in another queue.

New Delhi, India – Pumping water

Raju knows his friend Mr. Sharma was not without worries either. Consistently falling interest rates eat up pensioners own savings and more and more Mr. Sharmas receive less and less money from the bank.

As financial uncertainty had been reigning in the country for quite some time, news came from India’s unquiet borders, raising doubts about sustained peace among neighbors. Due to 24 hours of TV beaming into homes and offices, the news from the borders reaches people very fast, and nobody is sure what is happening on the border or why. India fought four wars with Pakistan, hundreds of soldiers died on both sides of the border. And in between these conflicts, India has been fighting proxy wars in the northern state of Kashmir. Soldiers in the regular army, paramilitary forces and local police are engaged in fierce battles to thwart attempts by terrorists and infiltrators in Kashmir. If long-standing disputes among nations in Europe and Asia can be mutually and peacefully settled, if two Vietnams and two Germanys can unite and ensure peace, then why can’t we have peace on our borders, Raju asks his friend Mr. Sharma. 70 years have passed since India gained independence from British rule. The present generation of political leaders was born after independence. The question is, when will somebody come out and say enough is enough; let peace be given a chance. It seems on a few occasions, both countries were almost on the point of reaching an agreement, but due to some reasons better known to politicians, the peace remained as elusive as ever – Mr. Sharma explains.

Jaipur, India – Possible

One queue Raju dreads is when one of his children falls ill and needs to visit the local government hospitals. The health care system in the country is mostly managed by the private sector. While medical tourism is booming in the country, the government hospitals are overburdened and doctors are overworked; patients wait in the thousands for an appointment or test. Remember, patients like Mr. Sharma are among those who can go to the capitals of the country and states for specialized treatment, but millions in the hinterland are at the mercy of the vagaries of uncertainty. Mr. Sharma has explained to Raju that we have to bear the fallout of development and higher GDP, while the glaciers are melting, rivers are drying up and getting polluted, the water level is going down, the increasing use of fossil fuels adds to the pollution, cities get choked, and people often become ill. The country is precariously dependent on the import of crude oil from countries in the conflict zones, and the country’s competition with the behemoth China is taking its toll in its search for a distinct Indian path of development.

Varanasi, India – To the river

Raju is better off economically now and no longer wishes to go back to his village, but is very concerned about the uncertain future of his children. At the moment, however, there is something else he needs to ensure. And so…

He rushes off to stand in the next queue.

Sanjay Kumar Ray

Notes

1. “Below the Poverty Line – India.” Wikipedia. Access: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Below_Poverty_Line_(India)

2. “19 crore Indian adults don’t have bank account: World Bank.” The Times of India. Access: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/business/india-business/19-crore-indian-adults-dont-have-bank-account-world-bank/articleshow/63833962.cms

Credits

Photo 1: New Delhi, India – In the alley – Palash Jain

Photo 2: Haridwar, India – Crossing – Swapnll Dwivedi

Photo 3: Jaipur, India – Connected – Annie Spratt

Photo 4: Vrindavan, India – Approaching – Fancycrave

Photo 5: Hyderabad, India – In line – Reddees

Photo 6: New Delhi, India – Pumping water – Patrick Beznoska

Photo 7: Jaipur, India – Possible – Annie Spratt

Photo 8: Varanasi, India – To the river – Thomas Young

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Kingsley, Anastasia. Expect the Unexpected. November 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Armenia, Brazil, Jordan, Mexico, Germany/Spain, Bosnia, and then on to the Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Anastasia Kingsley
Here in Croatia, it is not wise to take things for granted.
“Bit će ako bude” – “It will be if it is [meant to be],”
“ako bog da” – “if God wills it.”
New York, America – Checking

In my native America, where I was born of European immigrants from (surprise) Croatia, people aren’t so passive. We take charge of life, as you know. To grab the brass ring, one must study, learn, network and (let’s face it) brown-nose. Most college graduates in the US expect to achieve the majority of their goals. Perhaps they won’t be CEOs or millionaires, but they do expect to reach a pinnacle of success demonstrated by nice automobiles, an attractive spouse and children, trophies like swanky vacations at least here and there, and a slice of the American apple pie. Why not go for the American dream? I can do it too!

Zagreb, Croatia – The steps

After living in Croatia for nearly 20 years, it simply isn’t so here. Imagine a dog that has been beaten too many times. Instead of anticipating a warm pat on the head, he is already cringing and preparing for the baton.

Young children are very well educated, learning English in nursery school with their parents’ hopes of beating the odds and experiencing some kind of economic security that will bring them peace of mind. More often than not, that would be a government job. Until very recently, many people had only one job all their lives. Get hired at 20 and retire at 60, particularly if you are lucky (or well-connected enough) to land a government job (at city hall, the police department or post office, etc.), but even that is no guarantee anymore.

Opatija, Croatia – Ready

Americans know something a little different – get a job and then, get a side hustle. Maybe then, and only then, will you live the good life, and not be at the mercy of one’s employer who may, on a whim, decide to let you go. Croatians have always moonlighted, but they think some options like working online seem a little bit unbelievable. In the past Yugoslavia, factory jobs were generally from 6 am to 2 pm, then family lunch time, a nap, and, at the end of the day, watch the evening news – and – Laku Noć (good night)! The pay wasn’t anything spectacular, probably half of what people now earn. The monetary unit was the Dinar, the standard was low, and leaving the country was out of the question, as was going on any type of holiday (except maybe to the seaside, particularly if you have a relative in Dalmatia).

Dubrovnik, Croatia – At the seaside

During the days of communism, families, like kittens, clumped together. Three generations in the same apartment (stan) was not unusual. Nowadays, grandma or grandpa are on one floor of the house, and the kids (with their spouse and offspring) live very close by, often on another floor, but there is some privacy, thank goodness. And the relationships have changed too. Back then, the man might occasionally cheat on his wife or beat her, but families stuck together. Nowadays, divorce isn’t on every corner, but it is certainly on every street.

Dubrovnik, Croatia – Painting the town red

To many people now, those were the good old days because two or three household members were employed, plus maybe a pensioner, so – although funds were tight – families were closely knit and no one starved. It does sound better in some ways than what we have today – four people at the table, each with his or her own electronic device – but it wasn’t paradise.

Atlanta, America – From Jackson Street Bridge

Another huge cultural difference is the idea that getting your paycheck in Croatia will happen, sooner or later, so just be patient and wait. And don’t complain, or else you might get fired and then you really won’t get anything. Logical? In the US, perhaps due to slavery, getting paid is an inalienable right. Even companies on the verge of bankruptcy will “of course” pay their employees. In Croatia, you can’t expect that. It all depends. Those who work in a hotel by the sea may wait for months until the summer season begins before receiving their pay from the following winter and spring. Maybe they will get half of their salary. Hopefully.

Vis, Croatia – The island

How do these people survive? They have a reserve fund – yes, savings. Even the poorest widow knows how to put money aside for her grandchild’s graduation present. Second, nearly every Croat I know has access to a small plot of land to plant seasonal vegetables. What isn’t eaten is frozen, and fruit trees are for canning and making homemade jams (marmalada) to spread on the crepes (palačhinka). Lunch is large, delicious and filling; soup or salad and a main dish, with dry bread for dipping the last droplet of sauce on the plate. However, dinners here are very modest; typically yogurt, or a plate of steamed potatoes and Swiss chard (blitva) seasoned with salt and pepper, garlic and homemade olive oil. (YUM!)

Rovinj, Croatia – Eternal

Third, they have faith in God. If they could survive Yugoslavia, the war, and now, the EU, they can certainly find a way to survive this. That is, if God wills it. The Croatian religion is predominantly Catholic, in a Mediterranean kind of way. I.e., young couples sleep together before marriage in the parents’ home if he or she is a good boy or girl. They definitely go to church as a type of insurance policy so that if worse comes to worse, they will be protected from evil. As a result, God keeps a scorecard of 90% mass attendance and rewards those who sacrifice Sunday mornings in church by giving them job security, healthy children and only mild illnesses during the cold and flu season. However, the younger generation is questioning this system, as well as the existence of God.

Zagreb, Croatia – Shadowed circle

In general, however, there is a type of helplessness that no one wants to talk about: Where are the jobs? What will the future hold? Does entrepreneurialism stand a chance? Will western apathy and immorality pollute the clear water of safety, fresh food and overall goodness that still exists here, on a yet underdeveloped level? We do not know the answers. But one thing can be expected: the unexpected.

Anastasia Kingsley

Credits

Photo 1: Dubrovnik, Croatia – Caught – Barry McGee

Photo 2: New York, America – Checking – Inolas

Photo 3: Zagreb, Croatia – The steps – Buco Balkanessi

Photo 4: Opatija, Croatia – Ready – John Cameron

Photo 5: Dubrovnik, Croatia – At the seaside – Radoslaw Maciejewski

Photo 6: Dubrovnik, Croatia – Painting the town red – Bezikus

Photo 7: Atlanta, America – From Jackson Street Bridge – Joe Yates

Photo 8: Vis, Croatia – The island – Ninopavisic

Photo 9: Rovinj, Croatia – Eternal – Igor Karasi

Photo 10: Zagreb, Croatia – Shadowed circle – Zvonimir Atletic

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Lebanon, India, Croatia, Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Javier Gómez
“Maturity, one discovers, has everything to do with the acceptance of ‘not knowing’.” ― Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves
Buenos Aires, Argentina – Between

We are instructed to build our lives to avoid uncertainty on every possible level. Even in our childhood, one of the most frequent questions we are asked is “What do you want to be when you grow up?” We are urged to plot a course for our future and walk that path without deviation. We fear the unknown, perhaps more than anything else. While that emotion manifests itself on a very basic level as our fear of the dark, it is certainly present in every aspect of our existence. We can tolerate a Monday to Friday job because we more or less know what to expect from our daily routine, and the weekend is always waiting for us.

Argentina – Neutral

On less obvious levels, the unknown is also the enemy. If we don’t know the answer to a question, we often try to concoct it instead of simply admitting our ignorance. In social situations, we try to come across as knowledgeable and witty, and it’s easier to smile and nod if we have no clue about what’s being discussed. Perhaps that’s why we hoard data and facts and trivia in our heads compulsively, yet we fail to invest time in getting to know ourselves. We close many doors without even peeking behind them, especially when it comes to our minds and personalities. For years, I created an identity based on what I do for a living and the various forms of art that I enjoy. I surrounded myself with people who behaved in a similar way, and we were all perched in our mountain of absolutisms and hyperboles, looking down on everyone and everything that didn’t fit into our sphere of interest. Almost without realizing it, I had become what I hated the most: an arrogant, smug intellectual who hid all his insecurities behind sarcasm and irony. Cheers to me.

London, UK – A blur

As time went on, the road took me to different countries and cultures and the know-it-all façade started to crack. It was slow at first, some instances of “maybe,” “huh,” and “I didn’t know that” started to pop-up in my speech. I could no longer have long discussions about people and places that I only knew from books or websites. I started questioning social axioms. I left my 100% science-oriented mind and started to dabble in a more holistic point of view about the world, health and well-being. Meditation replaced medication and I started fighting causes instead of symptoms. I took a deep dive into uncertainty about myself, my career, my whole life.

London, UK – Wondering

During that process, a pattern started to emerge. Whenever I had no idea about something, be it a person, a place or an activity, my old self fought to re-emerge and tried to form a mental image of it based on what I thought I knew. I had to remind myself that in order to learn, I needed to admit that I didn’t have the answers. I had to face the fact that I was either wrong or uninformed about a plethora of subjects, and that was great because it left room for growth.

La Plata, Argentina – Bi…

Several years passed and I became too comfortable in my new point of view. I knew who I was, I knew what my profession was and I thought I knew how I wanted to live. Except that I really didn’t, and I didn’t know I didn’t. In May 2017, someone very important for me died. She was my grandmother, but she was always a sort of inadvertent philosophical teacher. As it usually happens, I didn’t process it right away. I kept going with my daily routine for several months until a New Year’s trip to Scandinavia gave me time to ponder existence while contemplating frozen, desolate landscapes. And thus I found out that something was off. That the death of the wisest woman I have ever known had hit me harder than I wanted to admit because it forced me to look closer at what I was doing with my time. And the answer was that I wasn’t sure.

London, UK – Outside

Uncertainty had painted all the roadmaps. I entered full existential crisis mode; something that I thought only had a place in my teenage years. You know that hollow feeling when you stare through the window and everything looks gray and half-dead? Well, I do live in England and it’s usually gray here, but you get the idea. It took me several months to understand that I had to embrace the magic of not having a clue in order to understand it. What do I want to do? Who do I want to be? Will I have a different answer tomorrow? I still don’t know, but I’m happy with it because it means I can be anything I like for as long as I want.

London, UK – Black and orange

Uncertainty shouldn’t necessarily mean being afraid. It can also mean flexibility of thought, of ideas, of emotions. Your path does not need to be a straight line set from the get-go. And I already knew it, but I didn’t really know it. I still struggled to hold on to certainty because it was safer. Even in a freelance life, I had found a routine and a set of relatively unchangeable aspects that defined a comfort zone. We are all programmed to do that, but we also know that we can change it. Is it easy? No, it’s not. Is it fun? It can be if you allow it. At least I know it’s a better use of your time than wondering how that trip, that job, that activity or that place would be while you tell yourself that now is not the right moment to try it. But what do I know? I am full of uncertainty.

Javier Gómez

Credits

Photo 1: Andino, Argentina – Straight ahead – Esteban Trivelli

Photo 2: Buenos Aires, Argentina – Between – Julian Gentilezza

Photo 3: Argentina – Neutral – Brad Lloyd

Photo 4: London, UK – A blur – kamilpetran

Photo 5: London, UK – Wondering – Keith Camilleri

Photo 6: La Plata, Argentina – Bi… – Brad Lloyd

Photo 7: London, UK – Outside – Clem Onojeghuo

Photo 8: London, UK – Black and orange – Kid Circus

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Lebanon, India, Croatia, Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Toni Wallis

Bradley* wakes up at three in the morning. His wife, Lynette*, wakes up even earlier to prepare breakfast for the family and pack lunches for themselves and the children (who will wake up after they leave). By four they are ready to leave the house.

The two walk together to the taxi rank, before parting ways: Lynette takes a minibus taxi (16 seat van that often packs in as many as 25 passengers) to the airport where she supervises a cleaning crew. Bradley catches a taxi to the other side of Cape Town where he works as a metered taxi driver. It will take them one-and-a-half to two hours to get to work by negotiating the complex network of minibus taxis that reach every part of the city.

Eastern Cape, South Africa – On

Bradley was chatting to me about his life early one cold winter morning in Cape Town a few months ago, as he drove me to the airport at 3.45 am to catch a flight. He was at the end of a 24-hour shift and anxious to get home before his wife left the house for the day.

Bradley and Lynette’s story is not unique, but it provides a snapshot of the lives of millions of South Africans in the laboring class. It’s a tough life of long hours for little pay. But it’s a job. With an official unemployment rate of 24 percent, many people choose to endure difficult conditions rather than risk the onsekerheid of prolonged unemployment.

Musina, South Africa – Fashion on the street

“Dis moelik (it’s difficult),” Bradley tells me. A few months earlier, he had been offered a nicer job with shorter working hours driving tourists. He turned it down, he says, “because the pay was kak (rubbish). No way the wife and I could make ends meet, not the way things are going. I thank God for this job. Some of my colleagues were laid off last year and are still looking for work.”

South Africa – My brother

Uncertainty is the daily bread of the majority of our people. Those who have jobs hold on to them desperately. But even that doesn’t seem to be enough anymore. The cost of living is on the rise. Earlier this year, the South African government made the decision to increase the value added tax (VAT) by one percent to raise much needed public funds and channel them towards poverty reduction. The problem with that, of course, is that now everyone – both rich and poor have to pay 15 percent tax on almost everything, with few exceptions.

Musina, South Africa – More fashion on the street

Despite this, salaries have not increased, and many small to medium sized enterprises, also under the pressure of rising costs of production, are struggling to stay afloat in an economy that is experiencing a technical recession (two consecutive quarters of negative growth). Downsizing and more job cuts make people fear that their jobs are no longer safe.

Even what we earn is no longer enough to live on. Forty-one percent of working-class South Africans run out of money before month-end and need to take out loans to buy food.1 This uncertainty of constant debt hanging over our shoulders makes it very difficult to plan for the future – such as moving to a bigger home or a better neighborhood, buying a car, or planning for our children’s education.

Fordsburg, South Africa – The weekend

Bradley heads down the still quiet, pre-dawn highway, past the Langa informal settlement, a shanty town that lines the route to the airport and is home to some 60,000 Cape Tonians. He points beyond the tin shanties, saying: “I live over there, in Manenberg.”

“How do you manage with all the crime?” I ask. Manenberg is notorious for gang violence which often turns the impoverished suburb into a war zone. The situation has become so bad that the provincial government has called on parliament to deploy the army to fight the gangs.2 In the meantime, it is up to a very stretched police force to try and contain the violence.

Stellenbosch, South Africa – On the street

“What can I mos do?” Bradley retorts with resignation in his voice. “That’s where the wife and I have our house. We’re sandwiched between two rival gangs. The skelms (criminals) attack people walking to the taxis in the morning. I worry about my wife when I’m on a night shift and she must walk alone.” He looks at his watch with concern. “She’s leaving (the house) now. I hope she is safe. But you never know. Maybe one day it’s you.”

Nieu Bethesda, South Africa – Headed out

In this twilight zone overrun by underworld gangs, even life itself is uncertain.

Our most recent crime statistics revealed that there are 56 reported murders in South Africa each day, that is, 35.8 murders per every 100,000 people.3 According to the figures, 428 reported assaults and 379 robberies take place each day throughout South Africa. There are 110 sexual assaults reported daily, but it is thought that these figures are far lower than the actual numbers because rape still goes mostly unreported. A large majority of these crimes take place in impoverished communities like Langa and Manenberg, making life a daily battle for survival.

Johannesburg, South Africa – Waste pickers

As we enter the airport I thank Bradley for sharing his story and wish for better days for him and his family. “Ag, it’s not so bad,” he replies. “As long as my meisie kind (little girl) grows up, finishes school, stays away from the gangs, gets a job and leaves this life, I’m happy. Then all this is worth it.”

For Bradley and his family, and countless South Africans, onsekerheid is our daily bread. Job insecurity, rising prices, stagnant salaries and rampant crime all stand in the way of its desired antithesis – sekerheid.

South Africa – Life changes

Despite all this, our people are resilient. Like Bradley, we carry a smile on our faces – even in adversity – and are generous to those who have even less than us. We remain upbeat in our hardships and dream of better days, or at the very least, that our children will have a more certain and brighter future.

Toni Wallis

* Bradley and Lynette are not their real names.

Footnotes

1. —- (2018). “Too much month at the end of the money for 41% of SA city dwellers,“ fin24, July 27

2. Davis, R (2018). “DA wants to send the army into the Cape Flats – communities not so much,” Daily Maverick, July 19

3. —- (2018). “FACTSHEET: South Africa’s crime statistics for 2017/18,” Africa Check, 17 September

Credits

Photo 1: Kalahari, South Africa – Dawn – EcoPrint

Photo 2: Eastern Cape, South Africa – On – Angelo Moleele

Photo 3: Musina, South Africa – Fashion on the street – Eva Mont

Photo 4: South Africa – My brother – Anaya Katlego

Photo 5: Musina, South Africa – More fashion on the street – Eva Mont

Photo 6: Fordsburg, South Africa – The weekend – Richard van der Spuy

Photo 7: Stellenbosch, South Africa – On the street – Chrisontour

Photo 8: Nieu Bethesda, South Africa – Headed out – Richard van der Spuy

Photo 9: Johannesburg, South Africa – Waste pickers – Vladan Radulovic

Photo 10: South Africa – Life changes – Anaya Katlego

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Argentina, Lebanon, India, Croatia, Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Lian Pang

Not long after graduating from college, I was offered a good position as an overseas in-house translator for a decent company. Many of my peers back then were preparing for exams and interviews to enter master’s programs. Tired of school and unwilling to turn down the position, I jumped right in and started my career. However, after working here and there for five years, I found myself wanting to pick up where I left off and pursue a master’s degree.

Chuxiong, China – Neutral

It was a tough choice. Joining a full-time master’s program would mean halting my career and spending all my savings for something that may or may not benefit me. I was well into my twenties. Would going back to school for two years be worth the time? I needed a little while to really think and evaluate. I quit my day job, came back from abroad and started a small business to earn a living. At the same time I sat down and did some solid thinking.

One whole year was spent making the decision and preparations. Then I sold my business, said goodbye to my colleagues and left my homeland yet again – this time to become a full-time graduate student.

Chong Quing, China – Waiting

Many fresh undergraduates face the same question that I did: Should I get a master’s degree while I’m still familiar with the work from my bachelor’s degree or should I get a job first? Honestly, although a master’s degree may get you a fatter paycheck and give you (arguably) higher status, undergraduates sometimes have an easier time actually finding a job. Many of my friends with a master’s started with the same salary as I did when I graduated. But some of them later climbed quickly up the career ladder and ended up earning a lot more than an employee with a bachelor’s.

Studying for a master’s degree is a commitment of time, effort and energy. And the outcome is always uncertain. Before you make such an important decision, there are a few questions to ponder first.

China – Reading

What am I looking for?

You may want to continue and get a master’s degree immediately if you wish to become an academic or know exactly what your field is. But if you are not sure and may consider changing your career later, it might be best to postpone graduate school. Entering a master’s program is the easiest way to change your field later on. One of my friends switched from linguistics to law and became a lawyer after graduate school. It is very important that you know exactly what your goal is before anything else.

Kunming, China – Passengers

Do I have the financial means?

Let’s be realistic here. Graduate schools are expensive. Except for the tuition, you need to pay for room and board, books and office supplies, etc. In principle, there are four ways you can get funded: scholarships, self-funding, student loans or parental support. One of the advantages to getting a master’s later is that you can fund yourself with the money saved from work and be an independent student. But by the time you graduate, you may have gone overboard and used up all your savings and have to start with nothing all over again. If you have abundant financial support from your parents, or the school is willing to grant you a scholarship, heading straight into a master’s program might not be a bad idea. Personally, I think it’s risky to take out loans for a master’s degree which probably won’t yield benefits quickly. Before you know it, you may get caught knee-deep in a swamp of debts over the next couple of years!

Shanghai, China – East Nanjing Road

How is the job market?

Today’s job market is highly competitive and changes constantly. As I mentioned earlier, sometimes a person with a bachelor’s degree has it easier than one with a master’s when it comes to landing a job. Some employers, based on my experience, prefer undergraduates because they are like “a piece of blank paper” and easier to train, while graduates are equally without experience but are “more arrogant” and “demand more.” Companies value experience more than a diploma. If there is a good offer right after college, it is wiser to go for the job first. Later when you pursue your master’s degree, you will be able to combine practice with theory and gain deeper insights than your classmates. With several years of work experience plus a higher diploma under your belt, your competitiveness will be greatly enhanced and you may finally find your dream job. There are even instances where employers are willing to pay for your master’s program or offer some benefits.

Shanghai, China – Nanjing Road

Do I have the motivation?

Whether you are looking for a master’s program right after college or prepared to pursue a higher degree after prior work, you need the motivation to go through with it. Even more so if you are entering a part-time degree program. It can be exhausting to juggle work responsibilities and a master’s thesis. Not only is it a time commitment, you also need to dedicate considerable effort to finish what has been started.

Guangzhou, China – On the banks

After countless hours of writing my thesis and studying for exams, I will finally graduate and get that shiny master’s diploma in a couple of months. With six years of experience working, I stand out quite a bit in the search for a position and have already received several offers. But the balance in my bank account is close to zero, and I need to start over just like a fresh undergraduate. Do I regret halting my career and pursuing this degree? Not really. But yes, sometimes I still wonder: What would have happened if I had chosen to get a master’s right after college?

Lian Pang

Credits

Photo 1: China – Red – Linh Dao

Photo 2: Chuxiong, China – Neutral – Buek kingdom

Photo 3: Chong Quing, China – Waiting – Iwzee

Photo 4: China – Reading – rongyiquan

Photo 5: Kunming, China – Passengers – Chutharat Kamkhuntee

Photo 6: Shanghai, China – East Nanjing Road – pruciatti

Photo 7: Shanghai, China – Nanjing Road – TonyV

Photo 8: Guangzhou, China – On the banks – S.L. Sio

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from South Africa, Argentina, Lebanon, India, Croatia, Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed