Emblem transpозиция by Iuliana Guillot

When looking back on my childhood, one of the fîrst things that comes to mind, before the people, places or things I used to do, is ă warm, enveloping sunlight. Long, sunny ăfternoon dăys when everything seemed to be still and the whole world disappeared in a swîrl of joy. When all the noise and voices melted in the golden particles of an all-embracing light – when happiness was an everlasting stăte interrupted only occaşionally by şhort quarrels with my playmătes or minor acts of disobedience in an attempt to defy my parents. Happiness was a pure, everlasting stăte; everything was there when I needed it; and planning was the least of my worries. It simply didn‘t exist – either as a word or ă concept. It was my parents’ job to provide for everything that I needed, and it was only when I became a parent myself that I realized how planning was going to be part of my life from then on – as nothing could be left to chance when it came to my offspring.

Cluj-Napoca, Romania – Relaxing

Life has its own way of teaching us what school doesn‘t, and happiness gets to be perceived not as ă given state but as ă fortunate convergence of various factors at ă given time – an intricate construction that becomes harder to achieve as its scope grows larger – something too often ruined by anxiety. This is the very best friend of incertitudine (uncertainty), which – once settling in – changes everything, eroding our good night’s sleep with its obsessive presence and preventing us from seeing the golden particles that used to lighten up our dăys.

Sighisoara, Romania – To the citadel

Incertitudine has become one of the măjor diseases of our century, and many ă time our happiness seems to depend on it. We don’t feel secure, either finăncially or emotionălly as long as we ăre uncertain. This măy relăte to our partner’s feelings or commitment, decisions by our boss, the ability to rely on ă trusted friend in times of need, our own selves when everything is chănging ăround ănd in us. When this last case unfolds, we watch in front of the mîrror – trying to catch glimpses of the new self that rises to the surface – as we realize thăt we ăre ăcting differently in familiăr situations. Our body chănges, ănd this is something we expect ăs we hăve been socially trained to expect it. But our inner self chănges ăs well ănd – ăs surprising ăs it măy seem – it is exactly the opposite of what we expect from the others. From the government, from institutions, from our work envîronment, from our dear ones.

Brasov, Romania – Feeding pigeons

Still, certainty is the one thing no one căn guărăntee. We căn opt for inşurănce policies to protect our goods, we căn try to steal promises from the ones we love, hoping theîr feelings will stăy the săme, but nothing is for sure. There ăre times when săfety seems to have been achieved: ă new government is elected, mărriage vows ăre măde, wills ăre read… but – ăs with most legăl deeds – there ăre legăl procedures to void theîr effect, ănd our humăn nature hăs its way of disrupting things ănd introducing new stătes ănd rules.

Bucharest, Romania – Celebrating Eid al-Fitr

Incertitudine is the one thing thăt sets in ălong with the fîrst signs thăt our comfortăble situation – be it ă solid mărriage, thriving business, or commitment to peace – is chănging. Năturălly enough, we will try to deny the symptoms ănd go on with our uşual behăviour but once we ăre there, incertitudine căn only gain in măgnitude. And it is the worst of ăll possible things for those of us who hăve everything plănned ănd under control in ăn ăttempt to secure hăppiness.

Cluj-Napoca, Romania – Caught

But whăt if uncertainty were the herăld of hope? When hăppy ăbout our situătion, we resist chănge; we do not wănt it; we fear it. But whăt if chănge were beneficial? And whăt if – for those in ă băd situation – uncertainty could be the beginning of ă new stăge? A better one, ăs nothing could be worse thăn the one they ăre ălready in? So everything depends on the very stăge of our life we find ourselves in: if hăppy ănd content, we will resist chănge because ăny chănge is uncertainty; it is fear of the unknown, it is fear of the future, ănd even fear of ourselves. We know ourselves; we know how we react in fămiliar situations, but we cănnot know how we will react in different ones.

Ploiestiori, Romania – In the river – Gabriel Petrescu

When ăn oppressive government is stărting to weaken, when its once unstoppăble ăpproach is starting to fail, the oppressors’ incertitudine becomes the reason for the joy of the oppressed ones, so the outlook chănges depending on the person’s perspective. In our civilized world where everything seems to be black ănd white or cătegorized in some wăy, uncertainty şhould be cătegorized ăs well. The Cambridge dictionăry săys thăt incertitudine is ă “situation in which something is not known, or [it is] something that is not known or certain,” ănd – ăccording to the Psychology Dictionăry – it is the “absence of confidence or conciseness in one’s ideas, judgments, or aims.” Attempts to define it have therefore been măde, but ăs it touches so măny categories – people, institutions, phenomena – it embrăces so măny forms thăt it would be difficult to confine it to ă simple explănătion or definition.

Constanta, Romania – At the seafront

Incertitudine is the test of life nobody căn escăpe from. The more we ăccept it, the more rapidly we will find solutions for făcing it or turning it into an ădvăntăge. So let us not forget thăt chănge căn be beneficial, ănd incertitudine is the first stăte letting us know thăt we should be prepăring for it.

Iuliana Guillot

Credits

Photo 1: Lake Balea, Romania – Ice hotel – Project-Photo

Photo 2: Cluj-Napoca, Romania – Relaxing – Melis

Photo 3: Sighisoara, Romania – To the citadel – Photoserbia

Photo 4: Brasov, Romania – Feeding pigeons – Svarshik

Photo 5: Bucharest, Romania – Celebrating Eid al-Fitr – Gabriel Petrescu

Photo 6: Cluj-Napoca, Romania – Caught – Melis

Photo 7: Ploiestiori, Romania – In the river – Gabriel Petrescu

Photo 8: Constanta, Romania – At the seafront – Photoserbia

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Sanmartín, Virginia. Qué Será, Será – Spain. June 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Tajikistan, Australia, Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpoзиция by Virginia Sanmartín

It is amazing what a mere prefix can bring about: able or unable, breakable or unbreakable, certain or uncertain. It can cause a 180 degree turn. It can completely change nuestras vidas. On most ocasiones, we cannot erase this prefix. But sometimes we can choose how we want to face it and how it affects us.

Castellon, Spain – The sun

Every night, we go to bed and set our alarm clock. ¿Will it ring? Or not. ¿What if las baterías run out and we are late to work? We signed an agreement. We will earn a fixed salary monthly. ¿Will we be able to pay our mortgage? Maybe not. ¿What if the company goes bankrupt or decides to fire us? Next Sunday we are going to the beach: amigos, laughs, un gran picnic… ¿Will the weather be nice? Maybe not. ¿What if there is a red flag and we cannot go for a dip? We stayed up all night and did our best on that project. ¿Will it meet everyone’s approval? Maybe not. ¿What if we have to start all over again?

Parasol, Spain – Far out

These situaciones and thoughts are just a few examples from our daily lives. We have the need to lean on certainty as a walking stick that will accompany us on our path. We can be bound or sure or even positivos that something is going to happen. However, there is always a little doubt, a tiny percentage, una posibilidad that it is not. And those instances of “maybe not” and “what if” are precisely what get us to think something will go wrong. Incertidumbre (uncertainty) causes anxiety, stress, worry, unease… Possible rain on your wedding day or getting guests’ congratulations on your menu may seem to be silly cases, although they are very important for many people. ¿But what about a response to therapy or having enough water to supply a town or accepting los resultados of a presidential election? Whatever the case may be, the main thing is: don’t allow incertidumbre to become pesadumbre (grief). La solución is in our hands.

Malaga, Spain – Pompidou center

Just ignore the “un” and focus on the other side. Try to change a “no” to a “yes.” ¿Will it work? Maybe yes. ¿Are you still thinking about this tiny percentage of probabilidad? Well, let’s find a plan B. Obviously, we can’t be sure that this plan B will work either; it might not represent that walking stick we need. However, we could see things in a different way. We could make incertidumbre become hope instead of fear.

Madrid, Spain – Sunset on Cervantes

Lo único seguro en esta vida es la muerte (Just death is certain in our lives). That is a well-known saying en España. Despite the fact that it means we are surrounded by incertidumbre, it is used to encourage people: I would buy a lottery ticket but I won’t win; I would send my CV but I won’t get the position; I want political change but my vote won’t change anything. Don’t be in doubt! Buy it; your ticket can win! Send it; there is una posibilidad you’ll get the job! Vote; it can make a difference! Incertidumbre about what will happen is as frustrating as incertidumbre about what would have happened.

Most people, adopting la posición of reincarnation in Descartes, try to convince us to think something is totally true. If we are not sure about something, ¿how can they be? Someone is innocent until proven guilty because of reasonable doubt.

Madrid, Spain – The Temple of Debod

Incertidumbre experienced by most scientists and inventors and researchers has led to great developments. We wouldn’t have had the light bulb or new drugs if doubt had restrained them from trying. I am quite sure that most politicians consider defeat, but it doesn’t stop them from carrying out their plans to improve. Likewise, evolution is defined by la ignorancia of the future: Millennium Development Goals won’t be reached if incertidumbre prevents los políticos y actores from acting despite the possibility of failure.

Terrassa, Spain – Masia Freixa

Considering incertidumbre as an adventure or challenge gives us la oportunidad to transform stress into enjoyment. Incertidumbre about what will happen next must lead us to live and enjoy everything and every day as the last and the best one, trying and accepting everything that may come. ¿Would you watch a football match if you knew the result? ¿Would you read a thriller if you knew who the killer is? And we can also gain strength. We can be ready for what may come. A close friend of mine suffers chronic pain. There are good and bad days. She goes to bed every night uncertain as to whether or not she will feel pain the next day. Maybe not. Great! Maybe yes. ¿What if the pain only lasts until the afternoon?

Nerja, Spain – The Caves of Nerja

I had la oportunidad to write about incertidumbre. Apart from personal insecurities, I was not sure if mi texto would be selected and if it was, I was not sure if I would be able to do it well or meet las expectativas. I was about to not do it. I didn’t know if I would be able to express what I wanted to say, if people would read it, if they would like it or think it is complete nonsense… But finally, it didn’t prevent me from trying, despite everything.

Most of us live in Doris Day’s eternal question: ¿qué será, será? And it has no answer; or rather, it doesn’t have just one answer. ¿That’s so exciting! Isn’t it? Always feeling these butterflies in your stomach…

Virginia Sanmartín

Credits

Photo 1: Castellon, Spain – The fountain – Joan Bautista

Photo 2: Castellon, Spain – The sun – Joan Bautista

Photo 3: Parasol, Spain – Far out – mne

Photo 4: Malaga, Spain – Pompidou centre – Curioso Travel Photography

Photo 5: Madrid, Spain – Sunset on Cervantes – stoya

Photo 6: Madrid, Spain – The Temple of Debod – stoya

Photo 7: Terrassa, Spain – Masia Freixa – nito

Photo 8: Nerja, Spain – The Caves of Nerja – Grisha Bruev

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sekulić, Jelena. Nesigurnost of the Past, Present and Future – Serbia. June 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Romania, Tajikistan, Australia, Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emblem tranpoзиция by Jelena Sekulić

Human desire to explain and define the world around us has been pushing us to learn and explore since the beginning of time. This urge to understand our surroundings could originate from our need to be certain (sigurni) or our need to escape from the feeling of uneasiness created by nesigurnost (uncertainty).

We learn from other people, our parents, teachers, relatives, neighbors, and if we define knowledge as knowing something for certain, knowing the facts, then all our certainties are based on the conclusions of others. If you take into account that it is a part of human nature to make mistakes, how certain can you be of anything?

Belgrade, Serbia – Saint Sava Temple

We can only hope that historians did their job properly and that our ideas and feelings derived from their “facts” are not fake. For centuries, we believed that Vuk Branković was the one who betrayed the Serbian army in the Battle of Kosovo (Бој на Косову) in 1389, that he left the battlefield, that he was the traitor responsible for the defeat of Serbian army in the battle against the Turks. For five hundred years, the name of Vuk Branković was used as a synonym for betrayal in folk songs, poems and stories, even though this Serbian nobleman continued to resist Turkish attacks until his death in 1397 in a Turkish prison. Something was believed to be true, to be a fact, to be sigurno for five hundred years. It became deeply rooted in the consciousness of Serbian people and, in a way, formed a link in our DNA responsible for generating the belief that this man is the embodiment of all human corruption. However, the latest historical findings say that this accusation (or this verdict) should be questioned, that the feeling of scorn could have been wrongfully provoked. Historical facts, or at least their interpretation, can often be uncertain (nesigurne).

Belgrade, Serbia – Wedding Race

Can we then be certain that our present is clear and properly defined? Our understanding of our present state is directly correlated to our present level of consciousness. If the image of reality is painted in only those colors familiar to us, then we can only talk about our perception of reality, which means that there is only nesigurnost disguised as belief. Nesigurnost of the present is felt on an everyday basis in the privacy of our homes. People living in cities feel the nesigurnost of finding a job (not to mention how difficult it is to find a good job), the nesigurnost of keeping the one they succeed in finding, the nesigurnost of paying off the loans taken from banks with interest specially designed for Serbia (an area of high financial risk).

Belo Blato, Vojvodina, Serbia – Fun 

Those who live in villages (Serbia has the most beautiful villages in the world) feel the nesigurnost of weather conditions, the nesigurnost of the price that their products are going to get at the market, the nesigurnost of how much the state is going to protect their interests. Serbian villages are rapidly disappearing with the progress of the modern world (there are 50 completely empty, uninhabited, ghost villages in Serbia). It means that people are moving into towns, exchanging the type of nesigurnost they are familiar with for another type, equally suffocating but at least different from what they are used to.

Brezovica, Serbia – Milking

This nesigurnost localized in private addresses forms a network of global nesigurnost. Every village and town in Serbia pulses with the nesigurnost of existence. This country went through at least four wars in the 20th century (Belgrade was bombarded five times during this period – both by enemies and allies). Everyone in Serbia lives with the certainty (sigurnost) of the next conflict that will set us back, exhaust us and change our lives whether we want to be a part of it or not.

Veliko Selo, Serbia – In the morning

One of the most prominent aspects of the future is its nesigurnost. Our wish to know the future could be as old as the first feeling of dissatisfaction with the present. Throughout the history of the human race, we have been trying to predict it (usually to be able to change it – which is an absurdity in itself – since if it can be changed, then the future has not been correctly foretold). One of the most famous prophecies in Serbia is the prophecy from Kremna (a small village in Western Serbia) allegedly created by two Serbian peasants, Miloš and Mitar Tarabić, who lived during the first half of the 19th century. They couldn’t read or write but they had visions of a future so fantastic that they could only be told to their godfather Zaharije Zaharić, a priest. These two simple men predicted wars that were going to be led in the air, technological developments that were going to change everyday life, diseases that were going to spread all over the world. A lot of people believed in the simple words about our turbulent future, and more than one book has been written trying to interpret them, but the whole story about this prophecy never became more than just an interesting topic for leisurely conversations.

Zrenjanin Vojvodina, Serbia – Work

However, some recent findings show that the prophecy may have been used on a number of occasions and by different regimes to gain the favor or take advantage of public opinion. As some analysts say, it has been rewritten and tailored so many times to suit the needs of ever-changing rulers and ideologies that no one can be siguran that anything about this prophecy is tangible. This takes the notion of nesigurnost to a completely new level.

Belgrade, Serbia – Fishing

But people in Serbia must have decided to agree with John Allen Paulos who said that “uncertainty is the only certainty there is, and knowing how to live with insecurity is the only security” because we continue to learn, explore and grow despite all the nesigurnost we are surrounded by. It seems that an invisible thread connects all of us and gives meaning to all the things happening around us, gives us sturdiness to persevere and faith in a future much brighter than any prophecy dares to predict.

Jelena Sekulić

Credits

Photo 1: Novi Sad, Serbia – Liberty Square – Florin Cnejevici

Photo 2: Belgrade, Serbia – Saint Sava Temple – Alexandarilich

Photo 3: Belgrade, Serbia – Wedding Race – dragang

Photo 4: Belo Blato, Vojvodina, Serbia – Fun – Roman photography

Photo 5: Brezovica, Serbia – Milking – Bora

Photo 6: Veliko Selo, Serbia – In the morning – Bane

Photo 7: Zrenjanin Vojvodina, Serbia – Work – Roman photography

Photo 8: Belgrade, Serbia – Fishing – Paul Prescott

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Phelps, Jade. Healing Journey Pulls Us Apart – America. June 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Spain, Tajikistan, Australia, Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emблem transpoзиция by Jade Phelps

I never had a migraine until I was 45. At first, they struck only occasionally. By the time I was 54, they took me down almost daily. I consulted with my physician, a neurologist, a chiropractor and an acupuncture specialist. I dosed myself up with the recommended mineral supplements like Vitamin B-2 and magnesium. Nothing helped. Most nights I spent half my time in bed clutching my head in agony, crouched under a waterfall of hot water in the shower. I rarely slept. I lost 10 pounds I didn’t need to lose. I had to give up my career as a fitness professional. Despite all the suffering and the heavy feelings of defeat, I knew there had to be a way out. A few times when we had traveled to coastal areas, I’d experienced a hiatus from the agony. I told my husband I needed to do something different. He agreed. I packed my bags and left Arizona to live on the Sea of Cortez in Mexico.

Phoenix, Arizona – Between desert hills

Kevin was still working in Phoenix when I started my new life in Mexico. That was more than a year ago. Day by day, the natural world healed me. I took long swims in the salty sea, stroking through the blue-green water, rising and falling with the swells. Pods of dolphins often surrounded me. I walked to the El Soldado estuary and meditated to the background music of crashing waves and crying terns. I met a Mexican couple one day at the beach. We talked as I strolled along the shoreline with them. Soon we started walking a few kilometers together almost every afternoon. We became close friends. The frequency of my headaches decreased month by month. I pursued writing again. I taught yoga twice a week to people living in our complex. My condition would only relapse when I returned to Phoenix.

Arizona, America – The wave

My husband retired from his job as an IT supervisor two weeks ago. Now he’s here with me in Mexico. But San Carlos isn’t the slice of heaven on the sea for him the way it is for me. He feels heavy fatigue here and is restless. He surfs the net on his phone and computer while I’m outside swimming and turning cartwheels in the sand. There’s nothing for him to do here, he says. I tell him about opportunities to volunteer in the schools, with different local charities. He always has a reason for why he won’t contact anyone. I wonder what the future holds for us. Me here. Him in Phoenix. Us separated, rather than together?

Mexico – Sea of Cortez

I wake up early. It’s 5:30 AM. I stretch my yoga mat out on the front patio and raise my arms in the air – the tall mountain pose. While I do five rounds of Sun Salutation A, I hear crashing waves, a chirping gecko and the shrill call of a woodpecker in a nearby coconut palm. I finish my practice feeling calm, my skin beaded with sweat. I walk to the beach and slip into the sea. I stroke through the water, feeling supported and safe. Most people are afraid to swim in the ocean. For me, the ocean is pure serenity. Swimming through the water feels so natural, so comfortable, it reminds me of who I am. It’s the only place I really feel secure. I know this sounds strange. Only I would say the sea feels safe when in the blue green depths there are stingrays and jellyfish and every kind of eel. But I feel completely at peace in the water. It’s where I can escape the uncertainty of my life. On land, I live with the constant fear of migraines. And now I worry about Kevin. He seems distant, depressed, insecure. I don’t want him to be unhappy. I love him so much. He made it possible for me to come to this place that helped me heal. I need to be here. But maybe here isn’t the place for him.

San Carlos, Mexico – Los Algodones

I don’t want to let go of what we have. Or what we had. It’s been almost a year since we’ve spent much time together. Now our relationship feels awkward. I’m always saying the wrong thing. Why can’t we go back to where we were 18 years ago when we first met? We were in love then. There were none of these stilted conversations and meals sitting across from each other, dominated by awkward silence. So often I look at him and want to know what he is thinking, but I’m afraid to ask. Sometimes when I’m out swimming in the sea, I wish I never had to go back to shore.

Cabo san Lucas, Mexico – Rocks

When I return to the condo, Kevin is sitting at the table, his gaze focused on his laptop screen. He’s sweaty from his trip to the gym. He glances away from the computer screen for a moment when some reminder buzzes on his smartphone. He’s retired now. He’s no longer on call 24/7. Yet he remains tethered to electronic devices. I have a laptop, smartphone and iPad. And I use them often enough. I’m glad I can call my kids whenever I want and post some of my new photos on Facebook. But Kevin’s devices seem to hold him prisoner. Does he notice the sound of the waves? Does he ever look out across the blue green sea and let out a long sigh of satisfaction? I can’t help myself. I’m so overwhelmed by the beauty of this place. San Carlos rescued me from constant suffering. Gave me a chance to start over again. But now I’m weighed down by uncertainty. What if this new beginning for me turns out to be the end of us?

Jade Phelps

Credits

Photo 1: Arizona – Lower Antelope Canyon – Vichie

Photo 2: Phoenix, Arizona – Between desert hills – Virrage Images

Photo 3: Arizona, America – The wave – Tobkatrina

Photo 4: Mexico – Sea of Cortez – R.Peterkin

Photo 5: San Carlos, Mexico – Los Algodones – Neilld

Photo 6: Cabo san Lucas, Mexico – Rocks – PixieMe

Photo 7: Arizona, America – Hunts Mesa – Bill

Arizona, America – Hunts Mesa


Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Çakır, Peren. Building a Future in Times of Uncertainty – Argentina and Turkey. May 2018.

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Serbia, Spain, Tajikistan, Australia, Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emблem transpoзиция by Peren Çakır

In June 2015 my spouse and I took a flight from Istanbul to Buenos Aires with two cats and two suitcases. The idea was to learn basic Spanish and experience life in this part of the world for six months. We are now closing in on 3 years of living in Buenos Aires. After only one week, we had already fallen in love with its great architecture, orderly neighborhoods, dramatic history, diverse artistic and cultural scene, gourmet restaurants, and green parks with happy kids and dogs. We were well aware of the dangers in some of its neighborhoods and harsh tales of robbery and crime. But those aspects did not stop us from cancelling our return trip to extend our Spanish education at Buenos Aires University while looking for freelance opportunities to keep living in the city. The rising political tension in Turkey was also another big motivation for us. However, our biggest motivation was that Buenos Aires seemed really affordable for maintaining a joyful life. Then suddenly everything changed!

Buenos Aires, Argentina – In the city

In December 2015 the Argentinian people voted for reintegration into the rest of the world after years of living in a closed economy with high tariffs, import restrictions, and a lack of economic cooperation with Western economic institutions. The political coalition of “Cambiemos,” which means “Let’s Change,” presented a new dream with potential new investors that were expected to come in the years after, cheaper high-end products, lower inflation, a reduction in tariffs, an increase in job opportunities, and a government with zero corruption. After winning the election, Argentinian president Mauricio Macri opened a new communication channel with the US and EU, promising to pay Argentina’s previous debts to international funds in order to bring in new investments.

Buenos Aires, Argentina – On the street

Argentina’s main source of income has never depended on the production of sophisticated technological products but on the agricultural and livestock industry. Although many Argentinians have been longing for the image of a powerful country since the turn of the 21st century, Argentina is one of those developing markets that has missed the train of technological investment over the past 40 years. The political instability, further undermined by several military coups as well as populist governments, is the main reason for its slow economic development. After the big economic crisis in 2001, the Kirchnerist government closed the doors to Western institutions and aimed to revive the Peronist economic policies of the 1950s, focusing on a self-sufficient economy and protecting lower income classes from the pitfalls of neo-liberalism through heavy subsidies. Until 2010, Argentina was one of the developing markets that benefited from the generous circulation of money around the world. However, the slowing flow of money, stories of corruption, a lack of solid investments and the globalization demanded by younger generations put an end to the Kirchnerist dream and paved the way for the rise of Cambiemos.

Ushuaia, Argentina – At the playground

Although Cambiemos took office with big promises and lots of enthusiasm, what followed over the next two and a half years were shocking increases in the cost of utilities (1,000% for gas, 1,700% for electricity, 233% for transportation, and 550% for water). The cumulative inflation over the last two years was reported to be 85% while wages increased by only 15-20% annually. The government eliminated almost all subsidies to end the populist policies of the former government. But this led to tremendous unrest, with both the opposition and even the government’s supporters objecting and causing several major protests that sometimes ended in violence. As future projections of Macri’s dream of a new Argentina were revised from a few years to an extended 20-year period, the associated greater economic uncertainty has meant a decrease in hope for the near future. People are suffering from the consequences of low purchasing power, a rise in household expenses, a recession and job cuts.

Argentina – Demonstration

Meanwhile, nearly 200,000 Venezuelans, mostly from the educated young middle class, have fled to Argentina to establish a more stable life thanks to residence permits facilitated by Mercosur. Many of them were lucky enough to find jobs, which led to even tougher competition in an already difficult labor market.

The people of countries that have traditionally been economically and politically unstable have a tendency to behave in a protectionist fashion during times of uncertainty. Past traumas involving frozen bank accounts during the last crisis as well as a lack of trust in the political and financial institutions have driven people to empty bank accounts, move money abroad and be less tolerant towards immigrants.

Humahuaca, Argentina – Celebrating at the Feast of the Virgin at Humahuaca

During my conversations with several supporters of Mauricio Macri, I recognized that they actually did not vote for him but against the former government. Many see this period as a transition phase, hoping for a new spark to ignite a better future. However, nowadays people often withdraw their salaries on the day they receive them due to their fear of the banking system. Several friends from the opposition claim that even the governors keep their money in offshore banks due to a lack of faith in the country’s economy. Moreover, robberies and petty crime have increased dramatically, as almost every day a new shooting or robbery is reported, especially in and around the tourist areas of the city. As a result of speculative inflation, there are big price differences for the same product even in the same neighborhood. Shopping in Buenos Aires has turned into a treasure hunt in search of the cheapest product and discount at big supermarkets.

Buenos Aires, Argentina – In a train car 

Since our dream of finding some economic and emotional stability has been suspended, going back home and creating an alternative future has become the main topic of long conversations with my spouse and friends. As Argentina and Turkey are in a race for the largest current account deficit, greatest devaluation of local currencies against the US Dollar, and most despair for the near future, we are stuck at the moment and confused. Our financial situation will not be able to bear any further significant price increases in the main items we need to survive. However, we are not sure if going back home will provide us with any economic stability to save money and make investments for our future. Turkey has received 3.5 million Syrians in the last five years and the Turkish population is not happy either, in part because of the increase in competition on the labor market. Meanwhile there are not any solid investments except for the real estate market. Increasing polarization, hostility and worsening political relations with the rest of the world do not make our homeland one of the best places to return to except for the love of family and friends.

Iruya, Argentina – On the street

Trying to live in a Zen state of mind, I continue to dance with my beautiful, new Venezuelan friends in my flamenco class, enjoy the great artistic and cultural scene in the city, share quality moments with my spouse and cats, while dreaming of a beautiful future at an uncertain time in an unknown place. Living with uncertainty brings great anxiety but also great flexibility and imagination. As long as the planet survives, there will always be ways of getting by. However, the prospect of establishing any economic and emotional security will likely remain a mystery for the foreseeable future.

Peren Çakır

Credits

Photo 1: Argentina – On the coast – Anonymous

Photo 2: Buenos Aires, Argentina – In the city – Anonymous

Photo 3: Buenos Aires, Argentina – On the street – Anonymous

Photo 4: Ushuaia, Argentina – At the playground – Alice Nerr

Photo 5: Argentina – Demonstration – Özgür Çetinkaya

Photo 6: Humahuaca, Argentina – Celebrating at the Feast of the Virgin at Humahuaca – Fotoember

Photo 7: Buenos Aires, Argentina – In a train car – Antvik

Photo 8: Iruya, Argentina – On the street – Fotoember

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Krnceska, Sofija. No Name Country – Macedonia. May 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from America, Serbia, Spain, Tajikistan, Australia, Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpoзиция by Sofija Krnceska

It’s the middle of the night at a run-down train station. The rain has been pouring harder than ever. People from a nation without a name and with an unknown number of inhabitants, soaking wet and tired, are waiting for the train to stop at their station and lead them to сигурност (certainty). The train has been late for nearly three decades now. But that hasn’t stopped these people from waiting. They have had ups of enthusiasm followed by downs of hopelessness. But they haven’t given up the wait. Why? Because the wait is all they (think they) have. Because they don’t want to admit they were wrong. Because they lack courage to stop. Stopping would mean starting something anew. And starting anew would mean giving up the wait, which has become everything they have.

Prilep, Macedonia – Waiting

Our country is one of those post-socialist countries which gained their independence during the last decades of the 20th century. It is difficult to say how many people live here at the moment. According to the last census, held in 2002, the number of residents was 2,022,547. In these last 16 years, we have been having some trouble organizing a new census. We even had one unsuccessful attempt in 2011. In the meantime, a total of 21 elections have been held since 1990. No trouble organizing those.

Bitola, Macedonia – Hanging out

We are located at the heart of the Balkans, neighboring 5 (some would say 4) other countries. Almost immediately after declaring our independence, our neighbors made it clear that they had issues with us: for some, the issue was our name; for others, it was our language, our church, our identity, our history or some combination of the above. We like every single one of our neighbors. We don’t have anything against their names, languages, churches, identities, etc. We want them to like us too. We want them to be our partners and friends. Our neighbors want us to fail. They have been patiently waiting for us to fail while we have been patiently waiting for them to start liking us. They are winning the waiting game.

Prilep, Macedonia – Waiting – 2

After declaring independence, we also announced our ambition to join the EU and NATO. That was nearly three decades ago. After a period of vague transition, the EU and NATO were seen as organizations that could help us get back on our feet. We are geographically part of Europe, so we assumed the EU was where we belonged and, since NATO comes hand-in-hand with the EU, we looked to join it as well. We want the EU and NATO to like us. We want to be a part of that big, democratic family. But the feeling doesn’t seem to be mutual. The EU and NATO want us to resolve the open issues that we have with our neighbors, especially the one regarding our name, before they even consider inviting us for a visit. We have been packed and ready, waiting for that invitation to come for a really long time now.

Bitola, Macedonia – On the bench

So, what have we done while waiting for that love from our neighbors and acceptance from the EU and NATO to arrive? Nothing. We just waited. And this dark cloud of несигурност (uncertainty) gathered over our heads, getting bigger and bigger as the wait extended. At times, the sunshine managed to pass through the gaps in the clouds, but not for long. Most of the time, the rain has been pouring hard.

In the meantime, our society as we knew it started to deteriorate. While holding on to an unreal notion of the future, we forgot to live in the present. It is not that we didn’t notice the problems around us; we simply decided to deal with them later, after getting the love and acceptance from the others. And the values we lived by and cherished? We will acquire new ones that will match the ones of our new family.

Prilep, Macedonia – At the town square

Did we lose anything in the process that we might never recover?

We lost ourselves. We lost our moral values, our integrity, our self-respect and the respect for each other. Persons and institutions that were supposed to be our moral pillars have failed us, time and again. And the younger generations started to mirror that behavior. Here is an example: if members of the parliament can constantly insult each other, if the language they use is rude and highly inappropriate, why would young people talk to each other any differently? Why would they talk politely to their parents and teachers? Why would they respect them? Why would they strive to educate themselves when education is obviously not valued here? Good education leads you nowhere, whereas rudeness and insults can lead you to a privileged life with unimaginable travel allowances. That’s the image that is repeatedly being projected to our young people, an image that they have come to accept as “proper.” What else did we lose irreversibly?

Bitola, Macedonia – At the pond

We used to be a country of green mountain pastures, blue skies and clean rivers and lakes. Not anymore. We have cut our forests and polluted our cities and villages so much so that our capital was on the list of the world’s most polluted cities this winter. We were breathing poisonous fumes instead of air. Our most beautiful lake, protected by the UNESCO, washed up around 40 cubic meters of plastic and other debris in the city center during a recent storm. How can you tell our country apart from other countries in the world? While driving down the highway, have a look out your car window. You will notice plastic bottles and bags caught in the high weeds along the road. Anything else?

Prilep, Macedonia – Waiting – 3

Maybe the most important thing that we lost is our self-love. Because, when you love yourself, you try to be the best version of yourself. You invest in your future. You work on your physical and psychological well-being. You put yourself first and you love yourself the most. In terms of your country, you protect your environment, you work on your education and you invest in your younger generations. You set goals to improve yourself (your country) and you work hard to accomplish those goals. Only occasionally do you look around and wonder whether your neighbors like you. Out of curiosity and nothing else. If they do, great, if not, you continue working on your progress. Because, it’s easy to blame others for our failures and to say that we are failing because others want us to fail. Finding courage in ourselves to start anew and to become the best we can possibly be is difficult. Therefore, we wait, while the dark clouds of несигурност are diminishing our last hope of a sunny future.

Sofija Krnceska

References

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_of_Macedonia

2. http://www.stat.gov.mk/pdf/kniga_13.pdf

3. http://www.stat.gov.mk/OblastOpsto.aspx?id=31

4. www.mk.wikipedia.org/wiki/Избори_во_Македонија

5. http://tvm.mk/vesti/ohrid/26685-denovive-ohridskoto-ezero-isfrla-otpad

Credits

Photo 1: Prilep, Macedonia – Center – Ace Kostadinoski

Photo 2: Prilep, Macedonia – Waiting – Ace Kostadinoski

Photo 3: Bitola, Macedonia – Hanging out – Mullough Macmonican

Photo 4: Prilep, Macedonia – Waiting – 2 – Ace Kostadinoski

Photo 5: Bitola, Macedonia – On the bench – Mullough MacMonican

Photo 6: Prilep, Macedonia – At the town square – Ace Kostadinoski

Photo 7: Bitola, Macedonia – At the pond – Mullough MacMonican

Photo 8: Prilep, Macedonia – Waiting – 3 – Ace Kostadinoski

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Sitorus, Rina. When Uncertainty Reaches the Land of Certainty – Indonesia and the Netherlands. May 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Turkey, America, Serbia, Spain, Tajikistan, Australia, Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpoзиция by Rina Sitorus

The only thing that is certain in this life is uncertainty. Growing up in Indonesia, the cliché is nothing short of the truth. People deal with ketidakpastian every minute of their lives. It has become the norm.

Jakarta, Indonesia – Congestion

When I was living in Jakarta, Indonesia, my morning always started with worrying if the bus would arrive on time, and when the bus arrived, I had to worry about getting a seat or if I could squeeze myself in. All this is due to the inability to schedule public transportation properly. Once I managed to get on the bus, I would still worry about reaching the office on time as a result of a traffic jam. Say hello to ketidakpastian in traffic. After eight hours of working, I again had to worry about whether I could make it to that dinner with a friend already postponed three times since my boss might ask me to work overtime that day. Planning a vacation with the whole family was trickier than launching a Tesla into space since there was always somebody’s boss who wouldn’t allow that poor person to use their vacation days. There are a lot of ketidakpastian in Indonesia’s employment rules as well, yet one thing is certain, you just don’t say no to your boss.

Bali, Indonesia – At the café

Then there is also ketidakpastian in more fundamental things such as the law, which makes people vigilant. When law enforcement is nonexistent, people feel the urge to take the law into their own hands. Another big ketidakpastian comes from employment. Not only due to the high unemployment rate, but also the global phenomenon of a “gig economy” where people work without a permanent contract, from project to project, without fringe benefits. And since health insurance is not mandatory in Indonesia, should you ever need medical treatment, you will only get what you can pay for. Which means, just don’t get sick if you (literally) can’t afford it.

Jakarta, Indonesia – Entrance to bus stop

It was a totally different world when I moved to the Netherlands many moons ago. Compared to Indonesia, a lot of things were and are more certain here. Just like in most western European countries. The public transportation schedule is dependable; there is always space for people on the train (unless it is rush hour) and when I want to use up my vacation days I just have to let my superior know in advance. People arrange meetings down to the minute because they are certain that everybody will be on time. You don’t have to worry about not being able to hit the gym after work because your workload is calculated scrupulously, and systematic overtime is unheard of. People even know what they will do on a Friday four weeks from now! That is how certain Dutch people are about their lives.

Amsterdam, Netherlands – At the intersection

But things are changing. Rather rapidly. Until a few years ago, crucial things such as retirement and health care were very solid in this country, for example, but people in the Netherlands are facing more onzekerheden these days. Constantly changing political agreements and austerity have caused people to walk around wondering: How can my children secure a mortgage if nobody gives them a permanent contract? Can I still count on my pension? How much more will it be reduced by the government? When will I retire or will I ever be able to retire? And although not many will admit it openly: What is going to happen to this country if the number of migrating Muslims continues to rise?

The Hague, Netherlands – Gateway to China Town

Despite all the good reports and studies, people are feeling really insecure. More and more people in the Netherlands are experiencing personally the onzekerheid of the economy, the influence of global problems on their country, and (though to a less significant extent) the arrival of migrants.

Take pensions for example. Ongoing revisions to the system, which was once considered one of the best in the world, are now becoming the root of onzekerheden. People are forced to live with the idea that there is no such thing as a “certain pension” anymore. The repeatedly changing age of retirement gives people a headache just thinking about when they can retire, or if they ever can.

Amsterdam, Netherlands – On the canal

As for healthcare, in the Netherlands it is funded through taxation: mandatory health insurance contributions and taxation of income. To be fair, health care in the Netherlands is one of the last sectors to be affected by budget cuts. Nevertheless, the onzekerheid in the economy has pushed politicians and policymakers to reconsider factors such as the affordability of health care and the generosity of benefits packages.

The discussion about migrant policy is another source of onzekerheid. How many asylum seekers will be allowed to enter the country? What should be the reasons for granting a permit to stay? For how long? And what are their rights exactly? If someone stays “illegally” while waiting for their permit, are people allowed to shelter them? All of these questions make people feel onzeker, due to not only humanitarian reasons, but also the sharing of (already limited) resources.

Bali, Indonesia – Praying

Returning to the situation in Indonesia, except if you are a public servant, you won’t get any pension unless you take care of it yourself. The same thing with health care, as there is no such thing as universal health care; the medical treatment you get is certainly the result of your own insurance.

It is funny when I think about it. I left the land of ketidakpastian to find out that the land of certainty is inevitably embracing onzekerheden. I guess the cliché is true then: the only thing that is certain in this life is uncertainty.

Rina Sitorus

Credits

Photo 1: Indonesia-Floating temple – Iswanto Arif

Photo 2: Jakarta, Indonesia – Congestion – Georgina Captures

Photo 3: Bali, Indonesia – At the cafe – Delbars

Photo 4: Jakarta, Indonesia – Entrance to bus stop – Georgina Captures

Photo 5: Amsterdam, Netherlands – At the intersection – Lolzdui

Photo 6: The Hague, Netherlands – Gateway to China Town – Ansyvan

Photo 7: Amsterdam, Netherlands – On the canal – Celli

Photo 8: Bali, Indonesia – Praying – Tatsmis

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Macedonia, Turkey, America, Serbia, Spain, Tajikistan, Australia, Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpoзиция by Verónica Lassa

There is a book that has been around for 3,000 years or so. It seems to have taught princes and emperors – as well as guided the folk – in the East for millennia. In the West, we had to wait until a couple of centuries ago to find translations in our languages and gain a unique sort of richness, a well of metaphorical answers. Of course it is an oracle; of course it is about divination. I am talking about I Ching, yes!

Buenos Aires, Argentina – Cabildo Avenue

Despite its old-age the book seems to be still in very good health today. Many people all over the western world are using it and studying it at present. I am one of these people. What is it that we look for when we pose a question to an oracle? What is it that we get when we receive an answer from one? My idea is that for both questions the simple answer is “uncertainty.” In the former we put it into words; in the latter we define it (in the sense of specification). I guess we use the book not because we want to wipe uncertainty out of our lives, but because we need to define its place at a certain time, regarding a certain matter. This is something I have been thinking about for quite a while now: What do I use the book for? And I finally asked I Ching: What is uncertainty? And my reading of the answer I received is what follows here.

Buenos Aires, Argentina – San Telmo flea market

I will not go into particularities regarding how the book works; there is plenty of material for that online. I Ching says that uncertainty is hexagram 37 with a changing sixth line to 63. It makes no sense, I know. But it is full of meaning. Among other similar concepts, hexagram 37 means kindred people, people sharing a common living space (mankind?). The sixth line represents someone like a patriarch, a much respected, “impressive” person, someone who knows and can go back to their own truthful style. Hexagram 63 means “already complete,” already across; and its sixth line warns about a danger: the danger of drowning in the middle of the river we have decided to cross.

Ushuaia, Argentina – The cemetery

I will risk some interpretations here. Uncertainty means being human among other humans on Earth, and uncertainty is to know. Something like: the more we know, the more we know we do not know. We turn into “impressive” beings when we know our own truth, when we choose the way we want to be among an indefinite and unknown number of choices. Then we come to know that our truth is never “already complete”; there is always the risk of finding our heads under water or falling. As if truth were something like a fence we are indefinitely balancing on. The aphorism could read: Uncertainty is what makes us human and turns us cautious. It is what defines us and protects us at the same time, because uncertainty is change.

Buenos Aires, Argentina – La Boca outdoors 

There are scales for the readings, and we can also include our religious beliefs in the answers, our own worldview in terms of life and death, love, loss, freedom or happiness. I have a confession to make: I sent the question and the answer to some friends of mine who share I Ching readings so as to see how they dug into the answer and what scales they could give to it. Religious friends read something completely different; they read their own uncertainties (much as I read mine in the first paragraph). For Christian friends, the “patriarch” was God, and “already complete” meant “after life.” This also makes a lot of sense. Uncertainty for them is: not knowing if there is a God (on the other side) once we have already crossed the river of life. Maybe, uncertainty here could mean fear that this life might be all, and that the river is there only for us to drown (and go back as a drop into some eternal current).

Buenos Aires, Argentina – Mar de las Pampas

It is a fact that humans have dealt with uncertainty in many different ways and with many different results throughout history. None of the answers were even close to solving the issue. Some have even turned their provisional responses into powerful institutions. However, the way we address uncertainty does make a huge difference. A Delphic oracle can give us a clue as to what we can expect from an oracle when we use a question mark for our uncertainty. There is a dimension we all remember well in Delphi, that of “know thyself.” However, there is also another dimension here that is not recalled as well: “care for thyself” could be a translation for the phrase epimeleisthai sautou. Oracles could be a great way of dealing with uncertainty.

Ushuaia, Argentina – Roller skating

Turning uncertainties into questions helps us both to define them and to find creative ways to act on them (not to deny them or find absolute solutions). I may say the book is still in good health because it brings us good health. When we do not feel the need to abolish anything – or to have the illusion of it – we find that everything that exists has its place, and even if we do not know it or we do not like it, if we can specify – somehow fix – our uncertainty, we can be ready to learn something new about ourselves or we can be willing to take better care of ourselves (and others) when confronting the unknown. Uncertainty could then become a technique of existence, a process during which we transform ourselves, a program, right, but one with an open end.

Verónica Lassa

Buenos Aires, Argentina – Forever bicycles sculpture

Credits

Photo 1: Ushuaia, Argentina – The port – xura

Photo 2: Buenos Aires, Argentina – Cabildo Avenue – Antvik

Photo 3: Buenos Aires, Argentina – San Telmo flea market – Boggy

Photo 4: Ushuaia, Argentina – The cemetery – Maciej Bledowski

Photo 5: Buenos Aires, Argentina – La Boca outdoors – Curioso Travel Photography

Photo 6: Buenos Aires, Argentina – Mar de las Pampas – Alex Ruhl

Photo 7: Ushuaia, Argentina – Roller skating – Maciej Bledowski

Photo 8: Buenos Aires, Argentina – Forever bicycles sculpture – Boggy

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Indonesia, Macedonia, Germany, China, Spain, America, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emblem tranpoзиция by Kate Korneeva

I guess all of us sometimes find ourselves uncertain when making a decision or choosing from a range of options. And I think that is quite normal. Even the most self-confident people may experience the feeling of uncertainty from time to time. We, humans, thank God, are not equipped with any PLC (programmable logical controller) or algorithm. We are too unique, too diverse and complicated for that. We are unlimited in terms of thought, feeling, ability and creativity. And that is great!

Moscow, Russia – Back above ground

I’d like to look at uncertainty from, probably, a somewhat unusual and peculiar point of view. “Why not?” – as I love to say. Can uncertainty be a chance? An opportunity to stop, take a break and listen to what is inside of us. In the real depths of our mind. What if uncertainty can be about putting rational reasons, logical approaches and arguments away for a while and feeling tiny needs, emotions and desires that sometimes can … not be ignored intentionally, of course, but may be unheard because we’ve gotten so used to making reasonable choices, the right decisions and successful arrangements?

Moscow, Russia – Look familiar

We’ve been raised and trained to behave according to rules, norms, standards, and principles on the one hand, and demands, expectations, restrictions and taboos on the other hand; to be good enough for our parents, teachers, employers, and society, in other words, to be successful from somebody else’s point of view. All of those social norms are inherited from our childhood and experience in life; they are our background. And they are a part of our personality as well. And they are also who we are. And all of them were helpful and useful and even essential and crucial at a certain point in time. And when uncertainty suddenly surfaces and our true desires become known, it may be like crossing a line, like seeing a red light in the mist, and, if we can notice or feel something, then it’s time to stop and reconsider notions, guidelines and rules we’ve been controlled by. Then it’s an opportunity to turn to ourselves, to our personal and individual desires and needs, which may not be approved or praised by others.

Moscow, Russia – On the waterfront promenade

And I should admit that it is not easy to get in touch with something deep inside of our heart all of a sudden. It requires us to be strong and persistent, to be ready to slow down and recognize those routines that have invaded our life, and only then to make an effort to change them. Courage is required. And staying in touch with ourselves is harder than understanding all this. I guess it is harder because we have to take control over our thoughts, emotions, and feelings, and it takes hard work and an enormous amount of effort. We have to take complete responsibility for what we do and how we do it. But the final result is worth it.

Moscow, Russia – Fashionable

I once tried. And that was cool. No logic, no reason, only listening to what my inner state was faintly saying. Its voice can hardly be heard, so we may become uncertain again: what if it’s better to follow our usual routine? Proceed as we always do. What will happen if I follow my still unknown desires? Will that be safe? Will there be any guaranties? We actually cannot cheat ourselves emotionally because our emotions, feelings, intuition are true to us. And that is what is called selfness. Mind tricks can take us in any number of directions. And who knows, maybe far away, far from what we truly are inside. But feeling ourselves and trusting our emotions is who we really are.

Moscow, Russia – Crossing

Uncertainty is not always as bad as it is considered. I believe the key mission we face is to learn all over again or continue trusting ourselves, our personal feelings, desires, and intuition. Sometimes it is really impossible to see what is underneath or beyond, but all of us are able to feel. The next time, we may view uncertainty as a chance. Let’s be brave and trust ourselves. Trusting ourselves and choosing ourselves is essential for personal harmony and inner satisfaction.

Moscow, Russia – On the street

Let uncertainty be a point where we can choose a different direction! Let it be a limit where we can take a deep breath and just feel, not think! What will it feel like then? Like fear? Like relief? Like exploring and discovering ourselves and being surprised? What reactions will we experience? Mine was like “Wow! This is my life! I live it my way!” No social bias, nobody to judge. Just me and the world. Was it like a sort of power, but still civilized and enclosed inside of me? Yes, something like that.

Saint Petersburg, Russia – Smoking

I think sometimes that patterns, routines, rules and taboos do not work and do not bring us inner satisfaction because we are all too individualistic. “Do it your way,” one of my customers told me once. And I did. Frankly speaking, I was surprised at first, and then I felt like there were wings on my shoulders. And that was the permission to be myself, to express myself and use my potential, my creativity, my ideas and my own personal and unique experience I had learned from the lessons of life. And I wish for all of us, for all our children and our parents to hear, at some point, this permission to do whatever we choose! And I strongly believe that the most precious permission is the one we give ourselves – the permission to get into emotional touch with ourselves, to feel ourselves, to discover ourselves. And when something is uncertain next time, let’s just feel and listen. It’s never too late to become ourselves and live our life our way. No repetition, no next time, no later, no other us. One life, one chance. One we!

Kate Korneeva

Credits

Photo 1: Chelyabinsk, Russia – The view – Daniil Silantev

Photo 2: Moscow, Russia – Back above ground – Elena Rostunova

Photo 3: Moscow, Russia – Look familiar – Elena Rostunova

Photo 4: Moscow, Russia – On the waterfront promenade – Elena Rostunova

Photo 5: Moscow, Russia – Fashionable – Elena Rostunova

Photo 6: Moscow, Russia – Crossing – U.A.T.P

Photo 7: Moscow, Russia – On the street – U.A.T.P

Photo 8: Saint Petersburg, Russia – Smoking – Vadim Kaipov

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Paraguay, Argentina, Indonesia, Macedonia, Germany, Spain, America, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpoзиция by Andreea Sepi
“Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency;
but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”

Benjamin Franklin, in a letter to Jean-Baptiste Leroy, 1789
Munich, Germany – English Garden

In an age like ours, when fast-paced technological progress disrupts business and educational models; when old commonly held beliefs are upended and replaced; when traditional parties become obsolete, and social media and virtual reality capture an ever-greater portion of people’s time and imagination – how can we NOT talk about uncertainty?

But truth be told, certainty has always been an illusion in human life and endeavors. As a young immigrant to Germany, coming from a very short-term oriented culture, I was always bemused by the constant and pervasive talk of pension plans in this country. Who, after all, holds the key to their own future? Can anyone of us really control the future or even ensure we’ll be in it?

Munich, Germany – English Garden

Uncertainty is, it would seem, a constant of human existence. It is, perhaps, our most loyal companion in the journey called life, yet we are not at ease with it. Because our brains are more comfortable thinking in clear-cut categories; and uncertainty, like its twin certainty, comes in degrees. People will always strive for lower degrees of uncertainty and higher degrees of certainty. Not many of us are adept at embracing uncertainty and sublimating it into a spiritual experience or treating it like a positive and exciting challenge. And even those that do, do so to overcome it, not to dwell in it forever.

Another aspect must be factored into this equation as well: we live in an age where scientific discoveries have created the expectation of near-certainty; and yet as a species we are emotional and unable to grasp the totality of knowledge out there or to verify all of it to a satisfactory degree of certainty. Human understanding and decision-making continues to rely on impression, belief and deeply rooted emotional convictions more than on proof of facts. Our understanding remains religious in nature: from deity to our trust or distrust of science, the paleo-diet or conspiracy theories.

Munich, Germany – English Garden

The advent of the internet and the 24-hour news cycle have increased our unease and turned fear and gore into a daily experience. Events become global and tumultuous. We feel threatened much more frequently than before. Some become numb, some become frantic. It’s all just too confusing.

Which is probably why, when uncertainty increases past a certain degree (excuse the pun!), we are bound to witness a backlash into what is perceived as “safer ground.” The changes seem to outpace our ability to prepare for them and adjust. Fake news, authoritarianism and closed societies proliferate.

Munich, Germany – English Garden

But is this really that “higher ground” that can save us? And can we be saved in this way? Can a country truly be autarchic in this day and age? And is that even desirable? A lot of people seem sure, but this is highly uncertain. Is the nation state the most effective means of government, or have societies always really been heterogeneous and the nation state a social and historical construct?…

Is not an open, liberal democracy much better suited to lead us forward, and is the peaceful commingling of cultures and the lively yet civil dialogue of ideas more likely to spark bubbling creativity and to galvanize society around that kind of intrepid cooperation it so desperately needs to adapt to the future and thrive? Or will uncontrolled interaction (especially migration) slowly but surely nudge us into utter chaos?

In Germany there is talk about a so-called Leitkultur, the adoption of which is seen by some as a necessary prerequisite for integration. And while we definitely need a minimum of shared values and norms in order to coexist peacefully, meaningfully and efficiently, should those values be cultural – of ethnic, religious or linguistic nature – or should they be centered around obeying and upholding legal and political norms and behaviors?

Again, who can say with any degree of certainty?

Munich, Germany – English Garden

Apart from these macro-issues, there is also a micro-level of psychological uncertainty in individuals. Some are unsettled by a crumbling relationship with their lover, some by losing their job, some by new building projects in their beloved neighborhood, and some by the chemicals in their food – by things that have stopped being the way they used to be. But what about someone who leaves everything behind out of necessity or by conscious choice? What about those that have lost or chosen to lose everything? What about migrants?

The daily grind of immigrants is fraught with the uncertainty of life choices. The language, the system, the job market, the expected normative behavior are all a mystery to them. Many years are lost on trial and error: trying a bit of this, a bit of that, seeing what works, accompanied by constant insecurity about decisions, then changing outlook again.

Munich, Germany – English Garden

There is that fundamental uncertainty gnawing at one’s self esteem from deep within: “Am I good enough?” Language barriers and differences in education systems place limits on expression and opportunity, there is loss of status and one needs to rethink everything they felt they knew about themselves up to that point. Skills that were considered valuable in one society are useless or in surplus in another. The immigrant cowers in the face of failure to get a good job, or getting it and being paid less than his local counterparts; she or he experiences rejection and is reprimanded for breaking unspoken rules she or he never knew existed and is eventually confronted with the burning question “Ce fac eu aici?” (“What am I doing here?”), and “Will I ever make it?” The nagging doubt of “Can I find a place here?” wears out one’s confidence to the point that another uncertainty rears its ugly head: “Do I even want to belong here?”

Different people have different coping mechanisms for dealing with uncertainty: some hate it so much, they give up and move back into better known territory, and eventually are left behind or even develop extremist views; some resign themselves to it and look inward, turning to faith, philosophy, patience, or family; some accept it and embrace it, treating it like a challenge along the lines of “what doesn’t kill me makes me stronger”. Some are risk-averse, some risk everything without batting an eye.

Munich, Germany – English Garden

However we choose to look at uncertainty, it is best to be prepared for it. And to keep in mind, it has always been there, and will always be there, even when the pretty curtains of demagoguery are pulled together to cover its gaping mouth.

To deal with ambiguity, we might now turn to the philosopher, theologian, and lawyer St. Thomas More, a man intimately acquainted with the dreadful effects of arbitrary rule: “the partnership of human nature is instead of a league; and kindness and good nature unite men more effectually.”

Andreea Sepi

Bibliography:

Eliade, M. The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion (1968). Mariner Books

More, T. Utopia (2017). Simplicissimus Book Farm

Nichols, T. The Death of Expertise: The Campaign Against Established Knowledge and Why It Matters (2017). Oxford University Press

Scientific American (online, on 21.03.18). https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/tough-choices-how-making/

Wikipedia (on 14.03.2018). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_and_taxes_(idiom)

Wikipedia (on 14.03.2018). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leitkultur

Further reading:

Kahneman, D. Judgment under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases (1982). Cambridge University Press

Schwartz, B. The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less (2016). HarperCollins Publishers

Credits

Photo 1: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 7 – Pillers

Photo 2: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 1 – Kasto

Photo 3: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 2 – Kasto

Photo 4: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 3 – Kasto

Photo 5: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 4 – Kasto

Photo 6: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 5 – Kasto

Photo 7: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 6 – Pillers

Photo 8: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 8 – Travel View

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Russia, Paraguay, Argentina, Indonesia, Macedonia, Germany, Spain, America, Britain, and other parts of the world…