Emblem tranpoзиция by Mu Huihao

I am a senior. Yes, that means that I am going to graduate soon from the place I have studied for four years. A requirement at the school is that I find a company or organization to start my internship and submit a hand-written report. We should all set a clear final goal for our life and aim for it at this moment. That is what the school “encourages.” Unfortunately, I don’t have any specific idea of what I should do in the future and am more reluctant about the compulsory internship than ever before. In part, I don’t like the sense of force, but mainly I don’t know whether I should continue my current freelance work, which does not satisfy the school requirements, or just find a company or organization, like normal seniors do, and figure out what kind of job I should take.

Tianhebei, Guangzhou, China – Crossed
During the last semester at school, I no longer had any classes and stayed at home. Outside my bedroom door, I could hear the hesitant steps of my mother walking back and forth. Afraid to ask about my future plan, she turned to my sister who tried to beat around the bush to decipher my thoughts. Of course, this issue always came up when I visited my grandparents. But they were different, in their straightforward way, my grandfather asked me directly what my plan was for the future and looked at me like a pitiful mouse when he got the reply that I was uncertain. Every reaction showed that I was a poor and idle youth, making me feel like I was useless. 
Nanchang, Jiangxi, China – Jiangxi Provincial Exhibition Center

Can I continue freelancer work on the side just in case? I tried to convey my intention of continuing this home-based work to my family, but all I heard was their strong opposition. My grandfather may have actually been the most open to it. He thought that I could handle both freelance work and a formal job at the same time, which the rest thought was definitely impossible; my sister told me that SoHo (term for small office and home office in China) was a kind of foreign thing, and the market was almost invisible in provincial cities like the one where we live. My mother believed that I should work outside, that I needed to make more new friends to expand my social circle and that I should be social and sophisticated; other family members thought that my current job was so unstable that I even couldn’t feed myself for the uncertain salary and the working time. Most importantly, they all agreed that it is embarrassing if I tell other people I work at home when they ask about the location of my company. They would look down on me, and it could also be a critical factor in finding a good husband to spend the rest of my life with. Obviously, I was frustrated.

Harbin, China – Public square 

However, as the old proverb goes, every cloud has a silver lining. Finally, I was enlightened about the future. It was a cozy afternoon, and I was still at home, searching for a video to enjoy. There was a talk show by a popular comedian who was sharing his experience about how to become a grassroots star. His initial goal was not to become a star, but to join the backstage crew of a program editor. After he saw the salary of one program editor during an internship in the television station, however, he decided to quit the job because, as he joked around, he could not imagine working day and night over the rest of his life for peanuts. A certain destination makes people demoralized and keeps them from moving on, while an uncertain future makes them ambitious and gives them tremendous spirit to fight for their life. Therefore, he took the risk of heading down the road to becoming a star despite his poor appearance. And, he made it.

China – Imagining

Maybe he’s right, I thought. I imagined the scene if I followed my family’s will – finding a company and working in it for about 5 years regardless of the salary, dating somebody and arranging a wedding, having a baby and becoming a full-time housewife forever – what a horrible future! I put a stop to these thoughts in no time and began to figure out the blueprint for freelance. It turned out I had nothing in my brain – I had no idea about this life. However, this kind of uncertainty encouraged me to explore more. I wanted to see what I could do if I fought for it. Yes, at first, I regarded freelance work as a last resort, but now I viewed it as my “uncertain” goal. After I made the decision, I felt myself relax. It was like breathing fresh air – enjoying a lovely breeze after a long time in a sweltering dark room.

Daocheng, Sichuan, China – Downtown

Uncertainty is stimulation. It drives us to uncover the mysterious veil of life, and we will feel satisfied if we achieve something unpredictable. After walking down an uncertain road, we can never know what’s waiting for us and whether the choice is right or not. I don’t know, neither do you. But I am willing to find it, to fight for it and try my best to persuade every member of my family who is against it.

Suzhou, China – Illuminated 

Is SoHo an invisible market in provincial cities like the one where I live? I don’t care. All I know is that the gold will shine if I don’t work outside. Will I have fewer friends to help me in life or work and have a narrower horizon? I am afraid I cannot agree because I believe that friendship is about quality not quantity. Will I not find a good husband? So what. I can live on my own. After all, it is a kind of experience too. Maybe we will regret or rejoice, but it is part of our life. Just keep going – the uncertain way.

Mu Huihao

Credits

Photo 1: China – Fishermen in fog – Godslar

Photo 2: Tianhebei, Guangzhou, China – Crossed – Jake To

Photo 3: Nanchang, Jiangxi, China – Jiangxi Provincial Exhibition Center – gyn

Photo 4: Harbin, China – Public square – Phuong D. Nguyen

Photo 5: China – Imagining – Yiran Ding

Photo 6: Daocheng, Sichuan, China – Downtown – Giftography

Photo 7: Suzhou, China – Illuminated – Ivan Leung

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Julber, Lillian. What Will Tomorrow Bring? – Chile. July 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Russia, Britain, Portugal, Ukraine, Serbia, Germany, India and other parts of the world…

Emblem tranpoзиция by Lillian Julber

Have you ever visited Chile? If you love landscapes, you should! Nowhere else in the world can so many different terrains y climas be found in one country: ice y snow alongside rainy green countryside down south – arid dry deserts up north – not to mention the mountain ranges, which boast some of the highest peaks to be found – sightseeing in this narrow, long strip of a country is espléndido!

Easter Island, Chile – The occident 

I lived there for seven años and still visit it for about fifteen days once a año. But this is not a travel guide, or the diario of a journey; what I want to make you feel is something every chileno feels from el momento they start attending la escuela, and sometimes even earlier. And I do not mean either love for their country – or for their flag – or their national anthem; not even love for “la Rojita,“ their All-Chilean soccer team, which is a passion for most men y women. I mean something else: unstable earth.

Valle de Elqui, Chili – Treeface

If you are a foreigner, you will acquire this feeling very quickly, maybe even more quickly than los locales, because it is new to you. You are unfamiliar with living in a place with the highest seismic activity on the whole planet Earth.

Santiago, Chile – In motion

My first experiencia with this took place on a Sunday in April, at 6:00 a.m., in 2007. I had arrived in Santiago de Chile on March 27, summoned by a language school, in order to teach English to different company managers and supervise the younger EFL teachers who came from English speaking countries. I was staying at a hotel/ hostal next door to the embajada argentina and faced riots two days later, when los chilenos protested the killing of a couple of students during the dictadura militar. There was tear gas on the streets y the subway stations; two “penguins,“ high school students with uniforms, gave me a slice of limón to bite, so I could stop tearing up.

After a couple of weeks, I rented a small furnished apartamento in a nice woman‘s back yard, in a neighborhood elegante y tranquilo, had started regular every-day work, and was enjoying one of my first relaxing weekends, since I had spent the previous ones looking for an apartamento to rent.

Santiago, Chile – The bookstop

It was 6:00 a.m. – I was asleep – and suddenly my bed was practically hopping on the floor, but at that moment I did not actually realize what it was, rolled over on my mattress and went back to sleep. When I finally got up, at about 9:00 a.m., it dawned on me that I had experienced the first little earthquake of my vida.

While I was having breakfast, I turned on the news and learned that el epicentro of the whole thing had been down south, that it had been announced by many very light tremors for a whole fortnight, and that a journalist who had been crossing by boat to an isolated island – together with a rescue crew planning to evacuate las personas living there – and his daughter, whom he had invited on the interesting journey, had been thrown from the boat’s deck. He had been rescued, but his daughter could never be found.

Chile – Cars after the quake

When I went out for a walk, I was reassured that it had not troubled me too much, and all the ancient trees along the streets seemed to continue standing as they had stood for half a century, going through quite a few weak y strong earthquakes; and as there were not many aftershocks in the days that followed, I simply forgot about the whole thing.

Concepcion, Chile – The office building in the aftermath

A few años went by, I had already moved to an unfurnished ground-floor apartamento in a neighborhood más elegante, and had searched for second-hand furniture y antigüedades in order to decorate it, when – in the evening between Friday, February 26 and Saturday, February 27, 2010 – when I had just finished watching a film on my computador – had turned off the TV where a syrupy romantic singer was doing his thing on the stage of the Festival de Viña del Mar – was about to turn off my laptop at around 2:30 a.m. – the electricity suddenly went off and the glass on my floor-to-ceiling windows started to shake.

Valparaiso, Chile – Effects

I thought, “Well, an earthquake,“ and then all hell broke loose, the floor bent more than 45º, and the whole building started to move y shriek, while there was a deep snorting sound which came from the ground; I said aloud to myself “It has been a good 66 years, Lillian,“ curled up on my rug, to use what they call the “triángulo de seguridad“ – an area protected by two big pieces of furniture, so that if a beam or something as heavy as that falls, you can be protected and wait for the whole thing to finish.

Concepcion, Chile – The houses

It lasted more than three minutos, which at that momento seemed like three hours. The janitor nocturno was already banging on my door for me to leave – doors sometimes get stuck during earthquakes, something I did not know at the time – but just looking at the 30 feet between where I was and the door made me afraid.

Then, it stopped; I grabbed all my documentos y my cellphone and went out, and I found everyone who lived in the building already gathered in el vestíbulo or the garden, wearing all kinds of attire such as pijamas, shorts, etc. – most of them had been fast asleep – and it was then that I realized I was just wearing my nightgown.

Valparaiso, Chile – The doors

There was, however, una señora who was fully dressed, even had a warm raincoat on, and was carrying a duffle bag; when I asked her how she had found the time to get dressed and gather everything, she told me that ever since the 1985 earthquake, she had slept with this raincoat hung on a hook next to her apartment’s front door and the bag packed with all her medicamentos y necesidades básicas. Since 1985! This was 2010!

The 2010 earthquake was the second strongest in history, 8.8 en la escala de Richter, only behind the 9.5 one in 1960, also in Chile. Los teléfonos celulares did not work, electricity, water y gas had to be disconnected just in case, even though the blackout lasted for several days; the airport did not operate and when it did start up again, the waiting room was a tent for several months. Many people died in both of these earthquakes and also in the 1985 one, but I survived unscathed, although my apartamento required lots of repairs.

Easter Island, Chile – Facing

Nevertheless, for more than two weeks I slept fully dressed, warned the janitor that I was not going to lock my door, and placed a water bottle between my front door and the frame so that the door stayed ajar. There were hundreds of aftershocks following it, light y strong, for months, and you never knew whether there would be another one as strong as the first.

Easter Island, Chile – The 15 Moai alter of Ahu Tongariki

And this is the way los chilenos live, never knowing whether there will be an earthquake, or if they live near the ocean, whether there will be an earthquake not only en Chile, but somewhere in the Pacific, something that may cause a Tsunami and kill thousands of people. Designated evacuation areas are everywhere – in buildings, factories, streets – and drills are performed all the time. This is life en Chile.

What will tomorrow bring? A chileno never knows.

Lillian Julber

Credits

Photo 1: Chile – Hand of the Desert – Roi Dimor

Photo 2: Easter Island, Chile – The occident – Thomas Griggs

Photo 3: Valle de Elqui, Chili – Treeface – Ferrancf

Photo 4: Santiago, Chile – In motion – Mauro Mora

Photo 5: Santiago, Chile – The bookstop – Laetitia Buscaylet

Photo 6: Chile – Cars after the quake – erlucho

Photo 7: Concepcion, Chile – The office building in the aftermath – Yai

Photo 8: Valparaiso, Chile – Effects – Javier Espuny

Photo 9: Concepcion, Chile – The houses – Yai

Photo 10: Valparaiso, Chile – The doors – Luis Alfonso Orellana

Photo 11: Easter Island, Chile – Facing – Thomas Griggs

Photo 12: Easter Island, Chile – The 15 Moai alter of Ahu Tongariki – RPBaiao

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from China, Russia, Britain, Portugal, Ukraine, Serbia, Germany, India and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Emblem tranpoзиция by Lillian Julber

Have you ever visited Chile? If you love landscapes, you should! Nowhere else in the world can so many different terrains y climas be found in one country: ice y snow alongside rainy green countryside down south – arid dry deserts up north – not to mention the mountain ranges, which boast some of the highest peaks to be found – sightseeing in this narrow, long strip of a country is espléndido!

Easter Island, Chile – The occident 

I lived there for seven años and still visit it for about fifteen days once a año. But this is not a travel guide, or the diario of a journey; what I want to make you feel is something every chileno feels from el momento they start attending la escuela, and sometimes even earlier. And I do not mean either love for their country – or for their flag – or their national anthem; not even love for “la Rojita,“ their All-Chilean soccer team, which is a passion for most men y women. I mean something else: unstable earth.

Valle de Elqui, Chili – Treeface

If you are a foreigner, you will acquire this feeling very quickly, maybe even more quickly than los locales, because it is new to you. You are unfamiliar with living in a place with the highest seismic activity on the whole planet Earth.

Santiago, Chile – In motion

My first experiencia with this took place on a Sunday in April, at 6:00 a.m., in 2007. I had arrived in Santiago de Chile on March 27, summoned by a language school, in order to teach English to different company managers and supervise the younger EFL teachers who came from English speaking countries. I was staying at a hotel/ hostal next door to the embajada argentina and faced riots two days later, when los chilenos protested the killing of a couple of students during the dictadura militar. There was tear gas on the streets y the subway stations; two “penguins,“ high school students with uniforms, gave me a slice of limón to bite, so I could stop tearing up.

After a couple of weeks, I rented a small furnished apartamento in a nice woman‘s back yard, in a neighborhood elegante y tranquilo, had started regular every-day work, and was enjoying one of my first relaxing weekends, since I had spent the previous ones looking for an apartamento to rent.

Santiago, Chile – The bookstop

It was 6:00 a.m. – I was asleep – and suddenly my bed was practically hopping on the floor, but at that moment I did not actually realize what it was, rolled over on my mattress and went back to sleep. When I finally got up, at about 9:00 a.m., it dawned on me that I had experienced the first little earthquake of my vida.

While I was having breakfast, I turned on the news and learned that el epicentro of the whole thing had been down south, that it had been announced by many very light tremors for a whole fortnight, and that a journalist who had been crossing by boat to an isolated island – together with a rescue crew planning to evacuate las personas living there – and his daughter, whom he had invited on the interesting journey, had been thrown from the boat’s deck. He had been rescued, but his daughter could never be found.

Chile – Cars after the quake

When I went out for a walk, I was reassured that it had not troubled me too much, and all the ancient trees along the streets seemed to continue standing as they had stood for half a century, going through quite a few weak y strong earthquakes; and as there were not many aftershocks in the days that followed, I simply forgot about the whole thing.

Concepcion, Chile – The office building in the aftermath

A few años went by, I had already moved to an unfurnished ground-floor apartamento in a neighborhood más elegante, and had searched for second-hand furniture y antigüedades in order to decorate it, when – in the evening between Friday, February 26 and Saturday, February 27, 2010 – when I had just finished watching a film on my computador – had turned off the TV where a syrupy romantic singer was doing his thing on the stage of the Festival de Viña del Mar – was about to turn off my laptop at around 2:30 a.m. – the electricity suddenly went off and the glass on my floor-to-ceiling windows started to shake.

Valparaiso, Chile – Effects

I thought, “Well, an earthquake,“ and then all hell broke loose, the floor bent more than 45º, and the whole building started to move y shriek, while there was a deep snorting sound which came from the ground; I said aloud to myself “It has been a good 66 years, Lillian,“ curled up on my rug, to use what they call the “triángulo de seguridad“ – an area protected by two big pieces of furniture, so that if a beam or something as heavy as that falls, you can be protected and wait for the whole thing to finish.

Concepcion, Chile – The houses

It lasted more than three minutos, which at that momento seemed like three hours. The janitor nocturno was already banging on my door for me to leave – doors sometimes get stuck during earthquakes, something I did not know at the time – but just looking at the 30 feet between where I was and the door made me afraid.

Then, it stopped; I grabbed all my documentos y my cellphone and went out, and I found everyone who lived in the building already gathered in el vestíbulo or the garden, wearing all kinds of attire such as pijamas, shorts, etc. – most of them had been fast asleep – and it was then that I realized I was just wearing my nightgown.

Valparaiso, Chile – The doors

There was, however, una señora who was fully dressed, even had a warm raincoat on, and was carrying a duffle bag; when I asked her how she had found the time to get dressed and gather everything, she told me that ever since the 1985 earthquake, she had slept with this raincoat hung on a hook next to her apartment’s front door and the bag packed with all her medicamentos y necesidades básicas. Since 1985! This was 2010!

The 2010 earthquake was the second strongest in history, 8.8 en la escala de Richter, only behind the 9.5 one in 1960, also in Chile. Los teléfonos celulares did not work, electricity, water y gas had to be disconnected just in case, even though the blackout lasted for several days; the airport did not operate and when it did start up again, the waiting room was a tent for several months. Many people died in both of these earthquakes and also in the 1985 one, but I survived unscathed, although my apartamento required lots of repairs.

Easter Island, Chile – Facing

Nevertheless, for more than two weeks I slept fully dressed, warned the janitor that I was not going to lock my door, and placed a water bottle between my front door and the frame so that the door stayed ajar. There were hundreds of aftershocks following it, light y strong, for months, and you never knew whether there would be another one as strong as the first.

Easter Island, Chile – The 15 Moai alter of Ahu Tongariki

And this is the way los chilenos live, never knowing whether there will be an earthquake, or if they live near the ocean, whether there will be an earthquake not only en Chile, but somewhere in the Pacific, something that may cause a Tsunami and kill thousands of people. Designated evacuation areas are everywhere – in buildings, factories, streets – and drills are performed all the time. This is life en Chile.

What will tomorrow bring? A chileno never knows.

Lillian Julber

Credits

Photo 1: Chile – Hand of the Desert – Roi Dimor

Photo 2: Easter Island, Chile – The occident – Thomas Griggs

Photo 3: Valle de Elqui, Chili – Treeface – Ferrancf

Photo 4: Santiago, Chile – In motion – Mauro Mora

Photo 5: Santiago, Chile – The bookstop – Laetitia Buscaylet

Photo 6: Chile – Cars after the quake – erlucho

Photo 7: Concepcion, Chile – The office building in the aftermath – Yai

Photo 8: Valparaiso, Chile – Effects – Javier Espuny

Photo 9: Concepcion, Chile – The houses – Yai

Photo 10: Valparaiso, Chile – The doors – Luis Alfonso Orellana

Photo 11: Easter Island, Chile – Facing – Thomas Griggs

Photo 12: Easter Island, Chile – The 15 Moai alter of Ahu Tongariki – RPBaiao

Locations

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

Cinemblem: Perypatetik youtube channel


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Awdejuk, Pawel. Niepewność – The Road to Freedom – Poland. July 2018.

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from China, Russia, Britain, Portugal, Ukraine, Serbia, Germany, India and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpoзиция by Pawel Awdejuk

Would you like to be free? I’m pretty sure everyone would. And in most democratic countries people are told they are free. Here, in Poland, we have freedom (or wolność as we call it) and independence written over all the wars we have fought and all the historic changes we went through. But are we really free? And do we even understand what freedom means? And what it entails?

Warsaw, Poland – Monument to the Heroes – difebahia

Being truly free isn’t easy. Some would even say that true wolność is impossible to achieve. But above all, becoming free requires tremendous amounts of responsibility, self discipline and is always connected with uncertainty (known in my home country as niepewność). Being uncertain is basically embroidered in the fabric of freedom. Being free means being fully responsible for one’s life, decisions and choices – and never being certain of what tomorrow will bring. And that’s scary as hell. But is that niepewność, that fear (or strach as it is called in Poland) necessarily bad?

Warsaw, Poland – On the street – Elena Rostunova

You see, strach is essentially just information. An alarm warning you to be careful, because you are out of the safe waters of your comfort zone and “here there may be monsters.” What you do with that fear is entirely up to you. It can be a paralyzing burden, or an amazing source of energy. The most important thing is not to let it overwhelm you. Imagine taking a ride on a horse. It’s a beautiful day, the sun is shining and everything is all right with the world. Suddenly your stallion starts to gallop wildly! Why? It doesn’t matter. What matters is what you do with that situation. You’re now cantering on a barrel of pure energy. Will you take control and make it an awesome, speedy ride? Or will you let it run wherever it wants, risking serious injuries? That’s what your fear and uncertainty are – a crazed horse taking you towards the unknown.

Gdansk, Poland, Street musicians – Kutredrig

And, if left uncontrolled, it can take you to some very dark places. If you let niepewność mutate into strach and later panika you can convince yourself that you will only be safe when others watch you and decide your fate for you. That your every step should be monitored by cameras. Your every call or e-mail needs to be checked by the authorities for dangers. Your children can only be safe if you constantly watch them online on cameras, check their location on GPS and listen to their telephone calls. And that you will never be able to make something of yourself, see places and meet interesting people, because you’re too weak, too dumb and too ugly.

Warsaw, Poland – Eating ice cream – Elena Rostunova

That kind of niepewność can lead you to vote for people feeding on fear and uncertainty, who will convince you that every foreigner is dangerous, every accident was an assassination planned by neighboring countries, and there are killers and terrorists all around you. That kind of strach will leave you chained to your 9-5 job every day and your TV set every evening. Will you be more safe that way? Maybe, maybe not. But you will definitely be less free.

Wroclaw, Poland – In the park – Elenakirey

So what should you do? Walk blindly into any risky situation like a child playing ciuciubabka? Ignoring any uncertainty you feel? Absolutely not. But it’s wise to rein it in. And use it for your benefit. Because fear, when used properly, can become a superpower. When you’re scared, you are faster, stronger, smarter and more focused. Here are some examples: In 2006, in Quebec, a 41-year-old mother fought a fully grown polar bear attacking her son. Yup, she went bare knuckle fighting with a polar bear! And she won, because no matter the species, you never piss off a mother with a child. In 2012, in Virginia, a 22-year-old daughter lifted the BMW, which fell from jacks and pinned her father to the ground. Then she pulled him from under it, performed CPR and saved his life. Never underestimate the power that fear and uncertainty give you. They make you think, motivate you, pull you out of the mundane comfort of everyday life and give you a chance to do great things. If you don’t let them paralyze you.

Cracow, Poland – At the main square – Michal Lesniak

Was Columbus certain where he would end up, when he sailed towards India? Most certainly not. The guy landed on a totally different continent! But it was great! He found something new and exciting. Do you think astronauts are absolutely certain they will come back from their missions safely? They don’t, and tragedies such as Apollo 1 show that they have every right to be uncertain. But they go into space anyway and experience things they never would working a 9-5 desk job.

Cracow, Poland – At the fair – Jeilly

If you try something new, if you strive to get better, more independent, freer, you will never feel certain. No matter whether you want to start you own company, study abroad, climb Mount Everest or hitchhike around Europe, there will always be an element of risk involved and you will never be 100% certain of the outcomes. Because freedom isn’t about certainty, or safety (although you should still try to foresee potential hazards and be ready for them). Freedom is about being your own man (or woman) and seizing good opportunities when they present themselves.

Warsaw, Poland – At the food truck festival – Fotokon

So take a risk and give yourself a chance! Try to publish that book you’ve been keeping in a drawer for years. Ask that girl out. Visit Africa. Go to a job interview. Register your start-up. Sure, maybe you’ll fail. Maybe you’ll get rejected. But, as Jack Nicholson said in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” – at least you tried. Grab the reins of your uncertainty and gallop towards great things.

Pawel Awdejuk

Credits

Photo 1: Krakow, Poland – On the Bernatek footbridge – SCP255

Photo 2: Warsaw, Poland – Monument to the Heroes – difebahia

Photo 3: Warsaw, Poland – On the street – Elena Rostunova

Photo 4: Gdansk, Poland, Street musicians – Kutredrig

Photo 5: Warsaw, Poland – Eating ice cream – Elena Rostunova

Photo 6: Wroclaw, Poland – In the park – Elenakirey

Photo 7: Cracow, Poland – At the main square – Michal Lesniak

Photo 8: Cracow, Poland – At the fair – Jeilly

Photo 9: Warsaw, Poland – At the food truck festival – Fotokon

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Chile, China, Russia, Britain, Portugal, Ukraine, Serbia, Germany, India and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Emblem transpoзиция by Pawel Awdejuk

Would you like to be free? I’m pretty sure everyone would. And in most democratic countries people are told they are free. Here, in Poland, we have freedom (or wolność as we call it) and independence written over all the wars we have fought and all the historic changes we went through. But are we really free? And do we even understand what freedom means? And what it entails?

Warsaw, Poland – Monument to the Heroes – difebahia

Being truly free isn’t easy. Some would even say that true wolność is impossible to achieve. But above all, becoming free requires tremendous amounts of responsibility, self discipline and is always connected with uncertainty (known in my home country as niepewność). Being uncertain is basically embroidered in the fabric of freedom. Being free means being fully responsible for one’s life, decisions and choices – and never being certain of what tomorrow will bring. And that’s scary as hell. But is that niepewność, that fear (or strach as it is called in Poland) necessarily bad?

Warsaw, Poland – On the street – Elena Rostunova

You see, strach is essentially just information. An alarm warning you to be careful, because you are out of the safe waters of your comfort zone and “here there may be monsters.” What you do with that fear is entirely up to you. It can be a paralyzing burden, or an amazing source of energy. The most important thing is not to let it overwhelm you. Imagine taking a ride on a horse. It’s a beautiful day, the sun is shining and everything is all right with the world. Suddenly your stallion starts to gallop wildly! Why? It doesn’t matter. What matters is what you do with that situation. You’re now cantering on a barrel of pure energy. Will you take control and make it an awesome, speedy ride? Or will you let it run wherever it wants, risking serious injuries? That’s what your fear and uncertainty are – a crazed horse taking you towards the unknown.

Gdansk, Poland, Street musicians – Kutredrig

And, if left uncontrolled, it can take you to some very dark places. If you let niepewność mutate into strach and later panika you can convince yourself that you will only be safe when others watch you and decide your fate for you. That your every step should be monitored by cameras. Your every call or e-mail needs to be checked by the authorities for dangers. Your children can only be safe if you constantly watch them online on cameras, check their location on GPS and listen to their telephone calls. And that you will never be able to make something of yourself, see places and meet interesting people, because you’re too weak, too dumb and too ugly.

Warsaw, Poland – Eating ice cream – Elena Rostunova

That kind of niepewność can lead you to vote for people feeding on fear and uncertainty, who will convince you that every foreigner is dangerous, every accident was an assassination planned by neighboring countries, and there are killers and terrorists all around you. That kind of strach will leave you chained to your 9-5 job every day and your TV set every evening. Will you be more safe that way? Maybe, maybe not. But you will definitely be less free.

Wroclaw, Poland – In the park – Elenakirey

So what should you do? Walk blindly into any risky situation like a child playing ciuciubabka? Ignoring any uncertainty you feel? Absolutely not. But it’s wise to rein it in. And use it for your benefit. Because fear, when used properly, can become a superpower. When you’re scared, you are faster, stronger, smarter and more focused. Here are some examples: In 2006, in Quebec, a 41-year-old mother fought a fully grown polar bear attacking her son. Yup, she went bare knuckle fighting with a polar bear! And she won, because no matter the species, you never piss off a mother with a child. In 2012, in Virginia, a 22-year-old daughter lifted the BMW, which fell from jacks and pinned her father to the ground. Then she pulled him from under it, performed CPR and saved his life. Never underestimate the power that fear and uncertainty give you. They make you think, motivate you, pull you out of the mundane comfort of everyday life and give you a chance to do great things. If you don’t let them paralyze you.

Cracow, Poland – At the main square – Michal Lesniak

Was Columbus certain where he would end up, when he sailed towards India? Most certainly not. The guy landed on a totally different continent! But it was great! He found something new and exciting. Do you think astronauts are absolutely certain they will come back from their missions safely? They don’t, and tragedies such as Apollo 1 show that they have every right to be uncertain. But they go into space anyway and experience things they never would working a 9-5 desk job.

Cracow, Poland – At the fair – Jeilly

If you try something new, if you strive to get better, more independent, freer, you will never feel certain. No matter whether you want to start you own company, study abroad, climb Mount Everest or hitchhike around Europe, there will always be an element of risk involved and you will never be 100% certain of the outcomes. Because freedom isn’t about certainty, or safety (although you should still try to foresee potential hazards and be ready for them). Freedom is about being your own man (or woman) and seizing good opportunities when they present themselves.

Warsaw, Poland – At the food truck festival – Fotokon

So take a risk and give yourself a chance! Try to publish that book you’ve been keeping in a drawer for years. Ask that girl out. Visit Africa. Go to a job interview. Register your start-up. Sure, maybe you’ll fail. Maybe you’ll get rejected. But, as Jack Nicholson said in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” – at least you tried. Grab the reins of your uncertainty and gallop towards great things.

Pawel Awdejuk

Credits

Photo 1: Krakow, Poland – On the Bernatek footbridge – SCP255

Photo 2: Warsaw, Poland – Monument to the Heroes – difebahia

Photo 3: Warsaw, Poland – On the street – Elena Rostunova

Photo 4: Gdansk, Poland, Street musicians – Kutredrig

Photo 5: Warsaw, Poland – Eating ice cream – Elena Rostunova

Photo 6: Wroclaw, Poland – In the park – Elenakirey

Photo 7: Cracow, Poland – At the main square – Michal Lesniak

Photo 8: Cracow, Poland – At the fair – Jeilly

Photo 9: Warsaw, Poland – At the food truck festival – Fotokon

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Bell, Sarah. The Bushfire Drive – Australia. July 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Chile, China, Russia, Britain, Portugal, Ukraine, Serbia, Germany, India and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpoзиция by Sarah Bell

I’ve done this drive so many times, I’ve lost count. How many kilometres it is, god I’ve got no idea – we always just talk during the hours of driving. It’s about six I reckon, more or less. I pretty much know every bend, pot-hole, distinctive looking tree, kangaroo hang-out zone, oddity worth pointing out to visitors, pie-shop and public toilet stop. But again, I couldn’t tell you the exact names of the highways, and definitely don’t know their letter-number code, which I know the French and the British are so very keen on.

Australia – The road

The last time I did this drive, it was early autumn, travelling from South to North. From where the emerald lake system meets the sea, up through the tangled temperate rainforests of East Gippsland, crossing the Great Diving Range, onto the pine plantations south of Bombala and then the home landscape of Cooma and my hometown; bleached golden plains ringed by blue-purple hills – Ngunnawal country – the Brindabellas and limestone plains. The sky feels never-ending and I always have to say out loud with a sigh, “Those big skies.” Home country is sheep grazing paddocks mixed with flat orange and grey suburbs and topped with glass shopping malls.

Cooma, Australia – Nanny Goat Hill Lookout

By doing the drive in autumn, what kind of weather you might get is really anyone’s guess. There are big patches of the drive without a single bar of mobile reception, but you’re always on the highway, we would never stray far. This last time, we had no air-conditioning so we were praying for cooler weather. It had been a long, hot and dry summer. Which isn’t so unusual for these parts of Australia but it had been drier than most. Comments, on the need for rain, increased. People not hooked up to the mains found their water tanks were getting low.

Kakadu National Park, Australia – Bushfire

The winds picked up after we’d set off. For those unfamiliar with bushfires and what makes for good – or bad rather – bushfire conditions, it’s heat, sure, but big gusty winds are also necessary for fires. On the outskirts of each town, as you approach, there are road-side fire warning gauges, with colour-coded sections and an arrow. Fire Danger Warning Today, they read. These are colour-coded from cool blues and greens right up to angry bright danger red and black stripes. “Catastrophic” on some, “Code Red” on others.

One by one they crept up from the calm “Low-Moderate.” The wind was getting stronger. The radio began reporting fires in the west of the state; hundreds of kilometres away. But still.

Australia – Out the window

The news at the next top-of-the-clock tells of people losing their homes to fires out west. We have another four hours of driving to go, through some fairly remote country. I’ve driven near bushfires before, had ash fall gently on my windscreen. I’ve witnessed thick, terrifying towers of smoke bigger than any skyscraper. But my travelling companion and partner is from the British Isles where squalls of rain are never far away and water is the most familiar element.

Brindabella Mountains, Australia – At the top

The heat is creeping up, and so is the wind. We stop to have a break from the car; the sweat and the heat, and buy ice-coffees. In Cooma we are surrounded by paddocks that were cleared of nearly all the trees around 150 years ago, and the blonde-shaded sharp grass whips and shakes in the wind. Not far to go now, we are on the well-trodden road from one town to my bigger hometown. We drive north along the plain between the two smudged-green mountain ranges, the Snowy and Brindabella Mountains lie to the west, their familiar curves a symbol of home. Just under two hours to go.

Australia, Bushfire raging

I stay calm when I spot the sooty grey smoke curling up into the brilliant blue sky. The nearby Namadgi National Park has obviously had a fire break out; it was inevitable really. As we drive closer I am able to see that it must be a fair-sized area burning, being fanned westwards by the persistent wind. The dry bush floor and crackling leaves, naturally laden with eucalyptus oil, further encourage the fire. We keep on, foot to the floor in our white hot-box car. I break off a phone call to re-assure my partner that the fire is too far away to be a danger to us, as this would not be apparent to someone unfamiliar with bushfires. I am far from any kind of expert – and more of a city-kid at heart – but growing up surrounded by this country, knowing about bushfires is just something you absorb. I mentally calculate quickly that the fire would need to cross an entire mountain range and cross the plain to get anywhere near the road, and despite this wind, this distance would probably take longer than we will be on the highway for, travelling at 100 kilometres an hour. With sparks likely to be carried ahead of the fire, creating new spot-fires, I am uncertain we will definitely miss this fire, but I use my best-guess, I try to be reassuring and calm. I know what we have both heard on the radio today, I know people have lost their homes to fire today, and I have the fear and respect this element deserves.

Tathra, Australia – The coast

We can smell the distinctive burnt eucalyptus oil of the bushfire in the car as we leave the grey billows in the sky and finally reach our destination safely. I silently thank the heavens once the fire is behind us. Later, on the radio and the television, we hear of a township; on the other side of the mountains to the east, which has burnt to the ground. We hear Tathra lost around 70 homes and a school that day, with embers starting spot fires as far as the eye could see. Many people lost everything.

The car is unpacked, beers are opened, I take a cold shower. “No one was killed though,” we all say about Tathra. “Thank goodness no one was killed.”

Sarah Bell


Credits

Photo 1: Kawana Way, Australia – Bushfire at night – Istimages

Photo 2: Australia – The road – Sarah Bell

Photo 3: Cooma, Australia – Nanny Goat Hill Lookout – Filedimage

Photo 4: Kakadu National Park, Australia – Bushfire – EcoPrint

Photo 5: Australia – Out the window – Sarah Bell

Photo 6: Brindabella Mountains, Australia – At the top – Pasqualina Tiyce

Photo 7: Australia, Bushfire raging – Totajla

Photo 8: Tathra, Australia – The coast – John Carnemolla

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, Portugal, Ukraine, Serbia, Germany, India and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Emblem transpoзиция by Sarah Bell

I’ve done this drive so many times, I’ve lost count. How many kilometres it is, god I’ve got no idea – we always just talk during the hours of driving. It’s about six I reckon, more or less. I pretty much know every bend, pot-hole, distinctive looking tree, kangaroo hang-out zone, oddity worth pointing out to visitors, pie-shop and public toilet stop. But again, I couldn’t tell you the exact names of the highways, and definitely don’t know their letter-number code, which I know the French and the British are so very keen on.

Australia – The road

The last time I did this drive, it was early autumn, travelling from South to North. From where the emerald lake system meets the sea, up through the tangled temperate rainforests of East Gippsland, crossing the Great Diving Range, onto the pine plantations south of Bombala and then the home landscape of Cooma and my hometown; bleached golden plains ringed by blue-purple hills – Ngunnawal country – the Brindabellas and limestone plains. The sky feels never-ending and I always have to say out loud with a sigh, “Those big skies.” Home country is sheep grazing paddocks mixed with flat orange and grey suburbs and topped with glass shopping malls.

Cooma, Australia – Nanny Goat Hill Lookout

By doing the drive in autumn, what kind of weather you might get is really anyone’s guess. There are big patches of the drive without a single bar of mobile reception, but you’re always on the highway, we would never stray far. This last time, we had no air-conditioning so we were praying for cooler weather. It had been a long, hot and dry summer. Which isn’t so unusual for these parts of Australia but it had been drier than most. Comments, on the need for rain, increased. People not hooked up to the mains found their water tanks were getting low.

Kakadu National Park, Australia – Bushfire

The winds picked up after we’d set off. For those unfamiliar with bushfires and what makes for good – or bad rather – bushfire conditions, it’s heat, sure, but big gusty winds are also necessary for fires. On the outskirts of each town, as you approach, there are road-side fire warning gauges, with colour-coded sections and an arrow. Fire Danger Warning Today, they read. These are colour-coded from cool blues and greens right up to angry bright danger red and black stripes. “Catastrophic” on some, “Code Red” on others.

One by one they crept up from the calm “Low-Moderate.” The wind was getting stronger. The radio began reporting fires in the west of the state; hundreds of kilometres away. But still.

Australia – Out the window

The news at the next top-of-the-clock tells of people losing their homes to fires out west. We have another four hours of driving to go, through some fairly remote country. I’ve driven near bushfires before, had ash fall gently on my windscreen. I’ve witnessed thick, terrifying towers of smoke bigger than any skyscraper. But my travelling companion and partner is from the British Isles where squalls of rain are never far away and water is the most familiar element.

Brindabella Mountains, Australia – At the top

The heat is creeping up, and so is the wind. We stop to have a break from the car; the sweat and the heat, and buy ice-coffees. In Cooma we are surrounded by paddocks that were cleared of nearly all the trees around 150 years ago, and the blonde-shaded sharp grass whips and shakes in the wind. Not far to go now, we are on the well-trodden road from one town to my bigger hometown. We drive north along the plain between the two smudged-green mountain ranges, the Snowy and Brindabella Mountains lie to the west, their familiar curves a symbol of home. Just under two hours to go.

Australia, Bushfire raging

I stay calm when I spot the sooty grey smoke curling up into the brilliant blue sky. The nearby Namadgi National Park has obviously had a fire break out; it was inevitable really. As we drive closer I am able to see that it must be a fair-sized area burning, being fanned westwards by the persistent wind. The dry bush floor and crackling leaves, naturally laden with eucalyptus oil, further encourage the fire. We keep on, foot to the floor in our white hot-box car. I break off a phone call to re-assure my partner that the fire is too far away to be a danger to us, as this would not be apparent to someone unfamiliar with bushfires. I am far from any kind of expert – and more of a city-kid at heart – but growing up surrounded by this country, knowing about bushfires is just something you absorb. I mentally calculate quickly that the fire would need to cross an entire mountain range and cross the plain to get anywhere near the road, and despite this wind, this distance would probably take longer than we will be on the highway for, travelling at 100 kilometres an hour. With sparks likely to be carried ahead of the fire, creating new spot-fires, I am uncertain we will definitely miss this fire, but I use my best-guess, I try to be reassuring and calm. I know what we have both heard on the radio today, I know people have lost their homes to fire today, and I have the fear and respect this element deserves.

Tathra, Australia – The coast

We can smell the distinctive burnt eucalyptus oil of the bushfire in the car as we leave the grey billows in the sky and finally reach our destination safely. I silently thank the heavens once the fire is behind us. Later, on the radio and the television, we hear of a township; on the other side of the mountains to the east, which has burnt to the ground. We hear Tathra lost around 70 homes and a school that day, with embers starting spot fires as far as the eye could see. Many people lost everything.

The car is unpacked, beers are opened, I take a cold shower. “No one was killed though,” we all say about Tathra. “Thank goodness no one was killed.”

Sarah Bell


Credits

Photo 1: Kawana Way, Australia – Bushfire at night – Istimages

Photo 2: Australia – The road – Sarah Bell

Photo 3: Cooma, Australia – Nanny Goat Hill Lookout – Filedimage

Photo 4: Kakadu National Park, Australia – Bushfire – EcoPrint

Photo 5: Australia – Out the window – Sarah Bell

Photo 6: Brindabella Mountains, Australia – At the top – Pasqualina Tiyce

Photo 7: Australia, Bushfire raging – Totajla

Photo 8: Tathra, Australia – The coast – John Carnemolla

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Kanunova, Nigina. Metamporphoses in Modern Life. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, Portugal, Ukraine, Serbia, Germany, India and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpозиция by Nigina Kanunova

“A first impression cannot be made twice” – these words came to mind unexpectedly when I thought about the life that I live today. It seems that I have not changed; it seems to me I have not lost the ability to admire the arts and nature, human kindness and love, human decency, poetry and music. I am still open and hospitable to those I love, still ready to help anyone I can; I protest against and categorically reject human cruelty and violence, ignorance and greed…

All of the above indicates that I am a human being in any situation because it is so important not to lose yourself in this whirl. For some reason, more and more often I come back to my native city. I remember a lot from that life, a lot … There was everything in it: a joyful thrill and agonizing grief, loss and hope … But the amazing thing is that everything was clear enough for me in that life.

Khorog, Tajikistan – Together – Nowak Lukasz

It was a life filled with coziness and kindness: I was a little girl and lived in a warm sunny city, green and touching in its cordiality, which was noted by many of those who visited it.

In the reality of the present day, my native city is almost “uprooted” beyond recognition… but not from my memories and heart.

When demolishing old buildings, such as museums and theatres, when we cut the old trees, instead of preserving them and thinking of our health, we demolish our historical and cultural values, we destroy our life and that of future generations.

Khorog, Tajikistan – Alone – Michal Knitl

Construction is probably one of the most profitable businesses, but as the Native American saying goes: “When the last tree has been cut down, the last fish caught, the last river poisoned, only then will we realize that one cannot eat money.” From a business point of view, don’t we need a sense of permanency? Isn’t it important from a commercial perspective?

I have been watching the picture of uncertainty in our life every day, some kind of incomprehensible and brutal disarray, when people in search of work leave their native places, when children do not study for knowledge, when those who teach often do not meet the requirements for a school or university, when the teachers are being paid a pittance. When parents face the dilemma of what to spend money on: the child? food? apartment costs? education? medical services?

If we are so rich to destroy our history and culture, probably we have enough resources for strengthening the health and education sectors?

Ishkoshim, Tajikistan – Preparing meal – Michal Knitl

We say, free medicine and education, but it is only in words, not in deeds. Therefore, it turns out that people live as they can. Somewhere I read that: “The best thing you can do for people is to teach them to help themselves.” I see that people are gradually beginning to live by these words: No one has taught them, and life itself has made them take care of themselves.

I flip through my everyday life: past and present, and I see how much we have lost and how much we have found today. Simply a transitional stage, which is a very complex phenomenon where we continue to select, choose, reject and be aware of something necessary and positive from our past life. I see a change in loved ones, in neighbors, in strangers. It is a change in everything – in views on the usual things, necessities of life, attitudes toward each other.

Khorog, Tajikistan – On the road – Michal Knitl

I can see the formation of a new society, which is more pragmatic and often cold and indifferent to each other. I see other faces, new faces, and I have something to compare them with because I remember the people who once lived in my city. I remember them because of the quality of their memory or because we had different values in life: They had a different perception of the world around them; they taught me to respect our history and roots.

We are often resistant to change because we cannot know what change can bring us. Some changes bring new opportunities and open up new vistas, but other changes bring pain and disappointment.

How I wish the first impression of us were positive and forever. In order to rule out all inconsistencies and problems, all the uncertainties and instability. How I wish people would learn to smile with all their heart; how I wish we could be kinder to each other; appreciate each other and everything that surrounds us; how I wish we could learn to respect Earth and our nature.

Khujand, Tajikistan – Embroidering together – Nickolay Vinokurov

How I hope people will cherish and appreciate the time we give to each other… the time that is impossible to get back or stop; how I hope we can understand that the true happiness of life is in love. The love of our beloved ones and friends, those who passed away, those who struggled for world peace. Love is respect for history no matter whether we like or accept it.

I love reading; one of the best books that is always in my mind is The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint Exupery. It is a must read for everybody, I am convinced of it. This fabulous book teaches us to love the journey of life.

“For me you are only a little boy just like a hundred thousand other little boys. And I have no need of you. And you have no need of me, either. For you I’m only a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But if you tame me we’ll need each other. You’ll be the only boy in the world for me and I’ll be the only fox in the world for you.”

Karakul, Tajikistan – Having fun – Milosz Maslanka

Think, happiness is a moment that you cannot catch. If you look carefully, we unfortunately do not pay attention to many special moments. Happiness consists in kindheartedness, responsiveness, and understanding the value of human life.

To my mind, true happiness is within us; it comes from small things. But in the pursuit of material benefits, we forget to live. We are on planet Earth to live, so let us live! Happiness is in the smell of rain and the sounds of water; it comes from autumn colors and reading books; it comes from tasty food and beautiful music or movies, but what is most important, it comes from people. If you are lucky to find true love, this is a miracle; cherish, enjoy moments with people you love.

Murghab, Tajikistan – Into town – Nowak Lukasz

In conclusion, I would like to cite a quote from Eleanor Roosevelt: “The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”

Life is a journey, but this journey is too short and you never know what is going to happen tomorrow. You cannot change people you meet; you cannot peddle your ideas or vision of the universe. Sometimes disappointment in people can drain your soul, steal your heart; often social burdens drive us crazy, but do not give up, stop for a while and think about who you are: What is your true destination? What is your purpose? What is your dream? If you are able to answer all those questions, you will be better off. Follow your dream!

Nigina Kanunova

Credits

Photo 1: Bulunkul, Tajikistan – In the valley – Nowak Lukasz

Photo 2: Khorog, Tajikistan – Together – Nowak Lukasz

Photo 3: Khorog, Tajikistan – Alone – Michal Knitl

Photo 4: Ishkoshim, Tajikistan – Preparing meal – Michal Knitl

Photo 5: Khorog, Tajikistan – On the road – Michal Knitl

Photo 6: Khujand, Tajikistan – Embroidering together – Nickolay Vinokurov

Photo 7: Karakul, Tajikistan – Having fun – Milosz Maslanka

Photo 8: Murghab, Tajikistan – Into town – Nowak Lukasz

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Australia, Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Source: The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Emblem transpозиция by Nigina Kanunova

“A first impression cannot be made twice” – these words came to mind unexpectedly when I thought about the life that I live today. It seems that I have not changed; it seems to me I have not lost the ability to admire the arts and nature, human kindness and love, human decency, poetry and music. I am still open and hospitable to those I love, still ready to help anyone I can; I protest against and categorically reject human cruelty and violence, ignorance and greed…

All of the above indicates that I am a human being in any situation because it is so important not to lose yourself in this whirl. For some reason, more and more often I come back to my native city. I remember a lot from that life, a lot … There was everything in it: a joyful thrill and agonizing grief, loss and hope … But the amazing thing is that everything was clear enough for me in that life.

Khorog, Tajikistan – Together – Nowak Lukasz

It was a life filled with coziness and kindness: I was a little girl and lived in a warm sunny city, green and touching in its cordiality, which was noted by many of those who visited it.

In the reality of the present day, my native city is almost “uprooted” beyond recognition… but not from my memories and heart.

When demolishing old buildings, such as museums and theatres, when we cut the old trees, instead of preserving them and thinking of our health, we demolish our historical and cultural values, we destroy our life and that of future generations.

Khorog, Tajikistan – Alone – Michal Knitl

Construction is probably one of the most profitable businesses, but as the Native American saying goes: “When the last tree has been cut down, the last fish caught, the last river poisoned, only then will we realize that one cannot eat money.” From a business point of view, don’t we need a sense of permanency? Isn’t it important from a commercial perspective?

I have been watching the picture of uncertainty in our life every day, some kind of incomprehensible and brutal disarray, when people in search of work leave their native places, when children do not study for knowledge, when those who teach often do not meet the requirements for a school or university, when the teachers are being paid a pittance. When parents face the dilemma of what to spend money on: the child? food? apartment costs? education? medical services?

If we are so rich to destroy our history and culture, probably we have enough resources for strengthening the health and education sectors?

Ishkoshim, Tajikistan – Preparing meal – Michal Knitl

We say, free medicine and education, but it is only in words, not in deeds. Therefore, it turns out that people live as they can. Somewhere I read that: “The best thing you can do for people is to teach them to help themselves.” I see that people are gradually beginning to live by these words: No one has taught them, and life itself has made them take care of themselves.

I flip through my everyday life: past and present, and I see how much we have lost and how much we have found today. Simply a transitional stage, which is a very complex phenomenon where we continue to select, choose, reject and be aware of something necessary and positive from our past life. I see a change in loved ones, in neighbors, in strangers. It is a change in everything – in views on the usual things, necessities of life, attitudes toward each other.

Khorog, Tajikistan – On the road – Michal Knitl

I can see the formation of a new society, which is more pragmatic and often cold and indifferent to each other. I see other faces, new faces, and I have something to compare them with because I remember the people who once lived in my city. I remember them because of the quality of their memory or because we had different values in life: They had a different perception of the world around them; they taught me to respect our history and roots.

We are often resistant to change because we cannot know what change can bring us. Some changes bring new opportunities and open up new vistas, but other changes bring pain and disappointment.

How I wish the first impression of us were positive and forever. In order to rule out all inconsistencies and problems, all the uncertainties and instability. How I wish people would learn to smile with all their heart; how I wish we could be kinder to each other; appreciate each other and everything that surrounds us; how I wish we could learn to respect Earth and our nature.

Khujand, Tajikistan – Embroidering together – Nickolay Vinokurov

How I hope people will cherish and appreciate the time we give to each other… the time that is impossible to get back or stop; how I hope we can understand that the true happiness of life is in love. The love of our beloved ones and friends, those who passed away, those who struggled for world peace. Love is respect for history no matter whether we like or accept it.

I love reading; one of the best books that is always in my mind is The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint Exupery. It is a must read for everybody, I am convinced of it. This fabulous book teaches us to love the journey of life.

“For me you are only a little boy just like a hundred thousand other little boys. And I have no need of you. And you have no need of me, either. For you I’m only a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But if you tame me we’ll need each other. You’ll be the only boy in the world for me and I’ll be the only fox in the world for you.”

Karakul, Tajikistan – Having fun – Milosz Maslanka

Think, happiness is a moment that you cannot catch. If you look carefully, we unfortunately do not pay attention to many special moments. Happiness consists in kindheartedness, responsiveness, and understanding the value of human life.

To my mind, true happiness is within us; it comes from small things. But in the pursuit of material benefits, we forget to live. We are on planet Earth to live, so let us live! Happiness is in the smell of rain and the sounds of water; it comes from autumn colors and reading books; it comes from tasty food and beautiful music or movies, but what is most important, it comes from people. If you are lucky to find true love, this is a miracle; cherish, enjoy moments with people you love.

Murghab, Tajikistan – Into town – Nowak Lukasz

In conclusion, I would like to cite a quote from Eleanor Roosevelt: “The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.”

Life is a journey, but this journey is too short and you never know what is going to happen tomorrow. You cannot change people you meet; you cannot peddle your ideas or vision of the universe. Sometimes disappointment in people can drain your soul, steal your heart; often social burdens drive us crazy, but do not give up, stop for a while and think about who you are: What is your true destination? What is your purpose? What is your dream? If you are able to answer all those questions, you will be better off. Follow your dream!

Nigina Kanunova

Credits

Photo 1: Bulunkul, Tajikistan – In the valley – Nowak Lukasz

Photo 2: Khorog, Tajikistan – Together – Nowak Lukasz

Photo 3: Khorog, Tajikistan – Alone – Michal Knitl

Photo 4: Ishkoshim, Tajikistan – Preparing meal – Michal Knitl

Photo 5: Khorog, Tajikistan – On the road – Michal Knitl

Photo 6: Khujand, Tajikistan – Embroidering together – Nickolay Vinokurov

Photo 7: Karakul, Tajikistan – Having fun – Milosz Maslanka

Photo 8: Murghab, Tajikistan – Into town – Nowak Lukasz

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Guillot, Iuliana. Preparing for Change – Romania. June 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Australia, Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpозиция by Iuliana Guillot

When looking back on my childhood, one of the fîrst things that comes to mind, before the people, places or things I used to do, is ă warm, enveloping sunlight. Long, sunny ăfternoon dăys when everything seemed to be still and the whole world disappeared in a swîrl of joy. When all the noise and voices melted in the golden particles of an all-embracing light – when happiness was an everlasting stăte interrupted only occaşionally by şhort quarrels with my playmătes or minor acts of disobedience in an attempt to defy my parents. Happiness was a pure, everlasting stăte; everything was there when I needed it; and planning was the least of my worries. It simply didn‘t exist – either as a word or ă concept. It was my parents’ job to provide for everything that I needed, and it was only when I became a parent myself that I realized how planning was going to be part of my life from then on – as nothing could be left to chance when it came to my offspring.

Cluj-Napoca, Romania – Relaxing

Life has its own way of teaching us what school doesn‘t, and happiness gets to be perceived not as ă given state but as ă fortunate convergence of various factors at ă given time – an intricate construction that becomes harder to achieve as its scope grows larger – something too often ruined by anxiety. This is the very best friend of incertitudine (uncertainty), which – once settling in – changes everything, eroding our good night’s sleep with its obsessive presence and preventing us from seeing the golden particles that used to lighten up our dăys.

Sighisoara, Romania – To the citadel

Incertitudine has become one of the măjor diseases of our century, and many ă time our happiness seems to depend on it. We don’t feel secure, either finăncially or emotionălly as long as we ăre uncertain. This măy relăte to our partner’s feelings or commitment, decisions by our boss, the ability to rely on ă trusted friend in times of need, our own selves when everything is chănging ăround ănd in us. When this last case unfolds, we watch in front of the mîrror – trying to catch glimpses of the new self that rises to the surface – as we realize thăt we ăre ăcting differently in familiăr situations. Our body chănges, ănd this is something we expect ăs we hăve been socially trained to expect it. But our inner self chănges ăs well ănd – ăs surprising ăs it măy seem – it is exactly the opposite of what we expect from the others. From the government, from institutions, from our work envîronment, from our dear ones.

Brasov, Romania – Feeding pigeons

Still, certainty is the one thing no one căn guărăntee. We căn opt for inşurănce policies to protect our goods, we căn try to steal promises from the ones we love, hoping theîr feelings will stăy the săme, but nothing is for sure. There ăre times when săfety seems to have been achieved: ă new government is elected, mărriage vows ăre măde, wills ăre read… but – ăs with most legăl deeds – there ăre legăl procedures to void theîr effect, ănd our humăn nature hăs its way of disrupting things ănd introducing new stătes ănd rules.

Bucharest, Romania – Celebrating Eid al-Fitr

Incertitudine is the one thing thăt sets in ălong with the fîrst signs thăt our comfortăble situation – be it ă solid mărriage, thriving business, or commitment to peace – is chănging. Năturălly enough, we will try to deny the symptoms ănd go on with our uşual behăviour but once we ăre there, incertitudine căn only gain in măgnitude. And it is the worst of ăll possible things for those of us who hăve everything plănned ănd under control in ăn ăttempt to secure hăppiness.

Cluj-Napoca, Romania – Caught

But whăt if uncertainty were the herăld of hope? When hăppy ăbout our situătion, we resist chănge; we do not wănt it; we fear it. But whăt if chănge were beneficial? And whăt if – for those in ă băd situation – uncertainty could be the beginning of ă new stăge? A better one, ăs nothing could be worse thăn the one they ăre ălready in? So everything depends on the very stăge of our life we find ourselves in: if hăppy ănd content, we will resist chănge because ăny chănge is uncertainty; it is fear of the unknown, it is fear of the future, ănd even fear of ourselves. We know ourselves; we know how we react in fămiliar situations, but we cănnot know how we will react in different ones.

Ploiestiori, Romania – In the river – Gabriel Petrescu

When ăn oppressive government is stărting to weaken, when its once unstoppăble ăpproach is starting to fail, the oppressors’ incertitudine becomes the reason for the joy of the oppressed ones, so the outlook chănges depending on the person’s perspective. In our civilized world where everything seems to be black ănd white or cătegorized in some wăy, uncertainty şhould be cătegorized ăs well. The Cambridge dictionăry săys thăt incertitudine is ă “situation in which something is not known, or [it is] something that is not known or certain,” ănd – ăccording to the Psychology Dictionăry – it is the “absence of confidence or conciseness in one’s ideas, judgments, or aims.” Attempts to define it have therefore been măde, but ăs it touches so măny categories – people, institutions, phenomena – it embrăces so măny forms thăt it would be difficult to confine it to ă simple explănătion or definition.

Constanta, Romania – At the seafront

Incertitudine is the test of life nobody căn escăpe from. The more we ăccept it, the more rapidly we will find solutions for făcing it or turning it into an ădvăntăge. So let us not forget thăt chănge căn be beneficial, ănd incertitudine is the first stăte letting us know thăt we should be prepăring for it.

Iuliana Guillot

Credits

Photo 1: Lake Balea, Romania – Ice hotel – Project-Photo

Photo 2: Cluj-Napoca, Romania – Relaxing – Melis

Photo 3: Sighisoara, Romania – To the citadel – Photoserbia

Photo 4: Brasov, Romania – Feeding pigeons – Svarshik

Photo 5: Bucharest, Romania – Celebrating Eid al-Fitr – Gabriel Petrescu

Photo 6: Cluj-Napoca, Romania – Caught – Melis

Photo 7: Ploiestiori, Romania – In the river – Gabriel Petrescu

Photo 8: Constanta, Romania – At the seafront – Photoserbia

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Tajikistan, Australia, Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, and other parts of the world…