Transposing emblem by Sanjay Kumar Ray

In a televised address to the nation on November 8, 2016, India’s Prime Minister took the nation by surprise and announced the demonetization of the 1000 and 500 rupee notes in a major assault on black money, fake currency and corruption. The country needed several months to come to terms with the after-effects. Raju, the local street vendor had some Rs 500 notes that he had saved for the marriage of his daughter in distant Rajasthan. For the next few days his daily work started with standing in the bank queue to exchange demonetized notes before the deadline. Although this measure was taken with the good intention of curbing illegal money, it created uncertainty in the minds of the people from day one. The deadlines for exchanging notes were often changed or advanced, and new objectives like bringing more people into the banking system and turning India into a cashless economy were added to it. It took several days for Raju to get his notes exchanged.

Haridwar, India – Crossing

Beforehand, he got a unique identification card, called Aadhar (a 12-digit number that can be obtained by residents of India, based on their biometric and demographic data). It is no simple job to issue a billion people identity cards containing biometric data. Often, news broke out about the safety of citizen’s biometric data collected in this way, although Raju still does not fully comprehend what it means to have one’s own personal data compromised. And there is still controversy as to whether and how much of it will be used for identity purposes.

Jaipur, India – Connected

Although India has made tremendous progress in digital technology, many of its citizens are still illiterate, many do not have a place to keep the card, cannot read what is written there or do not know how to use it. Raju, being literate himself, has never used a computer. This card helped him prove his identity in a foreign city for the first time and receive government subsidies.

Vrindavan, India – Approaching

In the queue, Raju became friends with a 70-year-old pensioner named Mr. Sharma, who was there to exchange the Rs 1000 note he had saved for emergencies. Mr. Sharma can be called a member of the upwardly mobile middle class in the country. Although he has a laptop at home, Mr. Sharma is more at ease visiting the bank branch, but this visit had changed quite a bit with the long queues every day. The computer is not his cup of tea; while he cannot get used to holding a computer mouse in his hand, our Raju can hold a real mouse in his hand, but has never put his hands on a computer one. All these people are affected because they have no other way to exchange money after the demonetization drive started. They need real cash to pay the bills. And standing in a queue is the only way to beat uncertainty.

Hyderabad, India – In line

Technically, Raju’s income puts him below the poverty line (defined as earning $1.90 per day1) and is a card holder. Hence, it was indeed a matter of joy for him when the bank manager one day asked Raju to stand in another queue in order to open a bank account. The Indian government’s ambitious financial inclusion scheme called Jan Dhan Yojana brought 310 million Indians into the formal banking system by March 2018. According to the World Bank, the country still has 190 million adults without a bank account.2 Raju has to keep track of his new bank status now so that unscrupulous people do not misuse his account. During the demonetization drive there was news that some influential people were using the bank accounts of poor people to stash black money. His was a no-frills account, initially with a zero balance facility. Very soon, banks, overburdened with huge NPAs (Non-Performing Assets) accumulated due to large home development loan defaulters, started to penalize people for not maintaining a minimum balance in their accounts. After a huge outcry, banks were forced to reduce the penalty for not keeping the minimum balance. Some of the big names who defaulted were business tycoons, famous for organizing extravagant shows and appearing on page 3 of the newspapers and tabloids. Raju wonders: did these people ever stand in a queue! As for Raju, he does not mind standing in that queue to become included in the financial mainstream of the country. Why should he bother? He is already used to getting up very early in the morning with his fellow cohabitants in the cluster where he resides, to reach the very first queue of the day – to fetch water from the municipal outlets or water tanker, since the bore wells often refuse to discharge any water during the summer months. As a disciplined citizen, Raju bravely faces the uncertainties of falling levels in the water reservoirs and the disintegration of the environment around him due to the accumulation of waste and garbage. Only god is saving this country from disaster – Raju believes, and happily goes to stand in another queue.

New Delhi, India – Pumping water

Raju knows his friend Mr. Sharma was not without worries either. Consistently falling interest rates eat up pensioners own savings and more and more Mr. Sharmas receive less and less money from the bank.

As financial uncertainty had been reigning in the country for quite some time, news came from India’s unquiet borders, raising doubts about sustained peace among neighbors. Due to 24 hours of TV beaming into homes and offices, the news from the borders reaches people very fast, and nobody is sure what is happening on the border or why. India fought four wars with Pakistan, hundreds of soldiers died on both sides of the border. And in between these conflicts, India has been fighting proxy wars in the northern state of Kashmir. Soldiers in the regular army, paramilitary forces and local police are engaged in fierce battles to thwart attempts by terrorists and infiltrators in Kashmir. If long-standing disputes among nations in Europe and Asia can be mutually and peacefully settled, if two Vietnams and two Germanys can unite and ensure peace, then why can’t we have peace on our borders, Raju asks his friend Mr. Sharma. 70 years have passed since India gained independence from British rule. The present generation of political leaders was born after independence. The question is, when will somebody come out and say enough is enough; let peace be given a chance. It seems on a few occasions, both countries were almost on the point of reaching an agreement, but due to some reasons better known to politicians, the peace remained as elusive as ever – Mr. Sharma explains.

Jaipur, India – Possible

One queue Raju dreads is when one of his children falls ill and needs to visit the local government hospitals. The health care system in the country is mostly managed by the private sector. While medical tourism is booming in the country, the government hospitals are overburdened and doctors are overworked; patients wait in the thousands for an appointment or test. Remember, patients like Mr. Sharma are among those who can go to the capitals of the country and states for specialized treatment, but millions in the hinterland are at the mercy of the vagaries of uncertainty. Mr. Sharma has explained to Raju that we have to bear the fallout of development and higher GDP, while the glaciers are melting, rivers are drying up and getting polluted, the water level is going down, the increasing use of fossil fuels adds to the pollution, cities get choked, and people often become ill. The country is precariously dependent on the import of crude oil from countries in the conflict zones, and the country’s competition with the behemoth China is taking its toll in its search for a distinct Indian path of development.

Varanasi, India – To the river

Raju is better off economically now and no longer wishes to go back to his village, but is very concerned about the uncertain future of his children. At the moment, however, there is something else he needs to ensure. And so…

He rushes off to stand in the next queue.

Sanjay Kumar Ray

Notes

1. “Below the Poverty Line – India.” Wikipedia. Access: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Below_Poverty_Line_(India)

2. “19 crore Indian adults don’t have bank account: World Bank.” The Times of India. Access: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/business/india-business/19-crore-indian-adults-dont-have-bank-account-world-bank/articleshow/63833962.cms

Credits

Photo 1: New Delhi, India – In the alley – Palash Jain

Photo 2: Haridwar, India – Crossing – Swapnll Dwivedi

Photo 3: Jaipur, India – Connected – Annie Spratt

Photo 4: Vrindavan, India – Approaching – Fancycrave

Photo 5: Hyderabad, India – In line – Reddees

Photo 6: New Delhi, India – Pumping water – Patrick Beznoska

Photo 7: Jaipur, India – Possible – Annie Spratt

Photo 8: Varanasi, India – To the river – Thomas Young

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Kingsley, Anastasia. Expect the Unexpected. November 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Armenia, Brazil, Jordan, Mexico, Germany/Spain, Bosnia, and then on to the Syncretion of Polarization and Extremes…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Anastasia Kingsley
Here in Croatia, it is not wise to take things for granted.
“Bit će ako bude” – “It will be if it is [meant to be],”
“ako bog da” – “if God wills it.”
New York, America – Checking

In my native America, where I was born of European immigrants from (surprise) Croatia, people aren’t so passive. We take charge of life, as you know. To grab the brass ring, one must study, learn, network and (let’s face it) brown-nose. Most college graduates in the US expect to achieve the majority of their goals. Perhaps they won’t be CEOs or millionaires, but they do expect to reach a pinnacle of success demonstrated by nice automobiles, an attractive spouse and children, trophies like swanky vacations at least here and there, and a slice of the American apple pie. Why not go for the American dream? I can do it too!

Zagreb, Croatia – The steps

After living in Croatia for nearly 20 years, it simply isn’t so here. Imagine a dog that has been beaten too many times. Instead of anticipating a warm pat on the head, he is already cringing and preparing for the baton.

Young children are very well educated, learning English in nursery school with their parents’ hopes of beating the odds and experiencing some kind of economic security that will bring them peace of mind. More often than not, that would be a government job. Until very recently, many people had only one job all their lives. Get hired at 20 and retire at 60, particularly if you are lucky (or well-connected enough) to land a government job (at city hall, the police department or post office, etc.), but even that is no guarantee anymore.

Opatija, Croatia – Ready

Americans know something a little different – get a job and then, get a side hustle. Maybe then, and only then, will you live the good life, and not be at the mercy of one’s employer who may, on a whim, decide to let you go. Croatians have always moonlighted, but they think some options like working online seem a little bit unbelievable. In the past Yugoslavia, factory jobs were generally from 6 am to 2 pm, then family lunch time, a nap, and, at the end of the day, watch the evening news – and – Laku Noć (good night)! The pay wasn’t anything spectacular, probably half of what people now earn. The monetary unit was the Dinar, the standard was low, and leaving the country was out of the question, as was going on any type of holiday (except maybe to the seaside, particularly if you have a relative in Dalmatia).

Dubrovnik, Croatia – At the seaside

During the days of communism, families, like kittens, clumped together. Three generations in the same apartment (stan) was not unusual. Nowadays, grandma or grandpa are on one floor of the house, and the kids (with their spouse and offspring) live very close by, often on another floor, but there is some privacy, thank goodness. And the relationships have changed too. Back then, the man might occasionally cheat on his wife or beat her, but families stuck together. Nowadays, divorce isn’t on every corner, but it is certainly on every street.

Dubrovnik, Croatia – Painting the town red

To many people now, those were the good old days because two or three household members were employed, plus maybe a pensioner, so – although funds were tight – families were closely knit and no one starved. It does sound better in some ways than what we have today – four people at the table, each with his or her own electronic device – but it wasn’t paradise.

Atlanta, America – From Jackson Street Bridge

Another huge cultural difference is the idea that getting your paycheck in Croatia will happen, sooner or later, so just be patient and wait. And don’t complain, or else you might get fired and then you really won’t get anything. Logical? In the US, perhaps due to slavery, getting paid is an inalienable right. Even companies on the verge of bankruptcy will “of course” pay their employees. In Croatia, you can’t expect that. It all depends. Those who work in a hotel by the sea may wait for months until the summer season begins before receiving their pay from the following winter and spring. Maybe they will get half of their salary. Hopefully.

Vis, Croatia – The island

How do these people survive? They have a reserve fund – yes, savings. Even the poorest widow knows how to put money aside for her grandchild’s graduation present. Second, nearly every Croat I know has access to a small plot of land to plant seasonal vegetables. What isn’t eaten is frozen, and fruit trees are for canning and making homemade jams (marmalada) to spread on the crepes (palačhinka). Lunch is large, delicious and filling; soup or salad and a main dish, with dry bread for dipping the last droplet of sauce on the plate. However, dinners here are very modest; typically yogurt, or a plate of steamed potatoes and Swiss chard (blitva) seasoned with salt and pepper, garlic and homemade olive oil. (YUM!)

Rovinj, Croatia – Eternal

Third, they have faith in God. If they could survive Yugoslavia, the war, and now, the EU, they can certainly find a way to survive this. That is, if God wills it. The Croatian religion is predominantly Catholic, in a Mediterranean kind of way. I.e., young couples sleep together before marriage in the parents’ home if he or she is a good boy or girl. They definitely go to church as a type of insurance policy so that if worse comes to worse, they will be protected from evil. As a result, God keeps a scorecard of 90% mass attendance and rewards those who sacrifice Sunday mornings in church by giving them job security, healthy children and only mild illnesses during the cold and flu season. However, the younger generation is questioning this system, as well as the existence of God.

Zagreb, Croatia – Shadowed circle

In general, however, there is a type of helplessness that no one wants to talk about: Where are the jobs? What will the future hold? Does entrepreneurialism stand a chance? Will western apathy and immorality pollute the clear water of safety, fresh food and overall goodness that still exists here, on a yet underdeveloped level? We do not know the answers. But one thing can be expected: the unexpected.

Anastasia Kingsley

Credits

Photo 1: Dubrovnik, Croatia – Caught – Barry McGee

Photo 2: New York, America – Checking – Inolas

Photo 3: Zagreb, Croatia – The steps – Buco Balkanessi

Photo 4: Opatija, Croatia – Ready – John Cameron

Photo 5: Dubrovnik, Croatia – At the seaside – Radoslaw Maciejewski

Photo 6: Dubrovnik, Croatia – Painting the town red – Bezikus

Photo 7: Atlanta, America – From Jackson Street Bridge – Joe Yates

Photo 8: Vis, Croatia – The island – Ninopavisic

Photo 9: Rovinj, Croatia – Eternal – Igor Karasi

Photo 10: Zagreb, Croatia – Shadowed circle – Zvonimir Atletic

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Gómez, Javier. Uncharted Bliss. October 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Lebanon, India, Croatia, Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Javier Gómez
“Maturity, one discovers, has everything to do with the acceptance of ‘not knowing’.” ― Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves
Buenos Aires, Argentina – Between

We are instructed to build our lives to avoid uncertainty on every possible level. Even in our childhood, one of the most frequent questions we are asked is “What do you want to be when you grow up?” We are urged to plot a course for our future and walk that path without deviation. We fear the unknown, perhaps more than anything else. While that emotion manifests itself on a very basic level as our fear of the dark, it is certainly present in every aspect of our existence. We can tolerate a Monday to Friday job because we more or less know what to expect from our daily routine, and the weekend is always waiting for us.

Argentina – Neutral

On less obvious levels, the unknown is also the enemy. If we don’t know the answer to a question, we often try to concoct it instead of simply admitting our ignorance. In social situations, we try to come across as knowledgeable and witty, and it’s easier to smile and nod if we have no clue about what’s being discussed. Perhaps that’s why we hoard data and facts and trivia in our heads compulsively, yet we fail to invest time in getting to know ourselves. We close many doors without even peeking behind them, especially when it comes to our minds and personalities. For years, I created an identity based on what I do for a living and the various forms of art that I enjoy. I surrounded myself with people who behaved in a similar way, and we were all perched in our mountain of absolutisms and hyperboles, looking down on everyone and everything that didn’t fit into our sphere of interest. Almost without realizing it, I had become what I hated the most: an arrogant, smug intellectual who hid all his insecurities behind sarcasm and irony. Cheers to me.

London, UK – A blur

As time went on, the road took me to different countries and cultures and the know-it-all façade started to crack. It was slow at first, some instances of “maybe,” “huh,” and “I didn’t know that” started to pop-up in my speech. I could no longer have long discussions about people and places that I only knew from books or websites. I started questioning social axioms. I left my 100% science-oriented mind and started to dabble in a more holistic point of view about the world, health and well-being. Meditation replaced medication and I started fighting causes instead of symptoms. I took a deep dive into uncertainty about myself, my career, my whole life.

London, UK – Wondering

During that process, a pattern started to emerge. Whenever I had no idea about something, be it a person, a place or an activity, my old self fought to re-emerge and tried to form a mental image of it based on what I thought I knew. I had to remind myself that in order to learn, I needed to admit that I didn’t have the answers. I had to face the fact that I was either wrong or uninformed about a plethora of subjects, and that was great because it left room for growth.

La Plata, Argentina – Bi…

Several years passed and I became too comfortable in my new point of view. I knew who I was, I knew what my profession was and I thought I knew how I wanted to live. Except that I really didn’t, and I didn’t know I didn’t. In May 2017, someone very important for me died. She was my grandmother, but she was always a sort of inadvertent philosophical teacher. As it usually happens, I didn’t process it right away. I kept going with my daily routine for several months until a New Year’s trip to Scandinavia gave me time to ponder existence while contemplating frozen, desolate landscapes. And thus I found out that something was off. That the death of the wisest woman I have ever known had hit me harder than I wanted to admit because it forced me to look closer at what I was doing with my time. And the answer was that I wasn’t sure.

London, UK – Outside

Uncertainty had painted all the roadmaps. I entered full existential crisis mode; something that I thought only had a place in my teenage years. You know that hollow feeling when you stare through the window and everything looks gray and half-dead? Well, I do live in England and it’s usually gray here, but you get the idea. It took me several months to understand that I had to embrace the magic of not having a clue in order to understand it. What do I want to do? Who do I want to be? Will I have a different answer tomorrow? I still don’t know, but I’m happy with it because it means I can be anything I like for as long as I want.

London, UK – Black and orange

Uncertainty shouldn’t necessarily mean being afraid. It can also mean flexibility of thought, of ideas, of emotions. Your path does not need to be a straight line set from the get-go. And I already knew it, but I didn’t really know it. I still struggled to hold on to certainty because it was safer. Even in a freelance life, I had found a routine and a set of relatively unchangeable aspects that defined a comfort zone. We are all programmed to do that, but we also know that we can change it. Is it easy? No, it’s not. Is it fun? It can be if you allow it. At least I know it’s a better use of your time than wondering how that trip, that job, that activity or that place would be while you tell yourself that now is not the right moment to try it. But what do I know? I am full of uncertainty.

Javier Gómez

Credits

Photo 1: Andino, Argentina – Straight ahead – Esteban Trivelli

Photo 2: Buenos Aires, Argentina – Between – Julian Gentilezza

Photo 3: Argentina – Neutral – Brad Lloyd

Photo 4: London, UK – A blur – kamilpetran

Photo 5: London, UK – Wondering – Keith Camilleri

Photo 6: La Plata, Argentina – Bi… – Brad Lloyd

Photo 7: London, UK – Outside – Clem Onojeghuo

Photo 8: London, UK – Black and orange – Kid Circus

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Wallis, Toni. Living for Today – South Africa. October 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Lebanon, India, Croatia, Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Toni Wallis

Bradley* wakes up at three in the morning. His wife, Lynette*, wakes up even earlier to prepare breakfast for the family and pack lunches for themselves and the children (who will wake up after they leave). By four they are ready to leave the house.

The two walk together to the taxi rank, before parting ways: Lynette takes a minibus taxi (16 seat van that often packs in as many as 25 passengers) to the airport where she supervises a cleaning crew. Bradley catches a taxi to the other side of Cape Town where he works as a metered taxi driver. It will take them one-and-a-half to two hours to get to work by negotiating the complex network of minibus taxis that reach every part of the city.

Eastern Cape, South Africa – On

Bradley was chatting to me about his life early one cold winter morning in Cape Town a few months ago, as he drove me to the airport at 3.45 am to catch a flight. He was at the end of a 24-hour shift and anxious to get home before his wife left the house for the day.

Bradley and Lynette’s story is not unique, but it provides a snapshot of the lives of millions of South Africans in the laboring class. It’s a tough life of long hours for little pay. But it’s a job. With an official unemployment rate of 24 percent, many people choose to endure difficult conditions rather than risk the onsekerheid of prolonged unemployment.

Musina, South Africa – Fashion on the street

“Dis moelik (it’s difficult),” Bradley tells me. A few months earlier, he had been offered a nicer job with shorter working hours driving tourists. He turned it down, he says, “because the pay was kak (rubbish). No way the wife and I could make ends meet, not the way things are going. I thank God for this job. Some of my colleagues were laid off last year and are still looking for work.”

South Africa – My brother

Uncertainty is the daily bread of the majority of our people. Those who have jobs hold on to them desperately. But even that doesn’t seem to be enough anymore. The cost of living is on the rise. Earlier this year, the South African government made the decision to increase the value added tax (VAT) by one percent to raise much needed public funds and channel them towards poverty reduction. The problem with that, of course, is that now everyone – both rich and poor have to pay 15 percent tax on almost everything, with few exceptions.

Musina, South Africa – More fashion on the street

Despite this, salaries have not increased, and many small to medium sized enterprises, also under the pressure of rising costs of production, are struggling to stay afloat in an economy that is experiencing a technical recession (two consecutive quarters of negative growth). Downsizing and more job cuts make people fear that their jobs are no longer safe.

Even what we earn is no longer enough to live on. Forty-one percent of working-class South Africans run out of money before month-end and need to take out loans to buy food.1 This uncertainty of constant debt hanging over our shoulders makes it very difficult to plan for the future – such as moving to a bigger home or a better neighborhood, buying a car, or planning for our children’s education.

Fordsburg, South Africa – The weekend

Bradley heads down the still quiet, pre-dawn highway, past the Langa informal settlement, a shanty town that lines the route to the airport and is home to some 60,000 Cape Tonians. He points beyond the tin shanties, saying: “I live over there, in Manenberg.”

“How do you manage with all the crime?” I ask. Manenberg is notorious for gang violence which often turns the impoverished suburb into a war zone. The situation has become so bad that the provincial government has called on parliament to deploy the army to fight the gangs.2 In the meantime, it is up to a very stretched police force to try and contain the violence.

Stellenbosch, South Africa – On the street

“What can I mos do?” Bradley retorts with resignation in his voice. “That’s where the wife and I have our house. We’re sandwiched between two rival gangs. The skelms (criminals) attack people walking to the taxis in the morning. I worry about my wife when I’m on a night shift and she must walk alone.” He looks at his watch with concern. “She’s leaving (the house) now. I hope she is safe. But you never know. Maybe one day it’s you.”

Nieu Bethesda, South Africa – Headed out

In this twilight zone overrun by underworld gangs, even life itself is uncertain.

Our most recent crime statistics revealed that there are 56 reported murders in South Africa each day, that is, 35.8 murders per every 100,000 people.3 According to the figures, 428 reported assaults and 379 robberies take place each day throughout South Africa. There are 110 sexual assaults reported daily, but it is thought that these figures are far lower than the actual numbers because rape still goes mostly unreported. A large majority of these crimes take place in impoverished communities like Langa and Manenberg, making life a daily battle for survival.

Johannesburg, South Africa – Waste pickers

As we enter the airport I thank Bradley for sharing his story and wish for better days for him and his family. “Ag, it’s not so bad,” he replies. “As long as my meisie kind (little girl) grows up, finishes school, stays away from the gangs, gets a job and leaves this life, I’m happy. Then all this is worth it.”

For Bradley and his family, and countless South Africans, onsekerheid is our daily bread. Job insecurity, rising prices, stagnant salaries and rampant crime all stand in the way of its desired antithesis – sekerheid.

South Africa – Life changes

Despite all this, our people are resilient. Like Bradley, we carry a smile on our faces – even in adversity – and are generous to those who have even less than us. We remain upbeat in our hardships and dream of better days, or at the very least, that our children will have a more certain and brighter future.

Toni Wallis

* Bradley and Lynette are not their real names.

Footnotes

1. —- (2018). “Too much month at the end of the money for 41% of SA city dwellers,“ fin24, July 27

2. Davis, R (2018). “DA wants to send the army into the Cape Flats – communities not so much,” Daily Maverick, July 19

3. —- (2018). “FACTSHEET: South Africa’s crime statistics for 2017/18,” Africa Check, 17 September

Credits

Photo 1: Kalahari, South Africa – Dawn – EcoPrint

Photo 2: Eastern Cape, South Africa – On – Angelo Moleele

Photo 3: Musina, South Africa – Fashion on the street – Eva Mont

Photo 4: South Africa – My brother – Anaya Katlego

Photo 5: Musina, South Africa – More fashion on the street – Eva Mont

Photo 6: Fordsburg, South Africa – The weekend – Richard van der Spuy

Photo 7: Stellenbosch, South Africa – On the street – Chrisontour

Photo 8: Nieu Bethesda, South Africa – Headed out – Richard van der Spuy

Photo 9: Johannesburg, South Africa – Waste pickers – Vladan Radulovic

Photo 10: South Africa – Life changes – Anaya Katlego

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Pang, Lian. Now or Later? October 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Argentina, Lebanon, India, Croatia, Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Lian Pang

Not long after graduating from college, I was offered a good position as an overseas in-house translator for a decent company. Many of my peers back then were preparing for exams and interviews to enter master’s programs. Tired of school and unwilling to turn down the position, I jumped right in and started my career. However, after working here and there for five years, I found myself wanting to pick up where I left off and pursue a master’s degree.

Chuxiong, China – Neutral

It was a tough choice. Joining a full-time master’s program would mean halting my career and spending all my savings for something that may or may not benefit me. I was well into my twenties. Would going back to school for two years be worth the time? I needed a little while to really think and evaluate. I quit my day job, came back from abroad and started a small business to earn a living. At the same time I sat down and did some solid thinking.

One whole year was spent making the decision and preparations. Then I sold my business, said goodbye to my colleagues and left my homeland yet again – this time to become a full-time graduate student.

Chong Quing, China – Waiting

Many fresh undergraduates face the same question that I did: Should I get a master’s degree while I’m still familiar with the work from my bachelor’s degree or should I get a job first? Honestly, although a master’s degree may get you a fatter paycheck and give you (arguably) higher status, undergraduates sometimes have an easier time actually finding a job. Many of my friends with a master’s started with the same salary as I did when I graduated. But some of them later climbed quickly up the career ladder and ended up earning a lot more than an employee with a bachelor’s.

Studying for a master’s degree is a commitment of time, effort and energy. And the outcome is always uncertain. Before you make such an important decision, there are a few questions to ponder first.

China – Reading

What am I looking for?

You may want to continue and get a master’s degree immediately if you wish to become an academic or know exactly what your field is. But if you are not sure and may consider changing your career later, it might be best to postpone graduate school. Entering a master’s program is the easiest way to change your field later on. One of my friends switched from linguistics to law and became a lawyer after graduate school. It is very important that you know exactly what your goal is before anything else.

Kunming, China – Passengers

Do I have the financial means?

Let’s be realistic here. Graduate schools are expensive. Except for the tuition, you need to pay for room and board, books and office supplies, etc. In principle, there are four ways you can get funded: scholarships, self-funding, student loans or parental support. One of the advantages to getting a master’s later is that you can fund yourself with the money saved from work and be an independent student. But by the time you graduate, you may have gone overboard and used up all your savings and have to start with nothing all over again. If you have abundant financial support from your parents, or the school is willing to grant you a scholarship, heading straight into a master’s program might not be a bad idea. Personally, I think it’s risky to take out loans for a master’s degree which probably won’t yield benefits quickly. Before you know it, you may get caught knee-deep in a swamp of debts over the next couple of years!

Shanghai, China – East Nanjing Road

How is the job market?

Today’s job market is highly competitive and changes constantly. As I mentioned earlier, sometimes a person with a bachelor’s degree has it easier than one with a master’s when it comes to landing a job. Some employers, based on my experience, prefer undergraduates because they are like “a piece of blank paper” and easier to train, while graduates are equally without experience but are “more arrogant” and “demand more.” Companies value experience more than a diploma. If there is a good offer right after college, it is wiser to go for the job first. Later when you pursue your master’s degree, you will be able to combine practice with theory and gain deeper insights than your classmates. With several years of work experience plus a higher diploma under your belt, your competitiveness will be greatly enhanced and you may finally find your dream job. There are even instances where employers are willing to pay for your master’s program or offer some benefits.

Shanghai, China – Nanjing Road

Do I have the motivation?

Whether you are looking for a master’s program right after college or prepared to pursue a higher degree after prior work, you need the motivation to go through with it. Even more so if you are entering a part-time degree program. It can be exhausting to juggle work responsibilities and a master’s thesis. Not only is it a time commitment, you also need to dedicate considerable effort to finish what has been started.

Guangzhou, China – On the banks

After countless hours of writing my thesis and studying for exams, I will finally graduate and get that shiny master’s diploma in a couple of months. With six years of experience working, I stand out quite a bit in the search for a position and have already received several offers. But the balance in my bank account is close to zero, and I need to start over just like a fresh undergraduate. Do I regret halting my career and pursuing this degree? Not really. But yes, sometimes I still wonder: What would have happened if I had chosen to get a master’s right after college?

Lian Pang

Credits

Photo 1: China – Red – Linh Dao

Photo 2: Chuxiong, China – Neutral – Buek kingdom

Photo 3: Chong Quing, China – Waiting – Iwzee

Photo 4: China – Reading – rongyiquan

Photo 5: Kunming, China – Passengers – Chutharat Kamkhuntee

Photo 6: Shanghai, China – East Nanjing Road – pruciatti

Photo 7: Shanghai, China – Nanjing Road – TonyV

Photo 8: Guangzhou, China – On the banks – S.L. Sio

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Trojnar, Kamila. Ephemeral. October 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from South Africa, Argentina, Lebanon, India, Croatia, Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Kamila Trojnar

Uncertainty is omnipresent. It permeates and even guides the majority of what we are and what kind of decisions we have to make every single day. Would you disagree? Let us then take a look at the reality of all of us in general as well as many of us in Poland. I would argue that uncertainty sticks its nose into every and any aspect of our lives. But there is a way to find a little bit of peace in this chaotic sea of forever uncertain ground.

Bielsko-Biala, Poland – Faceless 

First of all, uncertainty is what underlies the deepest layers of our professional work; whether you are an employee of a company owned by someone else or even more if you run a business on your own. Obviously, we run a company to make ends meet. Some of us will be more successful and others less so but in both cases we will see uncertainty peeping through any hole it can find to enter our business. We have a client today, but will they be with us tomorrow? We have liquidity today, but what if our store collapses tomorrow due to an earthquake? But did I say business life is more volatile? Perhaps I should have thought twice. You might think that with a permanent contract, which means you are employed for an indefinite period of time in Poland, you are safe and there is no reason to worry about where your money will come from tomorrow. Or is there? If you think about it from the perspective of the person you work for, his or her company is facing the same kind of uncertainties about the future as I mentioned before. If the company fails tomorrow, they will fire you the next day. You will have the three-month notice period, but where is your financial stability now?

Wroclaw, Poland – Olawska street

Another area of uncertainty that does not stray far from our previous work-related concerns is our health. I think we would all seriously agree that no health equals no quality of life and often no work either, which leads to no money, and so on and so forth… Losing your health might not only mean you will no longer be capable of doing the same job you have done so far but you may also be suddenly deprived of the chance to enjoy doing all kinds of things you like. And health is such an apparently uncertain treasure. I am sure we all wonder more often than not how easy it is to damage our body or even cut the fragile thread of our lives. How can you ever be sure that the trip to the lake does not end on a tree trunk this time or whether going down the stairs on this particular day does not mean you are heading for disaster. You just never know.

Poznan, Poland – Night

Uncertainty surrounding both our jobs and our health frequently boils down to the unpredictability of our finances since money, in our modern world, is said to be a means to everything. We may argue about whether this is true or not but most of us will quickly agree that money definitely makes life easier and is capable of erasing a lot of uncertainty from our lives – thus giving us a fraction of peace. Unfortunately, the majority of us are not lucky enough to say: “I never have to worry about money,” and so we are all anxious about whether what we have today is going to last. Some of us go even further and ask ourselves if what we have today is not going to be wasted on some futile endeavors. And here we come to the topic of investment, perhaps more relevant than ever in our Polish political reality today. Everything seems unstable right now. Will I find justice in court? Will I be able to afford taxes and social security contributions? Will other market players survive so that we can all prosper instead of failing in a recession? Is it worth investing in Poland if you are not sure whether your rights are going to be respected? It is like trying to maneuver on quicksand.

Krakow, Poland – Florianska 57

These are all very important questions and the examination of them continues in our life as individuals and families. Many of us Poles often feel that there is no stability in our reality. Politicians will call it transformation and reform but a citizen will often say: testing and programs in schools change almost every year. The rules for running a business and calculating costs change so rapidly, you cannot even trust an accountant to follow them closely. When we started working, you promised that we would retire at that age but then you changed it. How can you strive for certainty in such a capricious environment? Is there anywhere we can look for stable ground? After all, there is nothing harder and more stressful then balancing your feet every step you take. No one can stay sane and go on like this forever, can they?

Krakow, Poland – Evening

Well, last but not least, let us take a look at our relationships. Well it sure does sound like another deep sea of uncertainty. For some of us there is nothing less certain than our relationships, especially those of the romantic type. But is it really so? I would argue that we can make our relationships this single stable home where we can always come back for love, friendship, and support. In this forever whirling cyclone of chaos, you may stand in its eye, hugging the dearest people to you, and you will all survive the storm of uncertainty. You, together, may withstand its violence because every time one person’s foot slips, there is another person to grab their arm. And besides, if we leave the romantic relationships aside with all their unpredictable twists and turns, there are also the relationships with our children. Is there anything stronger and more unbreakable than a bond with your child? Whatever happens in life, this is one stable area where you can be certain you love and are loved back. Once again together against uncertainty!

Wroclaw, Poland – Neonside

So if you feel tomorrow might bring a disaster, you will lose your sight, be fired, the government will suddenly decide there is no support for the blind any more, and even your spouse leaves you when you can no longer provide for them.… If you feel you can find no safe rock to place your foot on and feel certain of your choice, then turn to your people – to your dearest friends and the ones you love. It may seem they are sometimes far away but I am more than certain, they will be happy to throw some bigger rocks for you to safely land on.

Kamila Trojnar

Credits

Photo 1: Poznan, Poland – Morning – Erik Witsoe

Photo 2: Bielsko-Biala, Poland – Faceless – Jan Szwagrzyk

Photo 3: Wroclaw, Poland – Olawska street – Lidia Mukhamadeeva

Photo 4: Poznan, Poland – Night – Erik Witsoe

Photo 5: Krakow, Poland – Florianska 57 – Beata Ratuszniak

Photo 6: Krakow, Poland – Evening – Janusz Maniak

Photo 7: Wroclaw, Poland – Neonside – Zuza Galczynska


Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Deiana, Sara. The Dark Side of Perfection. September 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from China, South Africa, Argentina, Lebanon, India, Croatia, Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Sara Deiana

Well, this is something I come to think about quite often: suicide.

No, don’t get me wrong. I don’t think about committing suicide, what I mean is that I think about suicide as a dimension, a door you open and close very quickly, which only people who actually do use that door can embrace. That is it: I find myself thinking about these people, their stories, how they do it and, above all, why they do it. What pushes them to their limits in such a powerful way that they need to be sure to die in the way they choose, and be able to stop bearing the uncertainty of tomorrow?

Auckland, New Zealand – My friend

It is the greatest act of destruction toward ourselves because LA VITA is the only thing we have that we can be sure about. Or it is safer to say is the only certain thing, while we have it. What triggers us to end the most precious of all gifts?

Coromandel, New Zealand – Man

It is almost a paradox that the countries with the highest rate of suicide are often also countries with apparently the highest standard of living in the so-called developed world. I have now been living for a while in a country that is known world-wide for its laid-back approach to life, pristine and endless beaches, snow-capped mountains, breath-taking and magnificent landscapes: New Zealand. But probably not many people are aware of its sad record, this silent health epidemic of suicide. From the outside we can only speculate and try to find the possible reasons: so, when I think about it from a foreigner-living-in-New-Zealand point of view I can see that being such a young country, the “lack” of an old historic heritage can play a huge role in the way people feel and live.

Catlins, New Zealand – Watching the Pacific

It is a real challenge to define what culture truly means in New Zealand; the only real culture I can witness with my own eyes comes from the Maori people, from their values and myths, evidence of which can be found in many toponyms around the North and South Island. The European immigrants who have come here since the beginning of the nineteen century, largely recruited as settlers, were traditional rural craft workers such as builders or blacksmiths and agricultural laborers. These skilled people came to New Zealand to fulfil dreams of independence through the ownership of land. Obviously, these folks were interested in making a living and settling well in a new country so far away from the one they left. Therefore, I believe that it took a few decades for them to focus on the enjoyable things in life, like recreational culture, leisure and arts, consequently losing a bit of the umbilical cord that strongly tied them to their country of origin, also due to the remoteness of their new home.

Auckland, New Zealand – Airborne 

That same geographical isolation and the resulting dependence on imports has created a Do It Yourself culture, which has been a necessity for many centuries, until not so long ago. This peculiar trait has shaped the characters and souls of kiwis (Kiwi is a native bird and unique symbol of the country; New Zealander are colloquially named after this national icon). This can be a good thing, as people are strong, practical and not easily impressed, but if you think in broader terms, it also has its negative side which we see in the widespread belief that everyone, especially men, have to be good with their hands and good on the land, can’t show weakness and have to conceal their emotions and, if they do not do so, they should feel ashamed. So, many boys grow up with the idea that they are not allowed to think, “I can’t do it by myself.” This is known as the “toughen-up” culture, common here in New Zealand and ingrained in kiwis‘ blood. And not surprisingly, the suicide rate is, in fact, higher among young men.

Auckland, New Zealand – Night

Another important aspect of being a kiwi is sport and being outdoors, both of which play a big role in today’s society and lifestyle. If you don’t conform, there’s not really a valid, widely accepted alternative. For example, I just read in today’s newspaper: “as New Zealanders we grow up having a love of the great outdoors and knowing that we have a wonderful country…” It is something that HAS to be that way. You hardly need to be anything else. Again, a good and a bad thing. The prevalent culture is centered around the outdoors, the sport, being strong, masculine, stoic, physically fit and terse. It is common to grow up surrounded by a “boy don’t cry attitude” instilled in you from a young age, which in your adulthood transforms itself into “you need to value achievement and success,” to have tough rugby players as main male role models. This does not necessarily help you find your own way. On the contrary, I think it leads more of us to question ourselves, to ask where we belong, and the uncertainty of a proper personal identity can be perhaps described as an existential void that we are dealing with down here. There is not a huge and diverse culture that works as a protective force and shows us the way, something that act as a soft pillow to fall back on. I suppose we are still feeling our way through things and this makes us feel even more the uncertainty of it all as we haven’t found the right combination yet. The sad statistic (and we are talking about 606 people who took their own lives in 2017 alone; that is, one person dies, by their own hands, every 15 hours) is hard to swallow and even harder to address, but certainly there is a very big lack of access to a cohesive cultural history in New Zealand, a strong reality that can make us all feel less lost.

Auckland, New Zealand – Railed

This may all just be a single opinion, but all these kiwis that became numbers in the statistics must have something in common…

Sara Deiana

Credits

Photo 1: Queenstown, New Zealand – Shotover – Josh Withers

Photo 2: Auckland, New Zealand – My friend – CMDR Shane

Photo 3:  Coromandel, New Zealand – Man – Riekephotos

Photo 4: Catlins, New Zealand – Watching the Pacific – Fijalka

Photo 5: Auckland, New Zealand – Airborne – Henry Mcintosh

Photo 6: Auckland, New Zealand – Night – Samuel Ferrara

Photo 7: Auckland, New Zealand – Railed – Dev


Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Younes, Ghadir. Economic Uncertainty in Life – Lebanon. Part 38.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Britain, Poland, China, Argentina, Lebanon, India, Croatia, Brazil, Mexico and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Ghadir Younes

In a country with a turbulent past and extensive government corruption in the present, uncertainty seems to be the defining element of our lives. This uncertainty manifests itself in our daily economic and financial situation, starting with the lack of jobs and high unemployment rate and extending all the way to insufficient social services and plans to help Lebanon’s poor.

Tyre, Lebanon – After the rain

The journey of uncertainty in Lebanon starts with deciding on our path of education: Does acquiring a technical or a university degree ensure a stable and well-paying job? Statistics concerning employment in Lebanon indicate that the answer is probably “no.” Today, it is estimated that 25% of Lebanese are unemployed – and of those who are employed, a high number are actually working outside of their fields.1 According to Lebanese Labor Minister Mohammad Kabbara, “30,000-35,000 young people graduate from university every year, but only 5,000 jobs are offered annually, which leaves some 30,000 without a position.”2

Tripoli, Lebanon – Fruit

For a long time, the Lebanese have immigrated to neighboring and distant countries to find better opportunities and ensure a stable future. With a relatively safe atmosphere in recent years (compared to a long history of internal and external wars), the number of Lebanese dreaming of living abroad has not declined. The Lebanese economy is service oriented, with a weak agricultural and industrial sector. This explains the high number of graduates who cannot find suitable jobs in their fields – a problem also seen in the lack of Lebanese labor market guidance offered to students. Combined with the corruption in the public sector and the need to “know someone” in order to attain a job, many of the Lebanese see migration as their best path towards a stable future.

Tripoli, Lebanon – In front of the hotel

The number of Lebanese nationals currently living abroad is around 800,000 – with a diaspora amounting to 14 million in second and third generation descendants – a high number relative to a population of only 4 million. A large percentage of Lebanese rely financially on a family member living abroad; the money that emigrants send back to their families accounts for around 16% of our GDP. For a country whose citizens are known for being proud of belonging to and loving their homeland, these numbers show how alarming the situation has become and how the government fails to implement plans that provide job opportunities to Lebanese and motivate them to stay.

Beirut, Lebanon – Skyline

Another aspect of uncertainty in Lebanon is the perpetual worry that our lives may suddenly fall apart as a result of circumstances that are out of our control. Illness places a huge financial burden on many Lebanese families who do not have health insurance; medical services in Lebanon are expensive and unaffordable for many living in poverty. And facing a car crash is another not-so-rare occurrence: it is difficult to think of someone you know who hasn’t been through one.

Tripoli, Lebanon – On the street

Over the past few years, Beirut has witnessed two incidents of building collapses, resulting in a total of more than 26 deaths. The issue of buildings needing repairs, yet their inhabitants unable to afford them, is a recurring problem in Beirut’s poorer suburbs. The immediate destruction brought on by these incidents paints a clear picture of the lack of security that many of us suffer from.

Beirut, Lebanon – Commenting

Lebanon is classified as a middle-income country—a classification which does not offer much insight into the economic disparities since it does not take into account how the overall income is distributed among the population.3 The latest poverty assessment performed by the UNDP showed that 30% (1.5 million) of the Lebanese population are poor – living on less than four dollars a day. Of those, 300,000 are extremely poor – living on less than two dollars and fifty cents a day and unable to meet their basic food needs.4 On the other hand, 0.3% of the population owns 50% of Lebanon’s wealth, showing how far we have spiraled down the scale of inequality.5

Jounieh, Lebanon – A view

Despite the growing number of people pushed into poverty – a problem made worse by the Syrian refugee crisis – the social services provided by the Lebanese government are still in a primitive stage.6 There is no clear national policy or strategy to help people improve their quality of life or that prevents them from falling deeper into poverty. What has been taking place so far is a set of interventions which usually come in response to a crisis and lack the coordination to achieve an effective, long-lasting goal.

Beirut, Lebanon – Bathing

The current policies only help to keep the poor in a fixed cycle of deprivation they cannot flee. They usually hold jobs of an informal nature, such as ones in agriculture, construction and services (like cleaning, driving and working in shops). These jobs are characterized by their low wages, little to no job security, absence of contracts, and the state of being hired for short or nonconsecutive periods of time. The Syrian refugee crisis added insult to injury, with many of the Syrian refugees going after this type of informal labor, sometimes accepting lower wages than their Lebanese counterparts. This has led to an increase in competition and has pushed more than 200,000 Lebanese out of their jobs, thus causing the poor to be in a perpetual state of uncertainty.7

Tripoli, Lebanon – Bustling

Here in Lebanon, we lack universal healthcare, pension plans for the private sector, long term social security programs, and the list goes on. The available job opportunities cannot accommodate all of Lebanon’s students graduating every year, and many of them end up dreaming of a better future outside of Lebanon. For the poor and middle class in Lebanon, life is never-ending loop of uncertainty and worry. If the government fails to take action soon, the only defining characteristic of our future will be a disaster – and a very certain one.

Ghadir Younes

Footnotes

1. Kadi, Samar. “Lebanon’s youth bearing the brunt of unemployment, regional instability.” The Arab Weekly. August 6, 2017. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: https://thearabweekly.com/lebanons-youth-bearing-brunt-unemployment-regional-instability

2. Kadi, Samar. “Lebanon’s youth bearing the brunt of unemployment, regional instability.” The Arab Weekly. August 6, 2017. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: https://thearabweekly.com/lebanons-youth-bearing-brunt-unemployment-regional-instability

3. Kukrety, Nupur & Jamal, Sarah Al. Poverty, Inequality and Social Protection in Lebanon. Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs. April 2016. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: http://website.aub.edu.lb/ifi/publications/Documents/research_reports/20160426_poverty_inequality.pdf

4. Chadi. “UNDP Latest Poverty Assessment Report: 30% of Lebanese are Poor. Blog Baladi. February 17, 2018. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: http://blogbaladi.com/undp-latest-poverty-assessment-report-30-of-lebanese-are-poor/

5. A Separate State of Mind. “0.3% of Lebanese Own 50% of Lebanon.” February 18, 2015. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: https://stateofmind13.com/2015/02/18/0-3-of-lebanese-own-50-of-lebanon/

6. Kukrety, Nupur & Jamal, Sarah Al. Poverty, Inequality and Social Protection in Lebanon. Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs. April 2016. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: http://website.aub.edu.lb/ifi/publications/Documents/research_reports/20160426_poverty_inequality.pdf

7. The Borgen Project. “Poverty Rate in Lebanon.” August 4, 2017. Retrieved on September 21, 2018: https://borgenproject.org/poverty-rate-in-lebanon/


Credits

Photo 1: Beirut, Lebanon – Reflections – Diego Fiore

Photo 2: Tyre, Lebanon – After the rain – Loes Kieboom

Photo 3: Tripoli, Lebanon – Fruit – Catay

Photo 4: Tripoli, Lebanon – In front of the hotel – Catay

Photo 5: Beirut, Lebanon – Skyline – Diak

Photo 6: Tripoli, Lebanon – On the street – Prdyapim

Photo 7: Beirut, Lebanon – Commenting – Brian Wertheim

Photo 8: Jounieh, Lebanon – A view – Stephanie Crocq

Photo 9: Beirut, Lebanon – Bathing – Bassem Zein

Photo 10: Tripoli, Lebanon – Bustling – Krystel


Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Uberti, Alejandra Baccino. Adventure – Uruguay. September 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Britain, Poland, China, Argentina, Lebanon, India and other parts of the world…

,.
Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Alejandra Baccino Uberti

¿What is it about planning ahead that makes us feel in control? As if nothing could happen outside of our strategically thought-out plan; nothing will make us question everything we always took for granted.

You grow up, you go to school, and if you are lucky you will end up in a job you don´t hate; you find a partner, start una familia… grow old.

Punta del Este, Uruguay – At the park

¿But, what if all this just doesn´t feel quite right? ¿What if, suddenly, it all changes and you are left wondering why this happened to you? We panic. The floor, once so stable, becomes quicksand waiting for a misstep to engulf us whole.

¿Why does the unknown have to be so frightful and negativo? ¿What if, instead, we embraced it as una nueva aventura? ¿Why settle down when you have that little something stirring inside of you, screaming that this life, this plan is just too easy and too dull for you?

Montevideo, Uruguay – Thinking

Finally, you look at your reflection in the mirror and you make una promesa to yourself. You know it won´t be easy and you know that somewhere along the path you will feel pain, you will miss something, you might even regret la decisión. Yet, nonetheless, you forage out into the unknown, with hopes and fears, eagerness and doubts.

Rivadavia, Uruguay – Ignored

Having been born and raised in a third-world country that underwent una enorme crisis económica, uncertainty became a part of my life at an early age. Splurging was out of the question as every peso had to be planned, saved and carefully spent. Your parents had a job and an income until, all of a sudden, they might not anymore. Living at the edge of the abyss while seeing your parents struggle and fearing that the following night your life might change completely, bred una generación of academic over-achievers and people seeking government employment.

Piriapolis, Uruguay – On San Antonio hill

¿What does this mean? Our generación was instilled with la convicción that the more degrees you held, the better your futuro would be. And so we took advantage of free university education and all went and studied for traditional careers. We became accountants, nurses, lawyers y dentistas.

It was too late when we realized that la excelencia académica did not provide any certainty whatsoever regarding the futuro, as the aftermath of the financial crisis kept hitting close to home, with doctors working as taxi drivers and lawyers selling their most precious possessions. The tide shifted then, and the only safe haven became working for the government – a boring, monotonous and unchallenging clerk type of work in the many offices of the many ministerios y agencias of our government. Stamp after stamp, y café tras café, the self-confidence and spirit of self-improvement slowly fading away in exchange for the safety only a civil servant´s job can provide.

Punta del Este. Uruguay – At the bar

As predicted by Ayn Rand, our sociedad started regressing. All those wanting to escape the claws of our dull and corrupt sociedad fled to other countries looking for the excitement and oportunidades they provided.

Over time, la situación financiera improved and stabilized, but even then, that scourge was ingrained so deep within our nature that instead of moving forward we transferred it to different areas. Leaving your job to follow a dream or to travel the world is seen as immature and hippie-like, especially if that job has great health insurance. Not wanting kids is considered selfish and a cause of regret later on in your life. Being suddenly single when you are 30, after ten años in a relationship requires a lot of explaining. ¿And why should I explain myself?

Montevideo, Uruguay – Living

That was el momento when I realized that uncertainty is just a state of mind. Our bagaje cultural y emocional is what makes us scared of it. As certainty is studied in the fields of mathematics, logic and physics; uncertainty is studied from a psychological perspective and the way it affects our emotions and our social behavior. ¿What would happen if we learned to deal with uncertainty the way we deal with certainty, instead of letting it cause so much stress and anxiety? ¿Shouldn´t it be taught as part of the proceso natural of life?

Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay – Hugging

After many tears, when I finally understood that my uncertainty was una circunstancia dinámica instead of una situación estática, I realized that I could finally let out that feeling stirring inside of me, let it take me away and open all the doors available to me. The risks are mine to take, and no one´s to frown upon. As you begin making friends with this uncertainty, you become acquainted with fear, and instead of finding it overwhelm you, it pushes you to be braver than before, to accept that you do not know the future – a liberating and, ultimately, rewarding experience.

Alejandra Baccino Uberti

Credits

Photo 1: Montevideo, Uruguay – Breakwater – DFLC Prints

Photo 2: Punta del Este, Uruguay – At the park – DFLC Prints

Photo 3: Montevideo, Uruguay – Thinking – Mai Rodriguez

Photo 4: Rivadavia, Uruguay – Ignored – Bruno Aguirre

Photo 5: Piriapolis, Uruguay – On San Antonio hill – DFLC Prints

Photo 6: Punta del Este. Uruguay – At the bar – DFLC Prints

Photo 7: Montevideo, Uruguay – Living – DFLC Prints

Photo 8: Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay – Hugging – Don Mammoser

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Fischer, Kristin. Talking about Cancer – Germany. September 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Britain, Poland, China, Argentina, Lebanon, India and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Transposing emblem by Kristin Fischer

The average life expectancy in Europe is about 75 years for men and 81 years for women.1 And if you have had the good fortune to be born in Europe, it usually also means that you will have a good lifestyle with free access to general health care, high levels of education, good job opportunities, and generally very few worries when it comes to covering your basic needs and much more. Living in Europe generally means not having to worry about security, famines, natural disasters, or violent political unrest. And if, against all expectations, any of these things do happen, there is usually a quick response system in place to help all people affected. Disease, too, does not seem to be much of an issue any more. Regular check-ups, vaccinations and a healthy lifestyle usually have you covered. And if something does happen, we have got state-of-the-art treatment to take care of it. Human rights, freedom of conscience, expression and religion are all covered. The worst that could happen is you have a bad spell, but then there are social services to help you pick yourself up again.

Cochem, Germany – The afternoon

So, let’s face it, if you are born in Europe – with very few exceptions – life is something you can pretty much take for granted. Correct? Usually, your biggest worry is going to be your own personal happiness. Have you really lived up to your dreams? Did you find the perfect partner/job/home/etc.?

This is the ground you are standing on. The ground we are all standing on. It is where we have firmly planted our feet and expect to take root in.

Nuremberg, Germany – Hanging out

But what if that ground is suddenly pulled away from underneath you? What if one tiny moment means that your life will never be the same again? What happens then to all those promises of life you grew up believing in? To all those dreams you had? To all the plans you made for your future? What if they were all taken away from you to be placed in the hands of others? To be replaced by uncertainty? Would you not feel angry and betrayed? Would you not think that life is unfair? Most of all, would you not think: “Why me?” and “Why now?” What, if nobody can give you an answer to that?

Berlin, Germany – Skeptical

Imagine finding a small lump somewhere on your body. Maybe while sitting in your garden or on a beach applying sun screen. It seems inauspicious and it is probably harmless but why not take a test. Just to be on the safe side. Going to the doctor is no big deal, and a few tests will surely mean you have got nothing to worry about.

But still, this is the point when uncertainty starts creeping in. It is tiny at first, just a minuscule little niggle at the back of your mind, easily drowned out by other thoughts and distractions. Let’s wait for the results first, you tell yourself and off you go to the cinema or a party or a gathering with friends. The niggle starts up again at night, though, softly but persistently nudging itself back into conscious thought. You cannot sleep so you decide to get up and maybe do a little research online to calm your nerves. It’s probably nothing, you are still thinking. Now, mostly to calm yourself.

Berlin, Germany – Up

You do not like what you find online. Angry with yourself and more worried than ever you slam your computer shut. You will not be sleeping tonight.

Imagine now that you are going to your doctor to find out the results of the test. Imagine him or her looking at you with a grave face. A queasy feeling starts rising up inside your stomach. Your palms start to sweat. You are hoping against hope that they are going to tell you that you are fine. That you have nothing to worry about. That everything is going to be okay. But shouldn’t they be smiling then? Why are they looking so grave? Why aren’t they smiling?

Berlin, Germany – Oberbaumbrücke

And then they say it: “I am afraid it is cancer.” Six words to end your life. You do not even hear the rest of what they are saying. You have already tumbled and fallen. And you keep falling. It turns out the ground you were standing on was not firm at all. It was just a very thin and threadbare rug covering a big black bottomless hole underneath. The hole you are now falling down. How could you not have seen it? Not known of its existence all this time? Your thoughts start spinning. Isn’t cancer supposed to be something that only affects elderly people? Why else would they only start most cancer screenings at the age of 50? You might have heard about someone who had cancer in your vicinity. But they were probably someone’s grandfather or grandmother. And anyway, it really isn’t a subject anyone ever talked about, is it now?

Kempen, Germany – Out for a walk

Slowly, your doctor’s words get through to you. They are very faint and seem to be coming from a long way off. They are talking about further tests and treatment options and life expectancy. But all you can think about is “Why me?”, “Why now?”, “What about my dreams and plans?”, “What about my life?”, and “What do I tell the others?”

Nuremberg, Germany – Reading

Cancer “is the second largest cause of death in the EU-28.”2 Increasingly it affects young people between the ages of 20 and 35, especially women. Yet it is still a taboo subject in many parts of society. This means that on top of having to deal with a potentially life-threatening disease as well as long, drawn-out, and potentially life-changing treatments, people are also feeling excluded from society and sometimes even from their own families because they feel too ashamed to talk about it. It is time to lift the stigma on one of the biggest uncertainties potentially affecting our lives today. Let’s talk about cancer.

Kristin Fischer

End notes / References:

“Average life expectancy in Europe for those born in 2017, by gender and region (in years)”, Statistica.com 2018 https://www.statista.com/statistics/274514/life-expectancy-in-europe/ (02/05/2018)

“Cancer statistics”, Eurostat – statistics explained http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php/Cancer_statistics (02/05/2018)

Credits

Photo 1: Cochem, Germany – The afternoon – Fred Young

Photo 2: Nuremberg, Germany – Hanging out -Tivanova

Photo 3: Berlin, Germany – Skeptical – Frantic

Photo 4: Berlin, Germany – Up – Andreas Kind-1280×720

Photo 5: Berlin, Germany – Oberbaumbrücke – Björn Grochla

Photo 6: Kempen, Germany – Out for a walk – Rieke Photos

Photo 7: Nuremberg, Germany – Reading – Tivanova

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Twenty Plus Years. August 2018.

Cajoto, Christina. The Trajectory of Life – España. August 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Huihao, Mu. Going the Uncertain Way. July 2017.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Protić, Aleksandar. Environmental Uncertainty. August 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sem, Sebastião. Vagrant Poets. September 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. LGBQT – Russia. August 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Uruguay, Britain, Poland, China, Argentina, Lebanon, India and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed