Emblem transpoзиция by Rina Sitorus

The only thing that is certain in this life is uncertainty. Growing up in Indonesia, the cliché is nothing short of the truth. People deal with ketidakpastian every minute of their lives. It has become the norm.

Jakarta, Indonesia – Congestion

When I was living in Jakarta, Indonesia, my morning always started with worrying if the bus would arrive on time, and when the bus arrived, I had to worry about getting a seat or if I could squeeze myself in. All this is due to the inability to schedule public transportation properly. Once I managed to get on the bus, I would still worry about reaching the office on time as a result of a traffic jam. Say hello to ketidakpastian in traffic. After eight hours of working, I again had to worry about whether I could make it to that dinner with a friend already postponed three times since my boss might ask me to work overtime that day. Planning a vacation with the whole family was trickier than launching a Tesla into space since there was always somebody’s boss who wouldn’t allow that poor person to use their vacation days. There are a lot of ketidakpastian in Indonesia’s employment rules as well, yet one thing is certain, you just don’t say no to your boss.

Bali, Indonesia – At the café

Then there is also ketidakpastian in more fundamental things such as the law, which makes people vigilant. When law enforcement is nonexistent, people feel the urge to take the law into their own hands. Another big ketidakpastian comes from employment. Not only due to the high unemployment rate, but also the global phenomenon of a “gig economy” where people work without a permanent contract, from project to project, without fringe benefits. And since health insurance is not mandatory in Indonesia, should you ever need medical treatment, you will only get what you can pay for. Which means, just don’t get sick if you (literally) can’t afford it.

Jakarta, Indonesia – Entrance to bus stop

It was a totally different world when I moved to the Netherlands many moons ago. Compared to Indonesia, a lot of things were and are more certain here. Just like in most western European countries. The public transportation schedule is dependable; there is always space for people on the train (unless it is rush hour) and when I want to use up my vacation days I just have to let my superior know in advance. People arrange meetings down to the minute because they are certain that everybody will be on time. You don’t have to worry about not being able to hit the gym after work because your workload is calculated scrupulously, and systematic overtime is unheard of. People even know what they will do on a Friday four weeks from now! That is how certain Dutch people are about their lives.

Amsterdam, Netherlands – At the intersection

But things are changing. Rather rapidly. Until a few years ago, crucial things such as retirement and health care were very solid in this country, for example, but people in the Netherlands are facing more onzekerheden these days. Constantly changing political agreements and austerity have caused people to walk around wondering: How can my children secure a mortgage if nobody gives them a permanent contract? Can I still count on my pension? How much more will it be reduced by the government? When will I retire or will I ever be able to retire? And although not many will admit it openly: What is going to happen to this country if the number of migrating Muslims continues to rise?

The Hague, Netherlands – Gateway to China Town

Despite all the good reports and studies, people are feeling really insecure. More and more people in the Netherlands are experiencing personally the onzekerheid of the economy, the influence of global problems on their country, and (though to a less significant extent) the arrival of migrants.

Take pensions for example. Ongoing revisions to the system, which was once considered one of the best in the world, are now becoming the root of onzekerheden. People are forced to live with the idea that there is no such thing as a “certain pension” anymore. The repeatedly changing age of retirement gives people a headache just thinking about when they can retire, or if they ever can.

Amsterdam, Netherlands – On the canal

As for healthcare, in the Netherlands it is funded through taxation: mandatory health insurance contributions and taxation of income. To be fair, health care in the Netherlands is one of the last sectors to be affected by budget cuts. Nevertheless, the onzekerheid in the economy has pushed politicians and policymakers to reconsider factors such as the affordability of health care and the generosity of benefits packages.

The discussion about migrant policy is another source of onzekerheid. How many asylum seekers will be allowed to enter the country? What should be the reasons for granting a permit to stay? For how long? And what are their rights exactly? If someone stays “illegally” while waiting for their permit, are people allowed to shelter them? All of these questions make people feel onzeker, due to not only humanitarian reasons, but also the sharing of (already limited) resources.

Bali, Indonesia – Praying

Returning to the situation in Indonesia, except if you are a public servant, you won’t get any pension unless you take care of it yourself. The same thing with health care, as there is no such thing as universal health care; the medical treatment you get is certainly the result of your own insurance.

It is funny when I think about it. I left the land of ketidakpastian to find out that the land of certainty is inevitably embracing onzekerheden. I guess the cliché is true then: the only thing that is certain in this life is uncertainty.

Rina Sitorus

Credits

Photo 1: Indonesia-Floating temple – Iswanto Arif

Photo 2: Jakarta, Indonesia – Congestion – Georgina Captures

Photo 3: Bali, Indonesia – At the cafe – Delbars

Photo 4: Jakarta, Indonesia – Entrance to bus stop – Georgina Captures

Photo 5: Amsterdam, Netherlands – At the intersection – Lolzdui

Photo 6: The Hague, Netherlands – Gateway to China Town – Ansyvan

Photo 7: Amsterdam, Netherlands – On the canal – Celli

Photo 8: Bali, Indonesia – Praying – Tatsmis

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik


The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Lassa, Verónica. The Old Eastern Books of Uncertainty – Argentina. May 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Macedonia, Turkey, America, Serbia, Spain, Tajikistan, Australia, Poland, Chile, China, Russia, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpoзиция by Verónica Lassa

There is a book that has been around for 3,000 years or so. It seems to have taught princes and emperors – as well as guided the folk – in the East for millennia. In the West, we had to wait until a couple of centuries ago to find translations in our languages and gain a unique sort of richness, a well of metaphorical answers. Of course it is an oracle; of course it is about divination. I am talking about I Ching, yes!

Buenos Aires, Argentina – Cabildo Avenue

Despite its old-age the book seems to be still in very good health today. Many people all over the western world are using it and studying it at present. I am one of these people. What is it that we look for when we pose a question to an oracle? What is it that we get when we receive an answer from one? My idea is that for both questions the simple answer is “uncertainty.” In the former we put it into words; in the latter we define it (in the sense of specification). I guess we use the book not because we want to wipe uncertainty out of our lives, but because we need to define its place at a certain time, regarding a certain matter. This is something I have been thinking about for quite a while now: What do I use the book for? And I finally asked I Ching: What is uncertainty? And my reading of the answer I received is what follows here.

Buenos Aires, Argentina – San Telmo flea market

I will not go into particularities regarding how the book works; there is plenty of material for that online. I Ching says that uncertainty is hexagram 37 with a changing sixth line to 63. It makes no sense, I know. But it is full of meaning. Among other similar concepts, hexagram 37 means kindred people, people sharing a common living space (mankind?). The sixth line represents someone like a patriarch, a much respected, “impressive” person, someone who knows and can go back to their own truthful style. Hexagram 63 means “already complete,” already across; and its sixth line warns about a danger: the danger of drowning in the middle of the river we have decided to cross.

Ushuaia, Argentina – The cemetery

I will risk some interpretations here. Uncertainty means being human among other humans on Earth, and uncertainty is to know. Something like: the more we know, the more we know we do not know. We turn into “impressive” beings when we know our own truth, when we choose the way we want to be among an indefinite and unknown number of choices. Then we come to know that our truth is never “already complete”; there is always the risk of finding our heads under water or falling. As if truth were something like a fence we are indefinitely balancing on. The aphorism could read: Uncertainty is what makes us human and turns us cautious. It is what defines us and protects us at the same time, because uncertainty is change.

Buenos Aires, Argentina – La Boca outdoors 

There are scales for the readings, and we can also include our religious beliefs in the answers, our own worldview in terms of life and death, love, loss, freedom or happiness. I have a confession to make: I sent the question and the answer to some friends of mine who share I Ching readings so as to see how they dug into the answer and what scales they could give to it. Religious friends read something completely different; they read their own uncertainties (much as I read mine in the first paragraph). For Christian friends, the “patriarch” was God, and “already complete” meant “after life.” This also makes a lot of sense. Uncertainty for them is: not knowing if there is a God (on the other side) once we have already crossed the river of life. Maybe, uncertainty here could mean fear that this life might be all, and that the river is there only for us to drown (and go back as a drop into some eternal current).

Buenos Aires, Argentina – Mar de las Pampas

It is a fact that humans have dealt with uncertainty in many different ways and with many different results throughout history. None of the answers were even close to solving the issue. Some have even turned their provisional responses into powerful institutions. However, the way we address uncertainty does make a huge difference. A Delphic oracle can give us a clue as to what we can expect from an oracle when we use a question mark for our uncertainty. There is a dimension we all remember well in Delphi, that of “know thyself.” However, there is also another dimension here that is not recalled as well: “care for thyself” could be a translation for the phrase epimeleisthai sautou. Oracles could be a great way of dealing with uncertainty.

Ushuaia, Argentina – Roller skating

Turning uncertainties into questions helps us both to define them and to find creative ways to act on them (not to deny them or find absolute solutions). I may say the book is still in good health because it brings us good health. When we do not feel the need to abolish anything – or to have the illusion of it – we find that everything that exists has its place, and even if we do not know it or we do not like it, if we can specify – somehow fix – our uncertainty, we can be ready to learn something new about ourselves or we can be willing to take better care of ourselves (and others) when confronting the unknown. Uncertainty could then become a technique of existence, a process during which we transform ourselves, a program, right, but one with an open end.

Verónica Lassa

Buenos Aires, Argentina – Forever bicycles sculpture

Credits

Photo 1: Ushuaia, Argentina – The port – xura

Photo 2: Buenos Aires, Argentina – Cabildo Avenue – Antvik

Photo 3: Buenos Aires, Argentina – San Telmo flea market – Boggy

Photo 4: Ushuaia, Argentina – The cemetery – Maciej Bledowski

Photo 5: Buenos Aires, Argentina – La Boca outdoors – Curioso Travel Photography

Photo 6: Buenos Aires, Argentina – Mar de las Pampas – Alex Ruhl

Photo 7: Ushuaia, Argentina – Roller skating – Maciej Bledowski

Photo 8: Buenos Aires, Argentina – Forever bicycles sculpture – Boggy

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Korneeva, Kate. One We – Russia. April 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Indonesia, Macedonia, Germany, China, Spain, America, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emblem tranpoзиция by Kate Korneeva

I guess all of us sometimes find ourselves uncertain when making a decision or choosing from a range of options. And I think that is quite normal. Even the most self-confident people may experience the feeling of uncertainty from time to time. We, humans, thank God, are not equipped with any PLC (programmable logical controller) or algorithm. We are too unique, too diverse and complicated for that. We are unlimited in terms of thought, feeling, ability and creativity. And that is great!

Moscow, Russia – Back above ground

I’d like to look at uncertainty from, probably, a somewhat unusual and peculiar point of view. “Why not?” – as I love to say. Can uncertainty be a chance? An opportunity to stop, take a break and listen to what is inside of us. In the real depths of our mind. What if uncertainty can be about putting rational reasons, logical approaches and arguments away for a while and feeling tiny needs, emotions and desires that sometimes can … not be ignored intentionally, of course, but may be unheard because we’ve gotten so used to making reasonable choices, the right decisions and successful arrangements?

Moscow, Russia – Look familiar

We’ve been raised and trained to behave according to rules, norms, standards, and principles on the one hand, and demands, expectations, restrictions and taboos on the other hand; to be good enough for our parents, teachers, employers, and society, in other words, to be successful from somebody else’s point of view. All of those social norms are inherited from our childhood and experience in life; they are our background. And they are a part of our personality as well. And they are also who we are. And all of them were helpful and useful and even essential and crucial at a certain point in time. And when uncertainty suddenly surfaces and our true desires become known, it may be like crossing a line, like seeing a red light in the mist, and, if we can notice or feel something, then it’s time to stop and reconsider notions, guidelines and rules we’ve been controlled by. Then it’s an opportunity to turn to ourselves, to our personal and individual desires and needs, which may not be approved or praised by others.

Moscow, Russia – On the waterfront promenade

And I should admit that it is not easy to get in touch with something deep inside of our heart all of a sudden. It requires us to be strong and persistent, to be ready to slow down and recognize those routines that have invaded our life, and only then to make an effort to change them. Courage is required. And staying in touch with ourselves is harder than understanding all this. I guess it is harder because we have to take control over our thoughts, emotions, and feelings, and it takes hard work and an enormous amount of effort. We have to take complete responsibility for what we do and how we do it. But the final result is worth it.

Moscow, Russia – Fashionable

I once tried. And that was cool. No logic, no reason, only listening to what my inner state was faintly saying. Its voice can hardly be heard, so we may become uncertain again: what if it’s better to follow our usual routine? Proceed as we always do. What will happen if I follow my still unknown desires? Will that be safe? Will there be any guaranties? We actually cannot cheat ourselves emotionally because our emotions, feelings, intuition are true to us. And that is what is called selfness. Mind tricks can take us in any number of directions. And who knows, maybe far away, far from what we truly are inside. But feeling ourselves and trusting our emotions is who we really are.

Moscow, Russia – Crossing

Uncertainty is not always as bad as it is considered. I believe the key mission we face is to learn all over again or continue trusting ourselves, our personal feelings, desires, and intuition. Sometimes it is really impossible to see what is underneath or beyond, but all of us are able to feel. The next time, we may view uncertainty as a chance. Let’s be brave and trust ourselves. Trusting ourselves and choosing ourselves is essential for personal harmony and inner satisfaction.

Moscow, Russia – On the street

Let uncertainty be a point where we can choose a different direction! Let it be a limit where we can take a deep breath and just feel, not think! What will it feel like then? Like fear? Like relief? Like exploring and discovering ourselves and being surprised? What reactions will we experience? Mine was like “Wow! This is my life! I live it my way!” No social bias, nobody to judge. Just me and the world. Was it like a sort of power, but still civilized and enclosed inside of me? Yes, something like that.

Saint Petersburg, Russia – Smoking

I think sometimes that patterns, routines, rules and taboos do not work and do not bring us inner satisfaction because we are all too individualistic. “Do it your way,” one of my customers told me once. And I did. Frankly speaking, I was surprised at first, and then I felt like there were wings on my shoulders. And that was the permission to be myself, to express myself and use my potential, my creativity, my ideas and my own personal and unique experience I had learned from the lessons of life. And I wish for all of us, for all our children and our parents to hear, at some point, this permission to do whatever we choose! And I strongly believe that the most precious permission is the one we give ourselves – the permission to get into emotional touch with ourselves, to feel ourselves, to discover ourselves. And when something is uncertain next time, let’s just feel and listen. It’s never too late to become ourselves and live our life our way. No repetition, no next time, no later, no other us. One life, one chance. One we!

Kate Korneeva

Credits

Photo 1: Chelyabinsk, Russia – The view – Daniil Silantev

Photo 2: Moscow, Russia – Back above ground – Elena Rostunova

Photo 3: Moscow, Russia – Look familiar – Elena Rostunova

Photo 4: Moscow, Russia – On the waterfront promenade – Elena Rostunova

Photo 5: Moscow, Russia – Fashionable – Elena Rostunova

Photo 6: Moscow, Russia – Crossing – U.A.T.P

Photo 7: Moscow, Russia – On the street – U.A.T.P

Photo 8: Saint Petersburg, Russia – Smoking – Vadim Kaipov

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Sepi, Andreea. Uncertainties Galore – Germany. April 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Paraguay, Argentina, Indonesia, Macedonia, Germany, Spain, America, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Emblem transpoзиция by Andreea Sepi
“Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency;
but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”

Benjamin Franklin, in a letter to Jean-Baptiste Leroy, 1789
Munich, Germany – English Garden

In an age like ours, when fast-paced technological progress disrupts business and educational models; when old commonly held beliefs are upended and replaced; when traditional parties become obsolete, and social media and virtual reality capture an ever-greater portion of people’s time and imagination – how can we NOT talk about uncertainty?

But truth be told, certainty has always been an illusion in human life and endeavors. As a young immigrant to Germany, coming from a very short-term oriented culture, I was always bemused by the constant and pervasive talk of pension plans in this country. Who, after all, holds the key to their own future? Can anyone of us really control the future or even ensure we’ll be in it?

Munich, Germany – English Garden

Uncertainty is, it would seem, a constant of human existence. It is, perhaps, our most loyal companion in the journey called life, yet we are not at ease with it. Because our brains are more comfortable thinking in clear-cut categories; and uncertainty, like its twin certainty, comes in degrees. People will always strive for lower degrees of uncertainty and higher degrees of certainty. Not many of us are adept at embracing uncertainty and sublimating it into a spiritual experience or treating it like a positive and exciting challenge. And even those that do, do so to overcome it, not to dwell in it forever.

Another aspect must be factored into this equation as well: we live in an age where scientific discoveries have created the expectation of near-certainty; and yet as a species we are emotional and unable to grasp the totality of knowledge out there or to verify all of it to a satisfactory degree of certainty. Human understanding and decision-making continues to rely on impression, belief and deeply rooted emotional convictions more than on proof of facts. Our understanding remains religious in nature: from deity to our trust or distrust of science, the paleo-diet or conspiracy theories.

Munich, Germany – English Garden

The advent of the internet and the 24-hour news cycle have increased our unease and turned fear and gore into a daily experience. Events become global and tumultuous. We feel threatened much more frequently than before. Some become numb, some become frantic. It’s all just too confusing.

Which is probably why, when uncertainty increases past a certain degree (excuse the pun!), we are bound to witness a backlash into what is perceived as “safer ground.” The changes seem to outpace our ability to prepare for them and adjust. Fake news, authoritarianism and closed societies proliferate.

Munich, Germany – English Garden

But is this really that “higher ground” that can save us? And can we be saved in this way? Can a country truly be autarchic in this day and age? And is that even desirable? A lot of people seem sure, but this is highly uncertain. Is the nation state the most effective means of government, or have societies always really been heterogeneous and the nation state a social and historical construct?…

Is not an open, liberal democracy much better suited to lead us forward, and is the peaceful commingling of cultures and the lively yet civil dialogue of ideas more likely to spark bubbling creativity and to galvanize society around that kind of intrepid cooperation it so desperately needs to adapt to the future and thrive? Or will uncontrolled interaction (especially migration) slowly but surely nudge us into utter chaos?

In Germany there is talk about a so-called Leitkultur, the adoption of which is seen by some as a necessary prerequisite for integration. And while we definitely need a minimum of shared values and norms in order to coexist peacefully, meaningfully and efficiently, should those values be cultural – of ethnic, religious or linguistic nature – or should they be centered around obeying and upholding legal and political norms and behaviors?

Again, who can say with any degree of certainty?

Munich, Germany – English Garden

Apart from these macro-issues, there is also a micro-level of psychological uncertainty in individuals. Some are unsettled by a crumbling relationship with their lover, some by losing their job, some by new building projects in their beloved neighborhood, and some by the chemicals in their food – by things that have stopped being the way they used to be. But what about someone who leaves everything behind out of necessity or by conscious choice? What about those that have lost or chosen to lose everything? What about migrants?

The daily grind of immigrants is fraught with the uncertainty of life choices. The language, the system, the job market, the expected normative behavior are all a mystery to them. Many years are lost on trial and error: trying a bit of this, a bit of that, seeing what works, accompanied by constant insecurity about decisions, then changing outlook again.

Munich, Germany – English Garden

There is that fundamental uncertainty gnawing at one’s self esteem from deep within: “Am I good enough?” Language barriers and differences in education systems place limits on expression and opportunity, there is loss of status and one needs to rethink everything they felt they knew about themselves up to that point. Skills that were considered valuable in one society are useless or in surplus in another. The immigrant cowers in the face of failure to get a good job, or getting it and being paid less than his local counterparts; she or he experiences rejection and is reprimanded for breaking unspoken rules she or he never knew existed and is eventually confronted with the burning question “Ce fac eu aici?” (“What am I doing here?”), and “Will I ever make it?” The nagging doubt of “Can I find a place here?” wears out one’s confidence to the point that another uncertainty rears its ugly head: “Do I even want to belong here?”

Different people have different coping mechanisms for dealing with uncertainty: some hate it so much, they give up and move back into better known territory, and eventually are left behind or even develop extremist views; some resign themselves to it and look inward, turning to faith, philosophy, patience, or family; some accept it and embrace it, treating it like a challenge along the lines of “what doesn’t kill me makes me stronger”. Some are risk-averse, some risk everything without batting an eye.

Munich, Germany – English Garden

However we choose to look at uncertainty, it is best to be prepared for it. And to keep in mind, it has always been there, and will always be there, even when the pretty curtains of demagoguery are pulled together to cover its gaping mouth.

To deal with ambiguity, we might now turn to the philosopher, theologian, and lawyer St. Thomas More, a man intimately acquainted with the dreadful effects of arbitrary rule: “the partnership of human nature is instead of a league; and kindness and good nature unite men more effectually.”

Andreea Sepi

Bibliography:

Eliade, M. The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion (1968). Mariner Books

More, T. Utopia (2017). Simplicissimus Book Farm

Nichols, T. The Death of Expertise: The Campaign Against Established Knowledge and Why It Matters (2017). Oxford University Press

Scientific American (online, on 21.03.18). https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/tough-choices-how-making/

Wikipedia (on 14.03.2018). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_and_taxes_(idiom)

Wikipedia (on 14.03.2018). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leitkultur

Further reading:

Kahneman, D. Judgment under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases (1982). Cambridge University Press

Schwartz, B. The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less (2016). HarperCollins Publishers

Credits

Photo 1: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 7 – Pillers

Photo 2: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 1 – Kasto

Photo 3: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 2 – Kasto

Photo 4: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 3 – Kasto

Photo 5: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 4 – Kasto

Photo 6: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 5 – Kasto

Photo 7: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 6 – Pillers

Photo 8: Munich, Germany – English Garden – 8 – Travel View

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Vuka. Lacking Uncertainty in Political Culture – Serbia. April 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Russia, Paraguay, Argentina, Indonesia, Macedonia, Germany, Spain, America, Britain, and other parts of the world…

Local Political Climate Change and Political Heating Deniers
Emblem transpoзиция by Vuka [Vuka kao reka]

Ш’а има б’ате? = Wuzzup bro?
‘Ладим јаја… = Just chillin’…

Legend says that the Serb idiom “‘ladim jaja” (lit.: “keeping my testicles cool”) has its etymology derived from the system of small trenches carved into Roman Senate seats to run fresh water through them for the purpose of, by cooling participants’ private parts, keeping the political discussion vigorous, but not heated. Serbs’ popular conception of the ancient Roman political system involves an interconnected pool of bidets where representatives were supposed to get comfortable. Serbs’ popular conception of the contemporary local political system is radically different than our western pra-con-continentals.

Novi Sad – Serbia

This is a story of my experiential short excerpts of life between pre-electoral campaigns in a country run by a person who has a hard time keeping their position with a full mandate.

Think not. Over the past 20 years Serbia has been one of the countries with the highest number of early elections in this millennium. Maybe we will end up in the Guinness Book of World Records. There’s a sense of urgency heating up the Politics of the Motherland’s System (PMS) in a country of highly racist,1 highly2 particularistic3 compatriots at the western side of “Middle East meets West” (central = Greece; eastern = Turkey; western = Italy) and no outdated coolin’ water trench system, whatsoever. Let us not dig deeper into the clogs deposited in the pelvic area of our politicians’ lymphatic system. And let us take time to lament unattended drainage systems in farming areas that are so clogged with weeds and unwittingly deposited garbage that every snow-melting season, no matter how mild the snow was, it produces massive tragic flooding in suburban and small town areas. And, of course, calls to campaign for crowdfunding to help out. And then there is the normalization of lingering on the receiving end of humanitarian aid while obtaining expensive loans for luxurious projects – that is also one huge part of the Current Political Climate.

Belgrade, Serbia – Celebration

Ever since I learned Boris Buden’s4 view on Yugoslavia being part of the avant-guard in the EU5 (with respect to the rise of the alt-right), I feel like a weather-lady reporting worst-case forecasts, while in my face I’m as wet as one of Bowie’s News Guys.6 Tears for the Balkanization7 Affect Fears.

Sooooo, what else became normal in the dominant cultural identity8 of the neo-traditional, post-truth political climate of our PMS?

Belgrade, Serbia – On the bench

While worldwide investments in institutional scientific research shrink and accessibility metrics slowly slide into their own perversion,9 our politicians in power keep purchasing high academic titles from not-so-certified academic institutions. Then they proceed through public life, firmly convinced that relevant knowledge10 is automatically implemented in their minds.11 Unlike the old-school PhD’s, a great many of whom can’t stop sharing their enthusiasm about research and scientific exploration, our new traditionally uncertainty-lacking members of higher levels of the academic community as well as holders of high government positions – they keep firmly shut up about the science behind their degrees. A kind of self-sufficient node in a self-absorbed niche of the global academic network and international politics. The philosophy behind their political moves, executed in utmost certainty, is very тићу у кафићу (hush-hush)

Belgrade, Serbia – Retired

Even though Наташа Кандић* is shortlisted for the next Nobel Peace Prize, she’s not our new Madiba. And it is not just because she has straight hair, white skin and blue eyes, but also because she’s free to wander around the world while her thirsty-for-uncertainty compatriots, from prisons of their convictions, firmly hold that her project of finding peace and reconciling with the truth of Kosovo12 is about some Albanian Pride Street Party now regularly held around the Belgrade LGBT Pride13 or during the opposite equinox. With no dilemma, doubt, fright or worry, they firmly hold to the conviction that the RECONCILIATION is NOT about finding peace with one’s OWN SELF regarding the fact that:

Belgrade, Serbia – Zombie walk

Despite all the rivers of vocalized hatred for Albanians as such, Serbs know nothing of current life in Albania, but know everything about Kim Kardashian and Soraya.14 There’s no media outlet that would report from Albanian communities and be accessible in central and northern parts of Serbia.** That’s one15 disregarded fact, and the lacking uncertainty around its (ir)relevance is decidedly never examined. Again, not because official faith forbids or recognizes such a thought entertainment/experiment in any negative manner.

So we get truly emotional about the tone with which one buzzword or another, googled out in cyr/lat, resonates. It is as if Pavlov’s dog vocalized its saliva and printed it to circulate nationally. As the most recent winner16 of Serbia’s most respectable book prize would say, the corporal archiving17 manner reflectingly depicts the holder of official truth.***

Zrenjanin, Vojvodina, Serbia – Through the fence

Then, there’s comforting uncertainty also present in our current PMS phase. The most obvious example can be seen in political statements by public personas discussing left-wing politics. Even though they claim to be totally atheist, they talk of “new people who will come and build a better system for all of us.” Those new people18 (according to the politicians and intelligentsia in the national political opposition) will have unstained but rich professional resumes and be competent, experienced and relevant – despite the fact that one can either work for our crumbling system and have a rich professional resume or be new. The uncertainty of why those left-wing atheist so firmly believe in a sort of collective Second Coming is never seriously examined. Instead, this particular uncertainty is cherished as fuel for their self-righteousness and as grounds for their relevance. The certainty is that, although they don’t know much about the New People, they are absolutely convinced and uncertainty-lacking that it’s not them personally. Nor them, personally, are the people who should try to push beyond their denigrating diagnosis of our PMS, and, instead of ridiculing the dominant political option, try devising a way to heal and reconcile. Maybe even open some space for building a functional system.

Borca, Serbia – Shepherdess

Obedience in hatred and in ridicule, no matter how uniform and massively present the uncertainty-lacking conviction is in our society, it is a conviction that officially doesn’t have its place in state-recognized religion, nor in philosophies which self-perceive as liberal and progressive. It’s just our PMS phase.

Why open up space for solidarity and learn better political solutions if we can just sit and wait for someone to have the system of our liking served to us?

In Belgrade, early equinox 2018
Vuka [Vuka kao reka]

*Googling Natasa Kandic in Cyrillic and in Latin returns with two completely different sets of emotional charge in the resulting findings.

**Nevertheless, different sets of emotional charges feed Google search results for шиптар and hits for Albanian citizen.

*** “[Zoological, botanic, anatomic, anthropological] collections and stories within and about them can sometimes serve to propose a question on the structure/architecture of knowledge, along with space to examine structures of truths represented through given knowledge. For what shapes the content adopted as truthful is the manner in which the knowledge is being distributed/mapped/located within certain space and time. Yet we’re all aware that there’s always some issue about it, and the truth always ends up depending on the allocation of the facts.” – Dejan Atanacković, NIN Magazine, Jan 18, 2018

Bibliography

1. Kitsantonis, Niki. “9 Charged in Fatal Beating of American in Greece.” New York Times. July, 12, 2017: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/12/world/europe/beating-death-of-american-bakari-henderson-in-greece.html

2. Sanšajn 1991. https://youtu.be/jRlHzQSMLzE

3. Mirsad’s treatise on the history of Serbian particularism is to be published late April in the Turkey-based philosophical hebdomadaire. Until then, my translation to SrbCro is on ice.

4. “Buden gost Filozofskog teatra.” Abeceda Nezavisne Kulture. May 29, 2017: http://www.seecult.org/vest/buden-gost-filozofskog-teatra

5. Van Norden, Bryan W. “Western philosophy is racist.” Aeon. https://aeon.co/essays/why-the-western-philosophical-canon-is-xenophobic-and-racist

6. Bowie, David. “Five Years”: https://youtu.be/yYwpnG-rkHI

7. Tears for Fears. “Shout”: https://youtu.be/aI9lo5BRJmg

8. Jorgačević, Jelena. “Direktan presnos silovanja.” Vreme: http://www.vreme.com/cms/view.php?id=1480713

9. Roy, Siddhartha. “Science is broken.” Aeon. March 9, 2017: https://aeon.co/essays/science-is-a-public-good-in-peril-heres-how-to-fix-it

10. “Na zahtev opoziciji da izađe sa svojim predlozima pred građane, opozicioni političari bi mogli da odgovore jednostavnim pitanjem – a gde da izađemo? Na stranu što nema garancija da njihove ideje neće biti pokradene.” https://pescanik.net/u-susret-parlamentarnim-izborima/

11. Among Serb public personae, seeking consultation on mental vitality equals social suicide because mental medical records are easily accessible for sensationalist media outlets, and through them, gladly exploited as object of ridicule that is proven to sell well. “Insajder: Neko iz MUP dao medijima medicinski karton Kornica” Insajder. December 8, 2017: http://rs.n1info.com/a347867/Vesti/Vesti/Insajder-Neko-iz-MUP-dao-medijima-medicinski-karton-Kornica.html

12. “Šta je REKOM” Peŝčanik. October 28, 2008: https://pescanik.net/sta-je-rekom/

13. Vrela krv: https://youtu.be/jki8Hsw4GS4, around timecode 14:14

14. “Bez Gaćica: Ovako Soraja tverkuje u minijaturnoj haljini ispod koje nema ništa!” Kurir. January 28, 2018: https://www.kurir.rs/stars/2984333/video-bez-gacica-ovako-soraja-tverkuje-u-minijaturnoj-haljini-ispod-koje-nema-nista

15. Sing4All 2: https://youtu.be/7h7gTHSX5

16. Atanackovic, Dejan. http://www.dejanatanackovic.com/Site/Home.html

17. Cook, John. “Muammar Gaddafi’s Body Is in a Meat Locker Right Now.” Gawker. October 21, 2011: http://gawker.com/5852183/muammar-gaddafis-body-is-in-a-meat-locker-right-now

18. A typical one comes from a political science researcher: “One of the possibilities is actually promoting a team of new people with unstained CVs, among whom the frontman would take position of the first among equals.“ (“Jedna od mogućnosti je upravo promovisanje tima novih ljudi neukaljanih biografija, među kojima bi frontmen bio prvi među jednakima.”) “Javni prostor zasićen Vučićem.” Danas: https://www.danas.rs/dijalog/licni-stavovi/javni-prostor-zasicen-vucicem/

Credits

Photo 1: Kamena Gora, Serbia – In the fields – Ollirg

Photo 2: Novi Sad – Serbia – gringox

Photo 3: Belgrade, Serbia – Celebration – BalkansCat

Photo 4: Belgrade, Serbia – On the bench – BalkansCat

Photo 5: Belgrade, Serbia – Retired – Bora

Photo 6: Belgrade, Serbia – Zombie walk – td.joric

Photo 7: Zrenjanin, Vojvodina, Serbia – Through the fence – Roman Photography

Photo 8: Borca, Serbia – Shepherdess – BalkansCat

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Romano, Mavi. An Uncertain Democracy – Spain. April 2018

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Romania, Russia, Paraguay, Argentina, Indonesia, Macedonia, Germany, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

Transposing emblem by Mavi Romano

“I am not an African” said John the first time we talked. He was born in Nigeria, but rejected his origin because his grandfather – he related – “was killed when he tried to change things in Africa.” He wanted me to understand that the work we were doing as consultants in an international development agency was in vain because the developing regions were still suffering from inexorable, brutal and widespread political corruption. The reality of political power in his native country opposed his deeper moral values. John and I see eye to eye on this.

2017 marked the beginning of a crisis in Spain with the call for a referendum to self-determine the status of Catalonia, which the central government and Spanish society, for the most part, has considered to be a challenge to the unity of the state.

Barcelona, Spain – Homeless

On October 1, state repression exercised upon more than two million voters ended with close to a thousand people being injured, the imprisonment of political and social leaders without trial, and accusations of criminal offences such as rebellion, sedition and embezzlement – although the people accused did not act violently or incite violence at any time – and was followed by central government intervention in Catalan institutions. All this shows the de facto limits of an uncertain democracy that puts the idea of the Spanish nation state’s unity before internationally recognized fundamental civil rights such freedom of expression, a right to self-determination, and political freedom. With a central government that considers dialogue or changing the 1978 Spanish legal framework to be almost treason against Spanish sovereignty and a truce that could favor the enemy, we have a long haul before us.

In alternative social networks and media, we have started to talk about opening a new constituent process in Spain. The lack of legitimacy in the current legal and political framework – the Spanish parliamentary monarchy – is based on the de facto continuity of Franco’s oligarchies and a continuous decline in Spanish sovereignty in both foreign affairs and domestic issues.

Los Ports Mountains, Spain – Picnic

Franco’s myth of Spanish national sovereignty

The ideological inheritance of the Spanish nation defined as “one, big and free” from Franco’s dictatorship is expressed in the will to preserve its unity, which is based on the territorial integrity that remains from its colonial past, and the nation’s independence from any foreign intervention.1 Years ago, a headline captured the declaration of King Juan Carlos: “Franco held my hand and asked me to preserve Spain’s unity.”2

The fascist military uprising that put an end to the Second Spanish Republic – which was democratically elected – and led to civil war (1936-1939) started in southeastern Spain (Extremadura and Andalusia) as a large-scale attack by rebellious militias against the civilian population. Among their leaders was the bloodthirsty Queipo del Llano, who is responsible for exterminating thousands of civilians and using his radio station from Sevilla to incite indiscriminate brutality against any military or civilian dissident, including the mass rape of women.3

Barcelona, Spain – In the Gothic Quarter

The first intervention by the United States in Spanish political affairs dates to the years of the civil war. The US oil corporation Texaco4 diverted oil shipments contracted by the Republican government to Franco’s forces, so that the fascist forces invading Spain received from the United States the only critical resource that Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy could not provide.5 The fascist forces won the war.6

Some years later, the Franco and Eisenhower governments signed the Pact of Madrid in 1953 to establish military cooperation between Spain and the United States, with four military bases being built in Spanish territory in return for economic and military support.7

Thirty years later, in 1973, the terrorist group ETA killed Franco’s Carrero Blanco, president of the government at that time. The attack by blowing up the car in which he was inside happened within some 800 meters of the US Embassy in Madrid, although US authorities did not report any abnormal incident in the area during time the terrorists were digging the tunnel where they placed the explosives. The explosives involved C4, which during those years was only used by US troops in Vietnam, and could not be found in Spain. Two months earlier, Carrero Blanco had prevented the United States from using the US military bases in Spanish territory for an operation planned during the Yom Kippur War.8

Barcelona, Spain – Seated 

A political figure will be a key part of the Spanish transition after Franco’s death and promote Spain’s entry into NATO, thereby favoring the geopolitical interests of the United States. Juan Carlos de Borbon y Borbon is formally anointed Crown Prince, one day after Franco named him as successor and gave him the title of King. His appointment – as the Prince stated in his speech9 – was politically legitimized by the fascist coup d’etat on July 18, 1936, skipping over the line of succession for the kingship. The headline in the newspaper El Alcázar read: “This is the Monarchy of the Movimiento Nacional” (the only channel of participation in Spanish public affairs during Franco’s rule in Spain).10 Two days after Franco’s death in 1975, he assumed his position as King of Spain. The figure of Franco was honored in his first message addressed to the Spaniards. From then on, Spanish media left out any link between the Monarchy and the fascist coup d’etat.11

It is remarkable that during the eight years of the Spanish transition no referendum was held so that Spaniards could decide on the establishment of a monarchical or republican state. Adolfo Suárez, president of the government at that time, revealed to a journalist that the Spanish state had conducted several surveys, and the results showed that the monarchy would have lost. “The words ‘King’ and ‘Monarchy’ were introduced” in the Law of Political Reform of 1976. By linking the monarchy in the law, its permanence was ensured.12

Barcelona, Spain – On the bench

The coup d’etat that marked the end of the Transition and the final loss of national sovereignty

About one month before the military coup d’etat on February 23, 1981 (23-F), President Adolfo Suárez announced his intention to resign on television. The political agenda he proposed at the end of his term was not to the liking of King Juan Carlos. Among other issues, it is remarkable that Suárez tried to integrate Spain into the Non-Aligned Movement and not into NATO.13

On February 23, 1981, the military entered the Congress of Representatives, the lower house of the Spanish Parliament, with around 200 Guardia Civil and soldiers and held the congressmen hostage for some 22 hours. King Juan Carlos gave a nationally televised address denouncing the coup and urging the maintenance of law and the continuation of the democratically elected government. There are still a lot of open questions “on the King’s role and the coup as an example of coercive realpolitik taken to the next level. The gist of the [alternative] version is that the coup itself was orchestrated by the Security Services with the complicity of the Royal House and representatives of the main political parties and the mainstream media, among others.”14 The same year, King Juan Carlos met Ronald Reagan and decided to integrate Spain into NATO in 1982. The Spanish NATO membership referendum was held in 1986. In the question asked, the government’s position was implied: “In your view, should Spain continue to be a member of the Atlantic Alliance subject to the terms agreed by the national government?” The referendum saw 56.9% of the voters cast their vote in favor of remaining in NATO, with a turnout of 59.4%.15

The coup d’etat on February 23, 1981 marked a turning point in the democratic opposition forces. These had been massive in different areas during the 1970s (universities, workplaces, cities, intellectual and artistic circles, professional bodies, nationalist sectors in Catalonia, Basque Country and Galicia).16 Spanish society fed on a climate of fear due to terrorist attacks by far-right and far-left groups, repression by state security forces, and anxiety about a coup d’etat that could set the country back to the repression of the postwar years. For all that, the official version presented by King Juan Carlos as the savior of Spanish democracy was readily accepted and thus the consolidation of an effectively bipartisan parliamentary monarchy and the continuity of the Francoist power framework consisting of bankers, businessmen, large landowners, the Catholic Church, civil society hierarchy, a large portion of the journalists and intellectuals, the top leaders of the military forces, the Guardia Civil and the police authorities.17

Barcelona, Spain – On the Passeig del Born

The entry of Spain into the European Union (1985) allowed the country’s modernization and facilitated an international stamp of approval for its improvement of the health and education systems and infrastructure thanks to the European Cohesion and CAP funds. In the three decades of bipartidism that have followed, Spanish society has experienced numerous cases of corruption – currently there are 900 politicians from the government’s party accused in cases of corruption – and the monarchy has accumulated wealth that could pay Spain’s external debt. Furthermore, political power is concentrated in a few parties,18 and economic liberalization and social inequalities are growing (child poverty rose to 30% in recent years19). There is also the non-recognition of 140,000 missing persons between the war and Franco dictatorship,20 591 people killed during the years of the Transition21 and at least 4,113 cases of torture in Basque Country between 1960 and 2014.22

It is evident that democracy does not only consist in the formal organization of political elections every four years. As a state with tremendous cultural diversity, the basic democratic principles of popular sovereignty and integration of minorities should be permanently respected in Spain. The political crisis and the disruption of European funds supplied by the European Central Bank in the forthcoming months may induce a larger part of society to embrace the need for a new constituent process conducive to restoring Spanish popular sovereignty. This could make it possible to get corruption under control and pass legislation favorable to economic decentralization and the development of sectors such as renewable energy, ecological restoration, natural resources and water management, sustainable food production and rural tourism. In the hands of corrupt politicians, these sectors are regarded as markets that only benefit a few people. Just as in Africa.

Mavi Romano

Barcelona, Spain – Begging

Endnotes

1.See: Wikipedia: “Lemas del franquismo”in: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemas_del_franquismo
2. Editorial, “Juan Carlos I: “Franco me cogió la mano y me pidió que preservara la unidad de España”, La Vanguardia, 16/02/2016. Available in: http://www.lavanguardia.com/politica/20160216/302204993484/juan-carlos-i-franco-unidad-espana.html
3. Miguel de Lucas, “El emperador de todos los canallas. El terror de Queipo de Llano: el siniestro legado del virrey de Andalucía”, ctxt, 22/12/2017. Available in: http://ctxt.es/es/20171220/Culturas/16873/Queipo-de-Llano-Memoria-Lorca-Andaluc%C3%ADa-radio-virrey.htm
4. TEXACO has been present in Spain since 1923 (initially in the Canary Island and then in the peninsula and Portugal). See: http://www.texaco.es
5. See: Noam Chomsky, Failed States. The Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy, New York, 2006.
6. See: Miguel Ayuso, “Ni los nazis ni los fascistas: Texaco fue el aliado crucial de Franco en la Guerra Civil”, El Confidencial, 24/03/2016. Available in: https://www.elconfidencial.com/alma-corazon-vida/2016-03-24/ni-hitler-ni-mussolini-texaco-fue-el-aliado-crucial-de-franco-en-la-guerra-civil_1172972
7. See: Wikipedia: “Pact of Madrid”, in: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pact_of_Madrid
8. See: Fernando Rueda: “Los personajes ocultos del asesinato de Carrero Blanco”, Tiempo, 17/12/2013. Available in: http://www.tiempodehoy.com/espana/los-personajes-ocultos-del-asesinato-de-carrero-blanco
9. See: “El rey Juan Carlos I jura lealtad a Franco”, available in: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cc5V2GBQc_g
10. See: Wikipedia: “Movimiento Nacional” in: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Movimiento_Nacional
11. Ricardo Zugasti: “La legitimidad franquista de la Monarquía de Juan Carlos I: un ejercicio de amnesia periodística durante la transición española”, Revista Comunicación y Sociedad nr. 2, Universidad de Navarra, 2005. Available in: https://www.unav.es/fcom/communication-society/es/articulo.php?art_id=87
12. Editorial: “Adolfo Suárez no sometió a referéndum la monarquía porque las encuestas le dijeron que perdería”, eldiario.es, 18/11/2016.
13. See: Wikipedia: “Spanish transition to democracy” in: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_transition_to_democracy
15. See: Wikipedia: “Spanish NATO membership referendum, 1986”in: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_NATO_membership_referendum,_1986
16. See: Armando López Salinas: “Notas de un testigo: La transición española inacabada”, available in: http://www.unidadcivicaporlarepublica.es/opinion2/transicion%20armando.htm
17. See: Luis Gonzalo Segura, El libro negro del ejército español, Akal, Madrid, 2017.
18. Editorial, Europa Press Madrid: “Transparencia Internacional denuncia la “desidia” del Gobierno y los partidos a la hora de atajar la corrupción”, 04/01/2018. Available in: http://www.teinteresa.es/politica/Transparencia-Internacional-Gobierno-partidos-corrupcion_0_1936606455.html
19. Editorial El Mundo: “España es el segundo país de la UE con más pobreza infantil, superado sólo por Rumanía. Informe de Cáritas Europa.” 27/03/2014. Available in: http://www.elmundo.es/espana/2014/03/27/53340b41268e3ead028b4573.html
21. See: Mariano Sánchez Soler, La transición sangrienta: Una historia violenta del proceso democrático en España (1975-1983), Ediciones Península, Barcelona, 2010.
22. Redacción, Periodistas en español.com: “Amnistía pide acabar con la impunidad sobre tortura y malos tratos en el País Vasco”, 21/12/2017. Available in: http://periodistas-es.com/amnistia-pide-acabar-con-la-impunidad-sobre-tortura-y-malos-tratos-en-el-pais-vasco-95928

Credits

Photo 1: Barcelona, Spain – Fire run – Lopes Rog

Photo 2: Barcelona, Spain – Homeless – Elena Rostunova

Photo 3: Los Ports Mountains, Spain – Picnic – jjuncadella

Photo 4: Barcelona, Spain – In the Gothic Quarter – goga

Photo 5: Barcelona, Spain – Seated – Elena Rostunova

Photo 6: Barcelona, Spain – On the bench – Elena Rostunova

Photo 7: Barcelona, Spain – On the Passeig del Born – Hadrian

Photo 8: Barcelona, Spain – Begging – Elena Rostunova

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Home: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Ranaldo, Mary. Incerto or Flexible: Italia and UK. March 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Serbia, Russia, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

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Emblem tranpoзиция by Mary Ranaldo

Over the last few years, the labor market has undergone importanti changes in Italia and the UK due to a deep crisi economica that has involved not only Europe, but also the whole world. In many regards, these two European countries are very different. One example of this is in the terms used to describe the labor market where we find that uncertainty is the word most commonly associated with this topic in Italia, while the word flexibility is heard more in the UK. Italiani are always uncertain when it comes to jobs: they are incerti about finding one, above all a good one, and, if they are lucky, they are incerti about keeping it. Britons have a more practical way of thinking about work: finding a job is a matter of time and passing from job to job is called flexibility.

Venice, Italy – In the carnival

In Italia, the labor market is un problema which deeply affects our everyday life, above all the incertezza of finding a job. The topic of work has defined every government in recent years. After the boom economico from the 1960s to the 1980s, the governments that followed had to face the issue of high unemployment due to recessioni and structural changes. And the inability to achieve a sustained improvement continues to this very day, with every partiti politici on the left and right trying to address this crucial issue, and candidates in elezioni politiche taking advantage of the uncertainty by promising to create millions of jobs.

Venice, Italy – In the carnival – jarino

According to the statistiche, there are around 3 milioni unemployed people in Italia, and the unemployment rate has risen above 10 percento. However, this situation may be even more serious than it looks as uncertainty about finding a job leads many people to stop even searching for one. They are called inactive persone, those who prefer to stay at home rather than looking for work because they are discouraged by the fact that their search could last for many months or even anni, and feel they are not able to find a good job or what they would find is instabili and poorly paid. This is a very Italian issue.

Venice, Italy – In the carnival – jarino

This clima of incertezza causes two very different risultati. On the one hand, persone are bound to accept unfavorable working condizioni, lower wages than on average, and posizioni instabili. On the other hand, those who reject underpaid jobs or stressful work condizioni, prefer to leave the country, finding a better job and life abroad – the so called fuga di cervelli (brain drain) which deprives our country of its precious heritage and hope for the future. This issue is underestimated by our governo, as the effects of young people leaving the country will become a major problem in the years to come when the elderly popolazione will be larger than the employed one, and the work of a few won’t be able to sustain the burden of many. Italia already has the second oldest population in Europe. In the futuro, there will be many more retired people than younger ones, and the consequence will be incertezza in regard to receiving a pensione. As I write at this moment, the governo is thinking about increasing the retirement age to 67, which is definitely a very unpopular measure.

Venice, Italy – In the carnival – jarino

L’incertezza of keeping a job, even if it is underpaid or stressante, also causes collateral damage like increasing problemi di salute, above all depression, or the spread of other negative feelings such as rabbia, fear, and frustrazione. Young Italiani are the angriest because they are placed at the greatest disadvantage of all gruppi sociali. The failure of our governo is the failure to understand that work gives dignity to human existence, it gives individuals the possibility to be relatively free. The incertezza of work leads to incertezza in life.

London, UK – In the carnival

By contrast, Great Britain offers more job opportunities, and many Italians choose this country as their place to live or restart their life. Here the uncertainty of the job market is called flexibility, which has created a healthy system of employment in recent years, at least relative to other European countries, above all Italia.

Britain’s government is committed to investing in new solutions that will help young people find a job. Britain’s economy is beginning to improve despite the recent Brexit and disastrous forecasts and predictions. According to the statistics, the unemployment rate is below that of other European countries, at around 4.5%, the lowest since 1975, with just 1.6 million unemployed people.

London, UK – In the carnival – Gingell

Britain has never enjoyed the myth of a fixed job comparable to the Italian posto fisso, which gave certainty to individuals trying to establish a family. It is not unusual for a British worker to change their job several times during their lifetime. They can find different kinds of work, and losing a position is not perceived to be tragic, as it would in Italia.

The world of work in Britain is very competitive, but if someone demonstrates the will to grow and takes initiative, they can become a manager or assume responsibility for a team, even at the age of 25, while in Italia at that age people are still studying or have an internship. British contracts often include a package of benefits which allow workers to have a certain sense of stability and hope for the future. Another important difference between the two countries is that meritocracy is highly valued in Britain. An employer appraises the individual’s skills, their willingness to improve, and does not consider relationships at all. This is an enorme problema in Italia, as the key posizioni in our public sector and sometimes in the private sector as well are occupied by individuals who have become managers due to relazioni. And there is nothing worse than managers incompetenti running a company. According to some people, this is the principale problema behind the corruption and incompetenza of Italian public companies.

London, UK – In the carnival – Jeremy Richards

Of course, Brexit represents a crucial step in Britain’s future, and, when the country officially leaves the EU in 2019, it will have an important effect on the job market. At the moment, there are negative forecasts, and a sense of uncertainty is affecting the British population. Perhaps their heavy involvement in European affairs over the last few years has undermined their proverbial self-confidence, causing them to move from flexibility to uncertainty. We will see.

Mary Ranaldo

Credits

Photo 1: Canterbury, UK – The face mask – m.palis

Photo 2: Venice, Italy – In the carnival – jarino

Photo 3: Venice, Italy – In the carnival – jarino

Photo 4: Venice, Italy – In the carnival – jarino

Photo 5: Venice, Italy – In the carnival – jarino

Photo 6: London, UK – In the carnival – melis

Photo 7: London, UK – In the carnival – Gingell

Photo 8: London, UK – In the carnival – Jeremy Richards

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Escandell, Andrea da Silva. Compromise – Uruguay. March 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Russia, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

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Emblem tranpoзиция by Andrea da Silva Escandell

I live in one of the smallest countries in Latin America: Uruguay. My country is inhabited by only around 3 millones de personas who share many traits, preferencias y tradiciones: drinking mate, playing fútbol, practicing traditional candombe, going camping in autumn and enjoying the beach in summer. Most of us are pacíficos, tranquilos, amables y educados. We are very proud of our famous soccer players like Suarez, Cavani and Forlán and many others. We are all fans of our musicians and bands like La vela puerca, No te va a gustar, or El cuarteto de nos. We have renowned writers like Galeano or Benedetti and dancers, too, like Maria Noel Riccetto. Many of us love dancing tango or candombe, as well.

Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 1

Not long ago, we had one of the highest levels of education on the continent, and the crime rate was very low. Around 2000, however, things changed dramatically. La región (mainly our big neighbors Brazil y Argentina) underwent major economic crises that affected us tremendously in many different ways. The government also didn’t work intelligently. Poverty spread throughout society, leaving half our kids born poor and many of the elderly suffering from hunger; employment fell dramatically; banks closed; investors decided to depart; owners lost their properties, and those who had taken out loans suffered complete losses. This was a real moment of uncertainty. The first I experienced en mi vida.

Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 2

Uncertainty: no matter how much you had worked, no matter how much you had studied, no matter how high your qualifications were – you could be fired from your trabajo; you could lose all your life’s savings if un banco closed; your debts could rise by a factor of 4 or 5 as the value of our currency dropped overnight.

Uncertainty: your family could split up, as muchas personas decided to leave the country and start a new life in Europe or the US. Even your spouse or your children would emigrate if they had the chance.

Uncertainty: the reality of being controlled by outside forces, where your vida is at the mercy of decisions made by others, where you cannot control your own destiny or even foresee your own futuro because it totally depends on external facts.

Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 3

Some años later, there was a change in government. We could see the light at the end of the tunnel. Small things started to happen, and we could sense some esperanza again. Some measures importantes were taken, especially in regard to health and salaries, and the poorest people started to receive economic aid as well as educational programs aimed at preparing them for work.

Unfortunately, it was already too late; the damage had been done. Those receiving economic support were the same ones who had suffered from hunger and extreme poverty when they were kids. They were the “kids who ate grass” literally when they were children. That experiencia could not be forgotten. They had been rejected and left out for so long that they felt angry at the rest.

El resultado: our peaceful society changed forever. Violence sprouted everywhere; there was no way back.

Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 4

Those same personas receiving government aid are the ones facing the worst actos de violencia, in the streets with robbery, at home with kids and violencia doméstica, at fútbol matches in the form of fights, etc. Furthermore, most of the drug dealers live in their areas and earn their income from that business. So, ¿por qué would they even think about working when they can earn much more with their actividades ilícitas?

Moreover, the more kids you have, the more social benefits you receive. So the poorest mothers want to have many kids. Kids who are brought up in this environment, learning that you can live well without working, without making any effort or devoting time to studying or productive labor. What is worse, many of these parents are addicted to las drogas o el alcohol. Many mothers take drugs during pregnancy. So, the kids are affected by narcotics and alcohol while growing in the womb. Later en la vida, these children will certainly show different types of learning disorders, behavioral problems en la escuela and so on.

Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 5

As a result, this part of the population is growing up without any values humano, work habits and with tons de violencia. Many of them suffer sexual abuse from their own parents, older siblings or neighbors in addition to these hardships. They also learn from these experiences.

Uncertainty again. This feeling of being unable to find a way out. La sociedad starts breaking up into two grupos. Can we blame the unfortunate? They are a product of our own culture; it isn’t really their fault.

Another consequence is that hard working people, the other group, who devote their lives to studying and working, trying to teach their kids morals and ethics, find themselves discriminating, sometimes aggressively, against those who live on government aid, as they find these personas responsable for our society’s decay.

Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 6

As far as I can see, this very tangled situación brings us that same sense of uncertainty. Everything seems to be entirely out of control. No simple solution appears to help.

Perhaps, this problema social multifacético we are all living through needs a complex solution that can be summarized in one word: compromise. Compromise by society as a whole.

Compromiso by individuals who should stop pointing and blaming others and try to assume their role of protecting children and helping them whenever they have the chance: in the street, on the autobús, at school, in the parque, every day, everywhere, all the time.

Compromiso by teachers who are in touch with children y adolescentes who need support from adults and cannot count on their parents, so they can picture a better life for themselves.

Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 7

Compromiso by the government: feeding those kids, giving them una buena educación en la escuela, but mainly drafting laws that protect their human rights, returning their right to dream, to have hope en el futuro and to plan their destiny on their own.

Uncertainty will be the state of mind in my country as long as things remain unchanged. And since we are all parte de la sociedad, we are all part of the problem, but we should also be able to see that each of us plays an essential role in finding la solución.

Andrea da Silva Escandell

Credits

Photo 1: Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay – On the street – Fotoember

Photo 2: Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 1 – danflcreativo

Photo 3: Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 2 – danflcreativo

Photo 4: Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 3 – danflcreativo

Photo 5: Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 4 – danflcreativo

Photo 6: Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 5 – danflcreativo

Photo 7: Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 6 – danflcreativo

Photo 8: Montevideo, Uruguay – In the park – 7 – danflcreativo

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cooleridge, Tweeney. Uncertainty in the Abstract – Slovakia. March 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers from Italy, Russia, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

Emblem transpoзиция by Tweeney Cooleridge

Let me, please, start out by saying that I am not a philosopher, neither am I trying to sound like one. I am only a being alive, a bold statement that is. People are alive in many different ways. That doesn’t do it. I don’t know. That being said, there is a joke I have read on the internet that I would like to share. One man (Mitch Hedberg) thinks, oh well, I have a vest; if my arms were cut off, I would have a jacket. This would certainly leave him better off during the winter as his arms would not be freezing (which is not the point of the joke to be sure). However, some people say you can feel your missing limbs; they may even ache – which raises questions about the certainty of not feeling the cold.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

In today’s world, many a thing is being questioned. Is that the theory of relativity spreading into all areas of, shall I say, thinking? I will put this one to rest just like an off-shoot. The theory of relativity lacks the observer, go figure.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

I am wondering about the extent to which the predictions of prophets and prophetic writings are shielding us from uncertainty, provided one likes to be shielded at times. If you consider the fact that Isaiah walked the streets naked for three years for others to see, he must have been pretty certain of what he was doing, who he was listening to. There is no uncertainty in that, is there? It’s the time that leaves us wondering. If things he talked about were to be happening any time soon – some perhaps are – we would not be at a loss. But if some are to happen thousands of years from now – no need for us to be sure about them. They become uncertain for us, as they don’t interfere with our present lifetime.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

It’s better to let some things come naturally rather than asking to know. We may become certain that something will pass, but it’s wise to provide ourselves with the luxury of doubt and to concede to the fact that something happens only when it actually happens. Sometimes there is no doubt, no lingering in hope, but then being in the know makes us peaceful, especially if we “lingered” in fear.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

And then, even when things happen, we are not certain what their meaning is, or, different people see different meaning. Some people say that the only thing certain in life is death. Now, if taken hard on, death is where it all ends. But for someone who likes to see, there is a different meaning in that sentence. Language offers us a whole new level of uncertainty. Sometimes we don’t know what people are really saying. The consequence of Babylon, I would argue. It’s best when one can speak to encompass all meanings so everybody can find their own truth. Things said in the wrong place, at the wrong time lose their informational value and only amount to a heap of words that become useless. It truly is a loss of information. True information is a valuable asset that helps us gain confidence and certainty. Say my name is Michael, there are many more Michaels in the world. People are able to say the word Michael in such a way that Michael knows they are or they are not talking to or about him. I would dare to say the same is with the word Devil. When the information comes through, you know what is being talked about, and feel confident.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

I guess no one really knows what the future holds for us. The likelihood that things will unfold in an everyday manner is rather high, unless life takes a sharp turn. Anything can happen, even though the probability of really horrific things happening is rather low. But there is this uncertainty as to the duality – horrifying as oppose to pleasurable. I am prone to think most people try to live in a manner so that bad things are kept away. But then what’s so bad about bad, that duality, good and bad. This is the greatest uncertainty in language. Bad just can be something I have seen in a store where they were selling girls’ shoes that have “bad” printed on the back of one and “girl” on the other. Perhaps there really is some duality, but we should keep away from knowing good and evil.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

Such duality makes our uncertainty grow into a tremendous apparition, with fear growing parallel. Justice is the cause of that. There is justice in being taken by surprise, and chance is the substance of surprise. A king caught by surprise can shake hands with a beggar. It can make the one feel like a beggar and the other like a king, with chance being a vessel of equality. We can be truly certain that justice will cause us to answer for whatever we amassed in our hearts, just as there is uncertainty to the extent that we do not know if it will bring what we expect.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

Certainty may be a cause for disdain, and uncertainty the promise of hope. After all, I’d rather live for the chance of reward than the certainty of punishment.

Tweeney Cooleridge

Credits

Photo 1: Spania Dolina, Slovakia – At Night – Mat Kovci

Photo 2: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 3: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 4: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 5: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 6: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 7: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 8: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in Uruguay, Italy, Russia, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed and complete collection can be found at www.perypatetik.net.

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Emblem transpoзиция by Rahaf Konbaz
1. And they lived “miserably” ever after

Standing in a class full of displaced students from various provinces in Syria didn’t help much on the journey to reach certainty.

I asked them to draw a nice place they had been to. What I had in my mind, what I thought they might draw, was a beach with a blue sky, a city with entertainment and ice cream, or maybe a smiling sun in a big park, but their answers came like a slap in the face:

“I am from Idlib. I will draw Idlib City.”
“I am from Derazzor. I will draw my house there.”
“I am from Daraa. I used to live on a farm. I will draw our farm there.”

Syria, The Dead

I had no idea how it slipped my mind that those kids, who had spent the past six years at the mercy of bullets and arms, might even think of drawing “a blue sky, a smiling sun, and ice cream”!!! How could they draw something they had never seen?! Their pleasant memories stopped the moment they left their homes. They were still stuck at the last time they crossed the cusp of their city. At the sounds of the keys locking the door. Their minds interpreted the meaning of nice places as “my home”…Their homes were the only nice places they had seen!

Seven years ago, it was 6:00 am in the morning. The city was still sleeping. We took to the street. My mind was filled with these naive ideas I read from books and heard from intellectuals: We were putting things on the right track. We were writing our own destiny, we could make it to the other side of the river like all those other people on the planet. The plan was simply this: Move to the streets, occupy all the main squares, stay patient – some might be killed – stay strong – some would be detained… Eventually we were going to live happily ever after. We carried out every part of this plan, but the final scene did not unfold as we planned.

Syria – The Dead

I ask myself over and over: What happened? Why couldn’t we make it to the other side of the river? I do not know and have decided to call myself “Ms. I-do-not-know.” If anyone asks me any question these days, I just reply: I do not know. Seriously, do you really buy this illusion that you know anything in this world? I know that you tidy your pillow every night and sleep on this fact. Sweet dreams. But you know nothing.

But even if I know nothing, there is one thing I am certain of: If we hadn’t taken a step outside our houses to protest, ISIS boots would have never reached the soil of Syria. Those kids would have still been living under the roofs of their houses. Regardless of what happened between the two “movements.”

Syria, The Dead

2. “No voice could drown out the voice of freedom and dignity.”


Tawakul Karman can say whatever she wishes. She can brag about her victory, the freedom she achieved, and the dignity she enjoyed after a long fight. She is wrong. This statement, “no voice could drown out the voice of freedom and dignity,” which pops up every time the respectful UN delegates wish to gather and feel satisfied about their achievements on planet Earth is %$@@#$

The voice of military boots, the voice of arms and tanks, the voice of shelling can drown out all other voices. The cry of a mother, the mere sound of the cry, has the capacity to make you swallow your dignity and the naive concepts of freedom and democracy.

In times of wars, when the sounds of military boots approach, youths retreat to the sea. Many throw themselves in the water so they won’t have to wear a military uniform. Many just drown. Some reach the cusp of Europe, stranded here and there, pledging to be “good citizens” – just please let us in. While many of those who have stayed must put on those military boots because they couldn’t make it to sea.

Syria, The Dead

I contributed to this. I did my share in pushing these youths into the sea. I was one of those who joined the protests. Who took photos. Who tweeted, who blogged about the long awaited freedom. We thought we were shaping our destiny. The power of the people could never be challenged. They were meant to rule. I took myself to the second level of this movement. It was appropriate to be detained, so in one protest I waited for the police to come and didn’t run away. I let them take me. I was certain that the path of this movement was going to lead us to paradise. We were going to have a real election. We were going to expose corruption. We were going to ensure justice for every individual, with resolve and steadfastness. We were the generation which was destined to change the face of Syria. Actually, we did change the face of Syria. We changed its face to such an extent that no one can recognize the country anymore.

Syria, The Dead

I was certain. Then arms and bullets entered the scene, turning it into displaced people, children living outside in the snow. Historic city centers, another scene, were bombed to ruins. And all these new scenes pushed me toward the path of certainty. Was it worth it to displace all these people, to destroy one of the oldest cities in the world? Numbers, estimates and statistics began to envelope every cell of my brain:

Syria, The Dead

I am Syrian number 21109402. I have been living under an armed conflict for the past 2,160 days. During which I spent 11 days in detention. It is estimated that this conflict has claimed around 510,000 lives, with 6.1 million people internally displaced and 4.8 million seeking refuge abroad. Every day an average of 5 people are killed in Damascus City alone because of random shelling. Every day I head to work with the possibility of being killed by an average of 18 rockets or shells that explode in Damascus. Among all these numbers, there is this 133. We see it around every corner. It passes in front of our eyes every 5 minutes. It is the number of the Red Crescent vans which rush to collect the bodies.

Syria, The Dead

It may be that I know nothing, but of one thing I am certain – we should never have left our houses that morning.

Rahaf Konbaz

Credits

Photo 1: Aleppo, Syria – The Great Mosque – Michael Dinos

Photo 2: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 3: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 4: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 5: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 6: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 7: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 8: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in Uruguay, Italy, Czech Republic, Russia, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed and complete collection can be found at www.perypatetik.net.

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.