Emblem transpoзиция by Tweeney Cooleridge

Let me, please, start out by saying that I am not a philosopher, neither am I trying to sound like one. I am only a being alive, a bold statement that is. People are alive in many different ways. That doesn’t do it. I don’t know. That being said, there is a joke I have read on the internet that I would like to share. One man (Mitch Hedberg) thinks, oh well, I have a vest; if my arms were cut off, I would have a jacket. This would certainly leave him better off during the winter as his arms would not be freezing (which is not the point of the joke to be sure). However, some people say you can feel your missing limbs; they may even ache – which raises questions about the certainty of not feeling the cold.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

In today’s world, many a thing is being questioned. Is that the theory of relativity spreading into all areas of, shall I say, thinking? I will put this one to rest just like an off-shoot. The theory of relativity lacks the observer, go figure.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

I am wondering about the extent to which the predictions of prophets and prophetic writings are shielding us from uncertainty, provided one likes to be shielded at times. If you consider the fact that Isaiah walked the streets naked for three years for others to see, he must have been pretty certain of what he was doing, who he was listening to. There is no uncertainty in that, is there? It’s the time that leaves us wondering. If things he talked about were to be happening any time soon – some perhaps are – we would not be at a loss. But if some are to happen thousands of years from now – no need for us to be sure about them. They become uncertain for us, as they don’t interfere with our present lifetime.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

It’s better to let some things come naturally rather than asking to know. We may become certain that something will pass, but it’s wise to provide ourselves with the luxury of doubt and to concede to the fact that something happens only when it actually happens. Sometimes there is no doubt, no lingering in hope, but then being in the know makes us peaceful, especially if we “lingered” in fear.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

And then, even when things happen, we are not certain what their meaning is, or, different people see different meaning. Some people say that the only thing certain in life is death. Now, if taken hard on, death is where it all ends. But for someone who likes to see, there is a different meaning in that sentence. Language offers us a whole new level of uncertainty. Sometimes we don’t know what people are really saying. The consequence of Babylon, I would argue. It’s best when one can speak to encompass all meanings so everybody can find their own truth. Things said in the wrong place, at the wrong time lose their informational value and only amount to a heap of words that become useless. It truly is a loss of information. True information is a valuable asset that helps us gain confidence and certainty. Say my name is Michael, there are many more Michaels in the world. People are able to say the word Michael in such a way that Michael knows they are or they are not talking to or about him. I would dare to say the same is with the word Devil. When the information comes through, you know what is being talked about, and feel confident.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

I guess no one really knows what the future holds for us. The likelihood that things will unfold in an everyday manner is rather high, unless life takes a sharp turn. Anything can happen, even though the probability of really horrific things happening is rather low. But there is this uncertainty as to the duality – horrifying as oppose to pleasurable. I am prone to think most people try to live in a manner so that bad things are kept away. But then what’s so bad about bad, that duality, good and bad. This is the greatest uncertainty in language. Bad just can be something I have seen in a store where they were selling girls’ shoes that have “bad” printed on the back of one and “girl” on the other. Perhaps there really is some duality, but we should keep away from knowing good and evil.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

Such duality makes our uncertainty grow into a tremendous apparition, with fear growing parallel. Justice is the cause of that. There is justice in being taken by surprise, and chance is the substance of surprise. A king caught by surprise can shake hands with a beggar. It can make the one feel like a beggar and the other like a king, with chance being a vessel of equality. We can be truly certain that justice will cause us to answer for whatever we amassed in our hearts, just as there is uncertainty to the extent that we do not know if it will bring what we expect.

Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters

Certainty may be a cause for disdain, and uncertainty the promise of hope. After all, I’d rather live for the chance of reward than the certainty of punishment.

Tweeney Cooleridge

Credits

Photo 1: Spania Dolina, Slovakia – At Night – Mat Kovci

Photo 2: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 3: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 4: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 5: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 6: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 7: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Photo 8: Bratislava, Slovakia – Commuters – Route66

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Konbaz, Rahaf. So You Say You Want A Revolution – Syria. March 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in Uruguay, Italy, Russia, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed and complete collection can be found at www.perypatetik.net.

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Emblem transpoзиция by Rahaf Konbaz
1. And they lived “miserably” ever after

Standing in a class full of displaced students from various provinces in Syria didn’t help much on the journey to reach certainty.

I asked them to draw a nice place they had been to. What I had in my mind, what I thought they might draw, was a beach with a blue sky, a city with entertainment and ice cream, or maybe a smiling sun in a big park, but their answers came like a slap in the face:

“I am from Idlib. I will draw Idlib City.”
“I am from Derazzor. I will draw my house there.”
“I am from Daraa. I used to live on a farm. I will draw our farm there.”

Syria, The Dead

I had no idea how it slipped my mind that those kids, who had spent the past six years at the mercy of bullets and arms, might even think of drawing “a blue sky, a smiling sun, and ice cream”!!! How could they draw something they had never seen?! Their pleasant memories stopped the moment they left their homes. They were still stuck at the last time they crossed the cusp of their city. At the sounds of the keys locking the door. Their minds interpreted the meaning of nice places as “my home”…Their homes were the only nice places they had seen!

Seven years ago, it was 6:00 am in the morning. The city was still sleeping. We took to the street. My mind was filled with these naive ideas I read from books and heard from intellectuals: We were putting things on the right track. We were writing our own destiny, we could make it to the other side of the river like all those other people on the planet. The plan was simply this: Move to the streets, occupy all the main squares, stay patient – some might be killed – stay strong – some would be detained… Eventually we were going to live happily ever after. We carried out every part of this plan, but the final scene did not unfold as we planned.

Syria – The Dead

I ask myself over and over: What happened? Why couldn’t we make it to the other side of the river? I do not know and have decided to call myself “Ms. I-do-not-know.” If anyone asks me any question these days, I just reply: I do not know. Seriously, do you really buy this illusion that you know anything in this world? I know that you tidy your pillow every night and sleep on this fact. Sweet dreams. But you know nothing.

But even if I know nothing, there is one thing I am certain of: If we hadn’t taken a step outside our houses to protest, ISIS boots would have never reached the soil of Syria. Those kids would have still been living under the roofs of their houses. Regardless of what happened between the two “movements.”

Syria, The Dead

2. “No voice could drown out the voice of freedom and dignity.”


Tawakul Karman can say whatever she wishes. She can brag about her victory, the freedom she achieved, and the dignity she enjoyed after a long fight. She is wrong. This statement, “no voice could drown out the voice of freedom and dignity,” which pops up every time the respectful UN delegates wish to gather and feel satisfied about their achievements on planet Earth is %$@@#$

The voice of military boots, the voice of arms and tanks, the voice of shelling can drown out all other voices. The cry of a mother, the mere sound of the cry, has the capacity to make you swallow your dignity and the naive concepts of freedom and democracy.

In times of wars, when the sounds of military boots approach, youths retreat to the sea. Many throw themselves in the water so they won’t have to wear a military uniform. Many just drown. Some reach the cusp of Europe, stranded here and there, pledging to be “good citizens” – just please let us in. While many of those who have stayed must put on those military boots because they couldn’t make it to sea.

Syria, The Dead

I contributed to this. I did my share in pushing these youths into the sea. I was one of those who joined the protests. Who took photos. Who tweeted, who blogged about the long awaited freedom. We thought we were shaping our destiny. The power of the people could never be challenged. They were meant to rule. I took myself to the second level of this movement. It was appropriate to be detained, so in one protest I waited for the police to come and didn’t run away. I let them take me. I was certain that the path of this movement was going to lead us to paradise. We were going to have a real election. We were going to expose corruption. We were going to ensure justice for every individual, with resolve and steadfastness. We were the generation which was destined to change the face of Syria. Actually, we did change the face of Syria. We changed its face to such an extent that no one can recognize the country anymore.

Syria, The Dead

I was certain. Then arms and bullets entered the scene, turning it into displaced people, children living outside in the snow. Historic city centers, another scene, were bombed to ruins. And all these new scenes pushed me toward the path of certainty. Was it worth it to displace all these people, to destroy one of the oldest cities in the world? Numbers, estimates and statistics began to envelope every cell of my brain:

Syria, The Dead

I am Syrian number 21109402. I have been living under an armed conflict for the past 2,160 days. During which I spent 11 days in detention. It is estimated that this conflict has claimed around 510,000 lives, with 6.1 million people internally displaced and 4.8 million seeking refuge abroad. Every day an average of 5 people are killed in Damascus City alone because of random shelling. Every day I head to work with the possibility of being killed by an average of 18 rockets or shells that explode in Damascus. Among all these numbers, there is this 133. We see it around every corner. It passes in front of our eyes every 5 minutes. It is the number of the Red Crescent vans which rush to collect the bodies.

Syria, The Dead

It may be that I know nothing, but of one thing I am certain – we should never have left our houses that morning.

Rahaf Konbaz

Credits

Photo 1: Aleppo, Syria – The Great Mosque – Michael Dinos

Photo 2: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 3: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 4: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 5: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 6: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 7: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Photo 8: Syria, The Dead – Provided by Rahaf Konbaz

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Dastan, S.A. Uncertain Waters – Turkey. March 2019.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in Uruguay, Italy, Czech Republic, Russia, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed and complete collection can be found at www.perypatetik.net.

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Emblem transpoзиция by S.A. Dastan

You are a high school student. You really like geography class and spending time with an atlas. On the first page of the atlas, there is a political map of the world, which divides the earth into numerous countries and depict them in different colors. It is a map of borders. The lines are sometimes so straight that you think they are drawn with a ruler. At the very center of the map, you see Turkey. You liken Turkey, your beloved country, to a heart in the middle of the body. Every inch of its territory belongs to a sacred country. But no sacred places are sheltered from enemies. You never forget the saying that “Turkey’s three sides are encircled with seas, while four sides are encircled with enemies.” You have to be watchful and attentive with respect to Turkey’s enemies – to protect the heritage of your ancestors. Your ancestors had to fight against yedi düvel (seven great powers) and left this soil to you. Your nation is special. As you check the map of Turkey, you see how beautiful Turkey is located at the center of the world. The only unfortunate thing is that the small islands, just a few miles away from Turkey, belong to Greece. There is something wrong with that.

Fethiye, Turkey – At the market

You are a young man and really like to travel the world, often in the form of business trips. On each international flight, for a moment, you imagine the countries in different colors when looking from above. You picture the borders drawn in a bold font. But what you see are only snow-capped mountains, slithering rivers, bluish seas and oceans, and eerie deserts. Each trip you make reveals a geographical continuity that transcends and negates the political borders. The continuity also applies to people. People like humbleness and hate greed; people like cookies at meeting breaks and try not to sleep during long speeches; people like checking their emails at every occasion and feel stressed if their mobile phones are not within reach; people want to be liked on social media and wonder who visits them; people fear being alone but remain so to the end. You draw the conclusion that people are in essence the same, which causes daunting doubt to enter your head: If people are so alike, how can your nation have superior traits to others?

Edirne, Turkey – At the store

You are middle-aged and flying from Greece to Turkey. You are a business class passenger because economy is overbooked, and the airline upgrades you. The cabin crew does its best to make you feel like an important person. You get juice as you sit on your showy seat that suggests you’re in a spaceship cabin, and then you are served various appetizers followed by grilled salmon. You are charmed by the ambiance and round out the scene by adopting an arrogant attitude as if you are the owner of the airline. You take off your jacket but keep your tie on, put your iPad in your classy leather case and ask for Le Monde from the crew. You know that reading a French newspaper is cooler than an English one, not to mention Turkish newspapers. You remember the headline of the day “Migrants: Comment mettre fin à l’hécatombe?” You feel sorry for the people who risked their own lives as well as their family’s to pass across the Mediterranean. You knew Syrians who fled from internal strife to Turkey and try to escape to Greece, often via primitive boats. In the tiny news titles, you can see reports on refugee corpses washing ashore in Turkey or on Greek islands. Even if they survive the Mediterranean, the rest of the journey is laden with belirsizlikler: Living in the adverse conditions of refugee camps, treated as unwelcome foreigners by the local people, and deceived by human smugglers at every stage. For you, it doesn’t make much sense to plunge into such belirsizlik where you risk the lives and futures of yourself and your beloved. You feel pity for the people of poor countries and quite comfortable about your own future where the belirsizlik could be only in minor matters.

Istanbul, Turkey – On Galata bridge

At some point, you take a look at the Mediterranean Sea which is shining thousands of feet below. It is glamorously blue, and no spots are visible in it. You fold up the newspaper with its universally distressing news and decided to read the book you bought at the airport before take-off. It is Paul Auster’s Winter Journal in which he has composed an autobiography where he calls himself “you.” His literary style is impressive, and you keep reading until the pilot announces that the plane is descending to land. You put the book back into the leather case, and take a final look at the sea. Then you murmur all quiet on the Mediterranean.

You have no idea that your complacency is based on an arrogance which the Titanic operators once had. Not long after your last flight travel, things start to change at an unprecedented pace in Turkey. A political confrontation drags the country from its secure port into the belirsiz waters of single strongman’s rule. Every day you hear about people from all parts of society being accused of terror. The strain leads to a foiled coup attempt, which further strengthens the one-man rule. The official gazette starts to publish the names of public officers that the government claims to be affiliated with terror. In each announcement by the official gazette, people rush to the website to check if their name is on the list as well.

Ankara, Turkey – Enjoying the cultural festival

And one night, while checking the table of so-called terror-affiliated people, you find your name along with tens of thousands of others. It is just a name in a long excel table – one single name among more than a hundred thousand people. But for you, this is the end of the life you have known so far. You lose your job and are prevented from getting a new one. You can’t benefit from general insurance. Your passport is canceled, and you are not given a new one. You are a social pariah, and people try to avoid having any contact with you. In the middle of your life, while you have been motivated to protect your country against the “enemies on four sides,” you turn out to be an enemy of the state one night.

Izmir, Turkey – In the tea house

The only asset left to you is your foreign language skills, and you start to work as a freelancer. You move to a cheaper apartment and change your spending habits. After some time, you get used to this new situation and even like to work independently from an office. You have no idea when this is going to end. Your future is completely belirsiz. At one point, you write a short story on “instability” for a foreign agency. They tell you to compose a similar one on belirsizlik for the next year and would like to work with you again. Although you say “it will be a pleasure for me,” you think this crazy period in Turkey will come to an end and you will get back your old job in a year.

Ankara, Turkey – Together

However, things get even worse. The police start to raid the homes of those on the terror-list which covers hundred of thousands of people regardless of age, gender occupation, etc. Your friends, your relatives are taken into the custody with trumped-up charges. Every day you see news on people who are escaping from persecution by fleeing to Greece. Some make it; some are caught by the navy; and some perish. You want to let the world know that not all is quiet on the Mediterranean. But your voice is extremely weak.

One night, you cannot sleep because you feel so helpless and hopeless for yourself, your family and your beloved country. In this depressive mode, you hug your wife in bed and suddenly remember Stefan Zweig who ended his life in his wife’s arms during his self-imposed exile in South America, away from the atrocities of World War II in Europe. However, you think that if he had persevered just a few years more, he would have seen the end of the bloodshed, and not died with so much gloom. You realize there is hope and reason to thank God, as you can still hug your wife, but not a pillow. Then you get out of bed, find an old high school atlas on the dusty bookshelves, open your computer and start to write an essay on belirsizlik.

Ephesus, Turkey – The House of the Mother of God

As you finish your story, you return to the atlas. On the second page of the atlas there is a map of the world where you see glaciers at the edges, oceans in a variety of blues, forests and savannas depicted in green, deserts scattered in pale yellow, and mountainous areas often in dark brown. You are amazed at how tiny pieces of land connect colossal continents, like the Sinai Peninsula between Africa and Asia and the Isthmus of Panama between North and South America. The whole Black Sea opens to the Mediterranean through two narrow straits, the Bosporus, and the Mediterranean opens to the Atlantic Ocean at the gate of Gibraltar. The mountain belts are also astounding: You can see how the Alpine belt stretches along southern Eurasia, including the Pyrenees, Alps, Taurus, towards South Asia and the Hindi Kush, Java and Sumatra. The rivers, like the Nile and Danube, traverse thousands of miles before reaching the seas. You realize that when you climb the Alps, or swim in, say, the Danube, you could have a sense of being part of a much larger and diverse community, which the map or borders cannot reflect. When your bare feet touch the chilly waters of the Mediterranean, taste the salt and smell the seaweed in it, you know that this is our sea.

And while you are thinking about these things, you check the location of your country and see that there are belirsiz waters between Turkey and the small Greek islands. You are sorry that these islands are not so close to Turkey.

S.A. Dastan

Credits

Photo 1: Istanbul, Turkey – The Galata tower – Toni.Flap

Photo 2: Fethiye, Turkey – At the market – Katoosha

Photo 3: Edirne, Turkey – At the store – Demi Merzie

Photo 4: Istanbul, Turkey – On Galata bridge – Franz.12

Photo 5: Ankara, Turkey – Enjoying the cultural festival – Dardanella

Photo 6: Izmir, Turkey – In the tea house – Victor Spacewalker

Photo 7: Ankara, Turkey – Together – Creatista

Photo 8: Ephesus, Turkey – The House of the Mother of God – Lester

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Electra P. Aβεβαιότητα: The Enemy of Romantic Relationships – Greece. February 2018

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in Syria, Uruguay, Italy, Czech Republic, Cuba, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed at www.transposing.net and full text can be found at www.perypatetik.net.

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Emblem transpoзиция by Electra P.

Romance, passion, commitment, love… whatever name we give them, intimate personal relationships are extremely important to most of us. They are precious. Many of you reading this text right now are probably thinking about that special person who makes you smile and your world go round.

Romantic love will exist in our world as long as we, humans, do. It is in our nature to feel the need to connect on a deeper level with a significant other, to care for them, enjoy their fondness and show each other affection. In other words, we need to love and be loved. But, even when we think – and feel – that we have found “the one,” there may be doubts. Difficult questions find a way of creeping into our minds: Are we sure that the person we chose is the right one? Do they feel the same? Are they faithful to us? Can we truly count on them? Will our relationship last? Are our feelings genuine or are we maybe in love with the concept and idea of love itself?

Chania, Crete, Greece – On the street

Uncertainty is one of the greatest enemies of romantic relationships. And it’s an inevitable one. Our future is always unpredictable, and we live our lives not knowing what is going to happen over the next month, day or moment. Some people make plans and try to keep everything under control, but deep down we all know that even our greatest efforts could all be in vain. Uncertainty, either coming from within us or from outside, is part of our everyday life and many of us have come to accept it. Nevertheless, this can change when we are talking about matters of the heart. Love, or even romantic attraction, is known to change the way we think, feel and, most importantly, behave. We become more vulnerable, more sensitive, and often jealous or even possessive towards the other person. An important part of a committed relationship is trust and security. When doubt enters the room, love frequently starts preparing to leave.

Chalkidiki, Greece – Collecting olives

Our own insecurities can play quite a big part in these cases. When we feel uncertain about our worth as an independent individual, we can subsequently feel that we don’t deserve another person’s true love and commitment. We may have doubts about their feelings and intentions; we may feel jealous and instinctively show excessive and visceral possessiveness towards them. We might also have doubts about our own criteria. “Did I choose the right one or is he/she going to hurt my feelings?” is one of the common questions we ask ourselves. This can happen especially when our past experiences are more negative than positive. In those cases, uncertainty and fear that the same old situations will repeat themselves can seriously damage the relationship, driving an uneasy mind out of control.

Nafplio, Greece – Fishing

The truth is we cannot know what the future holds for us. We can never be certain about another person’s thoughts and feelings; we can never fully trust anyone to never break our heart. Our life is and will always be full of uncertainty and many different possibilities, both good and bad. However, we cannot live it in a constant state of anxiety and doubt. Letting go of our fears, both reasonable and unreasonable ones, and focusing on enjoying every single moment can help bring us peace of mind and improve the quality of a romantic relationship. Building our self-confidence is also a key factor that can contribute to a steadier and more positive state of mind, which will benefit all aspects of our life.

Athens, Greece – Ermou

So, we can try to deal with our own demons and defeat them… But, what happens when uncertainty does not come from within but is a direct result of external and wider circumstances? In southern Europe, many countries such as Italy, Spain and Greece struggle with financial crises and high levels of unemployment, especially among young people who would normally be in the most productive years of their lives. The levels of uncertainty about the future are extremely high, as the crisis has continued for many years, and its end does not seem to be near.

Thessaloniki, Greece – At the cafe – goga

In the affected countries, many young people decide not to engage in serious and committed relationships and also choose not to have children, despite their deepest desires and dreams. The future seems bleak and very uncertain to them, as they struggle financially and depend on their parents’ help or on unemployment benefits. It would be very difficult for them to support a home of their own and to raise children; even in a financially stable and secure environment like the one they were raised in 20-30 years ago when the economy was thriving. (Davies, 2014)

Greece – On the run – blas

This kind of uncertainty is much more challenging to overcome. It does not directly depend on our own actions, feelings or thoughts. On the contrary, it is a result of external circumstances that are far beyond our control. Some say that poverty drives love away; we might also say that uncertainty does the same. However, a loveless life is empty. Even when we feel pessimistic about the world around us and unsure about the future, there can be room for feelings that warm our hearts. Maybe it’s especially then that we need love to bring light into our lives. Maybe what we really need is to take a leap of faith.

Athens, Greece – In the park

Looking back, it is obvious that life keeps going forward even under the worst of circumstances. Couples fell in love during WWI and WWII. Nowadays, people marry in refugee camps and right after terrible natural disasters. Their future is uncertain, as is the future of all human beings. Yes, uncertainty can be soul-crushing, but only if we let it affect us in that way. We often tend to focus on its negative side and we do not recognize that not being certain about what the future holds has a hidden beauty: the fact that every single day is full of wonderful and amazing possibilities. Let’s discover them in the arms of our loved one, without fear and teeming with lots of passion.

Electra P.

Works cited

Davies, Lizzy et al., “Marriage falls out of favour for young Europeans as austerity and apathy bite.” The Guardian. July 25, 2014. Accessed on Feb. 23: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/jul/25/marriage-young-europeans-austerity

Credits

Photo 1: Meteora, Greece – Alone – F.Tiare

Photo 2: Chania, Crete, Greece – On the street – Mystical77

Photo 3: Chalkidiki, Greece – Collecting olives – v.verve

Photo 4: Nafplio, Greece – Fishing – goga

Photo 5: Athens, Greece – Ermou – Sonatali

Photo 6: Thessaloniki, Greece – At the cafe – goga

Photo 7:  Greece – On the run – blas

Photo 8: Athens, Greece – In the park – mtv

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Castañeda, Martha Corzo. Worried Workers – Peru. February 2018.

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in Turkey, Syria, Uruguay, Italy, Czech Republic, Cuba, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed at www.transposing.net and full text can be found at www.perypatetik.net.

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Transposing emblem by Martha Corzo Castañeda

At present here, in Lima, both women and men, young and middle-aged, are uncertain about their jobs.

Very few people in search of a job in our capital have found a position over the last two years, among them, many recent graduates, often with good grades.

Pacachamac Lima, Peru – Incas and a suburb

In previous years, when our country was highly regarded internationally, several Chilean companies invested in various areas here. But they do not want to risk their capital any more and over the last few years have not been good for us economically, with some of them doubting whether they will continue in 2019. If they do not, unemployment will rise.

A few years ago, there was a time when many international companies fired a large percentage of their staff worldwide due to the crises in Europe and the United States. Some of the employees that have remained are Peruvians, while others departed. Yes, the truth is that Peru exports its best talent, the reason being that we do not pay Peruvians what they can earn abroad.

Lima, Peru – Bridge of Sighs

Labor situation for women and men

Women are the ones who have more problems when looking for a job. And many of them have trouble finding a secure position so they must accept part-time or informal jobs in areas for non-professionals.

In recent decades, many women who are now looking for a job were hired for a position when they were young and did not have babies. However, afterwards, many of them became pregnant. First, they had one, after a relatively short time they had another, and some of them, in an unguarded moment, had a third. Consequently, they had to decide which activity they would prefer, and, if they chose to bet on the “mother” work, the sad consequence was that they lost their job.

These are some of the women that are now looking for a position. If they return to work, they must have a live-in housemaid to take care of their children, so they need higher salaries. As a result, such employees earn a high salary today, but these jobs are very hard to find in Lima. In some cases, women work only to pay these extra expenses related to children because by working they feel more appreciated.

Lima, Peru – At the music fountain

In the United States, by contrast, the women working as secretaries may leave their jobs and slip back into them at the drop of a hat by calling their bosses when their children reach the age of nursery school, of course if their record is good as an employee.

As you can see, it is very difficult for women to go back to work: bosses think they will be absent too often, and since they do not want this, they do not welcome mothers with small children. When the children grow up, the problem is that the women are not as young as the girls the bosses are looking for to occupy the available positions, especially for some jobs.

In this and other cases, age is a very important factor for employers. Sometimes the most important thing besides physical appearance. There is a maximum age, even for professionals, with experience and qualifications being secondary. You may think that starting a business, especially for the ones that have studied administration-related careers would be a solution, but the likelihood of success in this area is low for women at this moment here in Lima. Why? You need capital. And most of them do not have it (that is one of the reasons, if not the most important one for why they are looking for a job). Even if they manage to find capital, their business would be small, and the big ones would ¨eat¨ it.

Huaraz, Peru – At the street market

Still, many women try this route repeatedly, until none of the people to whom they turn (generally their parents) has money to risk.

The unfair situation for women has also extended beyond this.

On November 15, 2017, Congress approved a Labor Regulation “that forbids wage discrimination between men and women. This standard establishes that the entities offering jobs must guarantee equal terms between men and women in their staff selection processes as well as in pay packages.The norm also requires that in the work training programs 50% of the participants must be women. It says additionally that the entity offering the job must assure that sexual harassment is prevented.1 We are having many problems with this at the present time in our city.

We want this labor law to be obeyed, but legal experts think that in some cases it will be impossible for the companies to comply.

We need the Peruvian authorities to adopt another law forbidding employers from asking job-seekers about their age, especially women. On the other hand, men’s occupational situation is better here, since a higher percentage of men have a job. Nonetheless, it is also uncertain as many of them are not sure about the security of their positions, for the reasons discussed below.

Lima, Peru – On the street

Reasons for job insecurity

The disasters in several Peruvian provinces as well as the corruption scandal in which the troublemaker has been Odebrecht, a Brazilian construction company, have contributed to the high rate of unemployment existing in our country.

According to the admissions of the Brazilian ex-CEO, Marcelo Odebrecht, who has come to an agreement on cooperating with the Peruvian authorities, “the company had a policy of financing presidential candidates with a chance of winning, the purpose being that if one of them acceded to power, the construction company would have an open invitation to undertake projects in the country.”2

All that this ex-CEO has declared in court is being investigated, and, meanwhile, the public projects that they were handling in our country have stopped. Unfortunately, these were the most important public projects. But Odebrecht did not carry out its projects alone; it had joint ventures with Peruvian construction companies, forming groups for the execution of such public projects.

Lima, Peru – On the steps

The ex-CEO has declared that the person who was in direct contact with their Peruvian authorities was Jorge Barata, the Odebrecht Branch Manager for Peru. Now, Barata may also come to an agreement on cooperating with the Peruvian investigators. On December 2nd, he confessed to the way in which they operated to win the tender contract for the South Interoceanic Highway public works project. He said that $20 million was given to Alejandro Toledo, the Peruvian ex-President who was governing Peru at that time, as a bribe to obtain the winning bid. He added that, after a year, when their associated companies received their earnings, each made a “contribution.”

The problem for us is that these companies provide jobs for thousands of Peruvians, and since December 4, their five business owners are in pre-trial detention.

Fortunately, the reconstruction following the disasters in several Peruvian provinces has made this year a little better for the companies engaged in construction related fields, for example bathroom fittings and sanitary products. However, the reconstruction is going slowly because a few years ago there was a change in the governance structure and it was rushed, the consequence being that the governors chosen for each region have not been very well selected and many of them have fallen prey to corruption.

Taquile Island, Puno, Peru – Close up 

Since nothing has been done in almost a year, the person leading the reconstruction was recently replaced, although he was a respectable man. He said that he has been preparing the list of affected inhabitants and planning the reconstruction of the homes and community services damaged by the disasters, but, a whole year or more had passed and actual work had not begun.

In short, there is work in Lima and Peru in general, but it is limited, problematic for women and many of the positions are for unskilled labor or technicians.

It is all very uncertain.

Martha Corzo Castañeda

Works cited

1 El Comercio “Sanción contra la Violencia.” November 16, 2017.

2 Cronica Viva. “Odebrecht afirma que financió campaña de Keiko.” November 10, 2017.

Credits

Photo 1: Lima, Peru – On the coast – alessandro pinto

Photo 2: Pacachamac Lima, Peru – Incas and a suburb – Alice Nerr

Photo 3: Lima, Peru – Bridge of Sighs – alessandro pinto

Photo 4: Lima, Peru – At the music fountain – Pixie.M

Photo 5: Huaraz, Peru – At the street market – Andrushko Galyna

Photo 6: Lima, Peru – On the street – Studio 4-a

Photo 7: Lima, Peru – On the steps – Studio-4a

Photo 8: Taquile Island, Puno, Peru – Close up – Eteri

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Guerrero, Marilin. Crossing the Uncertain Path of Life – Cuba. February 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in Uruguay, Greece, Italy, Czech Republic, Cuba, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed at www.transposing.net and full text can be found at www.perypatetik.net.

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Transposing emblem by Marilin Guerrero

Trying to predict el futuro is like sailing the ocean with no compass to guide our ship. We are surrounded by nothing but water and darkness and still we hope there’s land and light somewhere in the world. Inevitably, there are momentos in our lives when we are just sailors following la dirección of the wind, with no specific harbor to dock in but seeking un destino nonetheless. We spend days, months, and years sailing around, thinking carefully about every step we have taken in the past and what our future steps will be. We become desperate trying to figure out what is going to happen next. Whether we are going to get the job we were applying for just two weeks ago. Whether we will be able to afford la casa we have dreamed of our entire life. Whether we are going to die in a car accident tomorrow or from the disease we have lived with since we were a child. If we are going to end our relationship just because of the fight we had yesterday or if the partner we have now is going to be by our side when we get older and physical beauty no longer exists. These are some of the questions we ask ourselves time and again, in the inquisitive search for the right answers, or at least the answer that can define our lives.

Cienfuegos, Cuba – Surfing at the square

Countless times I have found myself in this situación, trying to puzzle things out, meditating on el futuro because it’s really hard not knowing, living in incertidumbre (uncertainty). Los humanos are designed to fear the unknown, to fear anything that entails a change just because we don’t want to break out of our zona de confort, that place where we feel familiar, at ease and in control of what is happening in our lives. But wouldn’t it be easier if we just lived in the moment without caring so much about our future?

Santa Clara, Cuba – Waiting

I’m not saying that we shouldn’t imagine what nuestro futuro may be like. I know for sure that we must believe in our dreams so that we can accomplish them. There’s a famous quote by Abraham Lincoln that says: “The best way to predict your future is to create it.” Therefore, I strongly believe that we should fight as long as we can for what we want in life because it’s the only way we can make our dreams come true. I believe in the power of our minds and the law of attraction. But I also believe we should enjoy every single minute of our lives without waiting for something to make us happy. There’s another quote I really like. It says: “Happiness is not something you postpone for the future; it is something you design for the present.” There’s no better compass to sail el océano with. If we can head our ship in that dirección, our harbor will be the strongest one on earth and our ship will definitely never sink.

Trinidad, Cuba – In the wall

When we focus all our attention on el futuro, we miss incredible oportunidades both professionally and personally. That’s why I think we should embrace those challenges we are afraid to face as well as embrace those changes we are terrified to make. We shouldn’t feel intimidated by los obstáculos we may find in our way; we should learn to overcome those obstacles even without being absolutely certain about our destination. From all las dificultades I’ve gone through in my life I’ve become stronger, wiser and more self-aware of the things that really matter to the heart: amor, familia, friendship, health. These are the priceless things in our lives, the ones we should fight for, the ones we should enjoy today without thinking about mañana.

Havana, Cuba – Two orishas – Riderfoot

Of course we want to know what is going to happen in el futuro so we can be ready for any dificultad that may arise. Thus, it gets harder for us to make decisions when we are not sure about the consequences of our actions. But las decisiones are always hard and challenging. We can never know if we have made the right one. We are all humans, and it is just part of our lives to be wrong and make mistakes. But in the end, we can actually learn from our mistakes and uncertainties. We should have more trust in our instintos, our emociones, our sentimientos. We shouldn’t doubt when making a decision, whatever the results could be. We will wind up benefiting from the outcome, one way or another. Everything is not always about being certain. So, rather than predicting our future, we can adapt to living in incertidumbre.

Havana, Cuba – Fishing on the Malecon

The key to coping with uncertainty is trying not to resist it. We are all aware that life is full of uncertain momentos and, although we try hard, we cannot avoid them or fight against them; instead we should learn to embrace them. Darkness shouldn’t be a stop on our way to find light and land while we sail in our ship. That’s why I believe that we should be challenged all the time at work, at school and at home, so we can be prepared and react to the new and tough situations in which we may find ourselves crossing the uncertain path of life. We should show resilience despite all los problemas we go through, all los momentos we feel deprimidos y miserables, all the drama and las experiencias negativas. We can finally make it if we are just able to see hope when there’s nothing around us to believe in. That is the essence of what life is about. Believing: that is the essence of what life will always be. Don’t you think?

Marilin Guerrero

Havana, Cuba – Downtown 

Credits

Photo 1: Havana, Cuba – On the street – Oriole Gin

Photo 2: Cienfuegos, Cuba – Surfing at the square – RCH Photo

Photo 3: Santa Clara, Cuba – Waiting – adamico

Photo 4: Trinidad, Cuba – In the wall – Brians Photos

Photo 5: Havana, Cuba – Two orishas – Riderfoot

Photo 6: Havana, Cuba – Fishing on the Malecon – Kamira

Photo 7: Havana, Cuba – Downtown – adamico

Photo 8: Trinidad, Cuba – In the morning – adamico

Trinidad, Cuba – In the morning

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Goumiri, Abdennour. Uncertainty Is All There Is – France. February 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in Uruguay, Greece, Italy, Czech Republic, Cuba, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed at www.transposing.net

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Emblem transpoзиция by Abdennour Goumiri

Europe occidentale has been the theater of a massive exodus of people following the conflicts that erupted in Maghreb (Libye, Tunisie) and the Middle East (Syrie et Irak). Waves of migrants have crossed Turkey and Eastern Europe in search of the promised land, l’Europe. Many have ended up in France applying for asylum. In the countries located south and east de la Méditerranée, many of us think of France as an ideal world, a sort of a sacred land where people ruined by wars and misery journey to find peace at last and regain faith in life. It is perceived to be a refuge where unfortunate people from all over the developing world take shelter and enjoy at last “Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité.”

Strasbourg, France – Dead body protest

In the Arab world, thousands and thousands of us try to reach this promised land each year. We try to set foot there either legally, through the magic door we call a visa, or by irregular means: through smugglers, land borders, clandestine boats, etc. When we finally land in France, many of us are disheartened: All there is pour les immigrants is a life full of uncertainty and questioning.

The security issues, les tensions, the rise of nationalism, the flow de réfugiés and soaring unemployment bode nothing but trouble for newcomers. Immigrating to Europe in this unsure status quo is like crossing seas with a makeshift boat. If we do not have enough energy to swim against all the tides in our way, we drown!

Marseille, France – Waiting at the bus stop

When we land in France, les obstacles that stand in our way are légion, and the first one is … not the customs barrier, but la barrière de la langue.

If we do not know le français, or know just a little, we are not going to catch up to this TGV train that is la société française. We need to speak decent French if we are to work, study, integrate and move across the country. English is not widely used by la population locale. We must greet people not in Arabic with Assalamu alaykoum (hello) but with a “Bonjour” articulated with a correct French R.

And then there is your address. If it is in one of the banlieues françaises immigrées (suburbs), like those of the 93rd department, and if you have a name like Mohammed, Abdallah, etc. that denotes your background. If this is the case, your integration into la société locale, as the benevolent immigrant you are, is definitely undermined.

Strasbourg, France – Advocating assistance

L’environnement general is fairly hostile. La situation actuelle does not support immigration at all. L’atmosphère is tense and les immigrants are used as a scapegoat for all sorts of ills that native residents are facing. We are bombarded daily by bewildering news that saps morale. Subjects discussed relentlessly in les médias français include: waves of réfugiés from the Middle East, attacks terroristes, a state of emergency, closing borders, etc. Furthermore, des mouvements nationalists like le Front National pretending to be the voice of the peuple and population “officielle” are vocal in every election and polemically preach the necessity of repelling these “alien invaders.” Le spectre de l’islamisation is raised ad nauseam in public debates, with reference to sharia (Islamic law), burqas and halal food. No one knows what the future will bring.

La Rochelle, France – On the edge

When we are an asylum seeker in France, we are trapped; we have to wait years and years to apply for the great “Carte de résidence.” Negotiating les autorités administratives is a real obstacle course. As a “sans-papiers” (undocumented) person we must ask relatives and friends now and then for shelter, money and services; we have to flee the police and authorities every day, live an insecure and meaningless life. We may end up working on the black market, in the shadow of la société “officielle,” fearing constantly to be ushered out of the country. All we do is survive.

If we are un immigrant légal, the situation is not enviable. We have to constantly renew all kinds of papers (administratif, work, insurance, taxes, etc.) to preserve our “official” status. We are overwhelmed by the load of formalities to be completed. We are in the same boat.

Strasbourg, France – Freedom of movement

Economically, all of us are in a precarious situation; getting a job may prove to be a real nightmare due to the ongoing difficulties économiques in Europe. If we are lucky enough to find one, we are given a position as a security guard, a supermarket cashier, a public worker, etc. Only a few obtain higher positions in a university or a ministry or the like.

As for housing, this is nothing to laugh about. Rent prices cost an arm and a leg in France. All we can rent is an HLM (low-cost housing) or a studio apartment located in une banlieue d’immigrés outside the big cities. Actually, a foreigner who earns small amounts of money, who has to pay for food, medicines, transportation, etc. cannot support himself properly when rent is to be paid at the end of the month.

If we cast anchor in the “Hexagon” forever because we have been granted citizenship, we are not off the hook yet; besides economic problems, we have to struggle amidst un océan de questions culturelles.

Many of us desire to teach our native language, traditions and religion to our progeny in order to preserve the fading memory and customs we have brought from the homeland. However, when living in this société diverse that exists in Europe, a lot gets between you and your resolutions: the way of life, the cultural values, the political system, the ideology, etc.

Marseille, France – At the Old Port of Marseille

Par exemple, few Muslims in France celebrate Eid al-Adha (Sacrifice Feast), which is the most holy festival pour les musulmans. In fact, les autorités locales have strict regulations for sacrificing animals (sheep). Consequently, children with an immigrant background miss a very fundamental element of their parent’s culture.

Le problème is, in this quickly changing world, if we do not know where we came from and who we are, we are a boat drifting in an ocean of uncertainty. We are headed wherever the tides carry us. We are everybody and at the same time nobody.

Le Mont Saint Michel, France – Chapel

When all the doors are closed in front of us, many of us face a dilemma: go back home or stay aboard forever. Some return. Others go back and forth endlessly between their country de residence and their pays d’origine, to see their famille, attend a wedding, a funérailles, etc. Some stay. But in part the outcome is the same in each case. If we decide to stay, we are overwhelmed by la frustration et la nostalgie in a foreign country where there are only promises and illusions. If we choose to rejoin the homeland, there is nothing but a desert of unemployment and poverty. One way or the other, the road for immigrants leads to uncertainty.

Abdennour Goumiri

Credits

Photo 1: Paris, France – The Louvre – Songquan Deng

Photo 2: Strasbourg, France – Dead body protest – Hadrian

Photo 3: Marseille, France – Waiting at the bus stop – Travelview

Photo 4: Strasbourg, France – Advocating assistance – Hadrian

Photo 5: La Rochelle, France – On the edge – kipgodi

Photo 6: Strasbourg, France – Freedom of movement – Hadrian

Photo 7: Marseille, France – At the Old Port of Marseille – velirina

Photo 8: Le Mont Saint Michel, France – Chapel – vvoevale

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Samir, Ahmed. Uncertainty in Personal Life. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in Cuba, Uruguay, Greece, Italy, Czech Republic, Cuba, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed at www.transposing.net

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Emblem transpoзиция by Ahmed Samir

Our lives are teeming with uncertainties, whether in the field of professional work, raising children, social relations or elsewhere. The difficulty with uncertainty is that we do not know in advance what circumstances might occur when choosing an alternative, that is, we have no information about the likely possibilities for each alternative. In other words, the available information is minimal, making any prediction of the best results very challenging.

Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt – On the road

In the field of professional work, I seek to find a career that will let me achieve my goals and aspirations. I may move from one career to another if I am uncertain about whether this career is the one through which I can achieve my goals, even if I have gathered as much information as possible before starting a particular career. In addition, I will try to communicate with some people who practice the same profession and have real experience. I may even go beyond that and do my best to look for some specialized centers that offer courses for beginners who are interested in starting a particular career. I begin with courses that may address the theoretical and practical aspects in some detail. I try to study these aspects from an abstract point of view and follow the workshops with passion until my understanding is rounded out by absorbing the practical part that is most important.

Egypt – On the Nile – paulvinten

Despite all these actions I may have taken before starting a career, I still face the risk of uncertainty. Is this the right profession or is there another profession that is more appropriate? Will I achieve my goals in this profession with my degree or is there something better? Is my career development rate the desired one or not? If I am now the best employee in my department who always gets the highest ratings in the periodic employee evaluations of the organization, will another employee come to outperform me and have a head start? Will the organization change the evaluation criteria one day or will it remain the same?

Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt – Locals

If I talk about raising my children, the risk of uncertainty continues to chase me. I analyze the personalities of my children to know what development programs will suit them. I monitor their behavior from time to time and then develop a program for behavioral evaluation that takes into account the individual differences and the actual environment in which they live. The program also includes the methods of reward and punishment to achieve the best results. I also seek to discover their talents and skills in various ways and then prepare a practical plan to develop these talents and skills as well as focusing on their way of thinking and the development of intelligence. I also concentrate on the health aspect in terms of cleanliness and nutrition to maintain a healthy body. I even encourage them to engage in useful sports with follow up from my side. Moreover, I’m interested in spending some time with them to develop their emotional side and build a positive relationship with them through which I can influence and guide them effectively. I also follow their progress in education and offer the necessary support. However, I still confront uncertainty. For example, I may face an emergency that prevents me from continuing to implement the program of behavioral evaluation or the plan to discover and develop talents and skills. This may also prevent me from implementing these programs and plans in an ideal way, which may result in my children’s failure to achieve the required goals. There may be changes in reality around us, and the plans may become impossible to reconcile with these changes, or my children may be not able to keep up with the requirements of the future.

Luxor, Egypt – Renting bikes

In terms of social relations with others, there is also uncertainty. I make an effort to select my friends and seek to build strong and successful relationships with others whether they are friends, relatives or other members of society at large. To build these strong and successful relationships, I adopt multiple methods. I make others feel that they are important by offering them courtesy and focusing on their positive aspects. I also pick the right words for everyone and treat them gently. I do my best to be patient with opinions and ideas that I disagree with and accept others so that they feel relaxed when talking with me. And to reach the hearts of others, I use fun and optimism so that they come to me when they have a need and want my companionship. I am careful not to talk about myself unless the other side asks me to do so and I do not impose myself or my ideas on others. I also offer advice to others in a confidential and gentle manner that does not embarrass them.

Hurghada, Egypt – Pumping sewage

However, it is obvious that social relations are closely tied to the other party. If we assume that those who seek to build successful social relations have taken all possible steps to ensure that they achieve this, there is no guarantee for the other party or that they will be able to maintain, enhance, improve and strengthen this relationship. Hence, there is a threat of uncertainty.

Egypt – Getting a haircut

To summarize, it is difficult to overcome uncertainty because it is often related to future variables that we cannot accurately identify. A practical solution is to try to reduce the negative effects of uncertainty as much as possible through strategic planning that takes into account all the variables and incorporates continuously updated data so that all the developments are studied. Great importance should also be attached to the collection of information from multiple sources. Finally, the most likely outcome should be determined by examining each possibility and preparing the right solutions in advance.

Ahmed Samir

Postcard emblem at 1080

Credits

Photo 1: Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt – Sitting – asayenka

Photo 2: Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt – On the road – asayenka

Photo 3: Egypt – On the Nile – paulvinten

Photo 4: Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt – Locals – asayenka

Photo 5: Luxor, Egypt – Renting bikes – Paul Prescott

Photo 6: Hurghada, Egypt – Pumping sewage – Ai-kon

Photo 7: Egypt – Getting a haircut – paulvinten

Postcard emblem at 1080

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.org and www.transposing.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Quintero, Jonay. The Fear of Not Knowing – España. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in France, Uruguay, Saudi-Arabia, Greece, Italy, Czech Republic, Cuba, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed at www.transposing.net

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.

Transposing emblem by Jonay Quintero

According to the Cambridge English Dictionary online the meaning of “uncertainty” is a situation in which something is not known or [it is] something that is not known or certain. An obvious emphasis is placed on the words “not known” and el concepto of “certain.” We, humans, all have a taste for safety and certainty about the facts, el futuro, and even, the past (we will look at this later). That is what we have been fighting for over the last 40,000 años. Getting up at 4:30 am to work on una parcela of land till sunset meant a vast improvement over having to face a mammoth in a group or on your own; working in a factory was another improvement en comparación to having to plow land; and working by sitting at a computer is an immense advance relative to all the later. Each of these phases was a step towards safety, comfort and some sort of certainty.

Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain – Looks nice

No doubt, we all like to know that nuestros salaries will be paid at the beginning of each month and someday we will be able to get a retirement pension. La generación de nuestros padres quite often held the same position for most of their working life; unfortunately, los trabajos fijos are no longer available for most of us certainty lovers. It is not una aspiración irrazonable to expect the swimming pool to be full before diving into it (unless you are a crazy, drunk, or a vacationer intending to practice balconing1), but those times are gone, se fueron,2 never to come back.

Garachico, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain – Stretching out

The adventurous ones will not miss them because uncertainty might be fearful, but is also the spice de la vida. La razón why some people prefer to remain in their comfort zones (trendy phrase nowadays) while others throw themselves blindly into the darkness of not knowing is un misterio that has remained unsolved since the beginning of times. Getting into the unknown is always scary but also liberating, seems like nothing else can go any worse when you are alone in la inmensidad del océano o space, or the job center queue… There is a certain strength in feeling alone and small like when you are in a desert or visit a foreign country on your own for the first time.

Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain – What do you think?

Muchas personas get hooked on that sensation, that discharge de adrenalina, and never manage to settle down again. They become wanderers. Just wonder for a second how it might have felt for the early explorers, navigators or adventurers that crossed an ocean, a desert or a jungle for the first time. They probably shivered in fear but moved ahead nonetheless. If it were not for people like them, we probably would never have come out of the cave.

Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain – Looks nice here too

Uncertainty about the future can be an important issue but not knowing about your past, your origins, must also be a source of muchos problemas actuales y mucha angustia. In this regard, I often noticed the urge many Americans have to know about their ancestors or genealogía, which led to the current hype surrounding the genetic tests that tell you, among other things, which ethnic groups correspond, in percentages, to the basic groups of genes that configure your genetic make-up. I admit now that I had many preconceptions about them in regard to this issue. It seemed to me that there was a whole load de racismo and old-fashioned pride behind this interest. As if they were all expecting to be descendants of Napoleon, el zar de Rusia, or some other figura importante, all of them white of course.

Firgas, Canary Islands, Spain – Stuck

But now I see it from una perspectiva diferente. I imagine that living in una sociedad tan diversa, that imposes a single culture on everyone but integrates nobody, where everybody is Afro-American, Irish-American, Polish-American, etc., must be frustrating to some degree. Everybody needs some kind of roots, knowing where they come from to gain at least una vaga idea of where the heck they should be heading. I understand them now…I swear to God that I understand them because I did one of those tests myself.

I guess that I have always been interested in history…but the point is that for reasons that are my sole business I did one of those tests. I am not a geneticist and not acquainted with the science behind it, but the aim of this test is to find out what your paternal and maternal haplogroups3 are, that is, en inglés simple, this test tells you what percentage of your genetic heritage is Eastern European, Asian or African, for example.

El Cotillo, Fuerteventura island, Spain – Music 

I am an isleño4 and was born en las Islas Canarias, a tiny archipiélago conquered by the crown of Castile in the XV century. The aborigines, of Berber or Amazigh5 origin, resisted los conquistadores europeos for 96 años in fierce wars that came to an end four años after the discovery of America. En la sociedad canaria today, there is un gran tabú tácito about your ethnic origins. The common belief is that los aborígenes were exterminated and nowadays isleños are descendants de los conquistadores españoles, and people consider themselves puramente blanca y europea. There is constant fear that if we admit otherwise, that will reinforce the claim of the king of Morocco who would take over the islands, force us all to become Muslims and we would go back to the Middle Ages.

Tenerife Candelaria, Canary Islands, Spain – Mansay Guanches

Call it what you like, but fear is the most irrational of feelings. Once I was told about una persona who tore off a whole page of an antique registry book on baptisms from a local church because that was the only evidence of their aborigine ancestors. Based on the genetic test, the specific haplogrupo de los aborígenes de las Islas Canarias is the U6b-c, the very same that appeared on my sheet with the results. According to it, I am 64% aborigine, 32% Spanish/Portuguese and a 4% Black African. Of course, I am aware that esta tecnología is not so precise at the moment and if I do tests from several other companies I will get diferentes porcentajes, but nonetheless, with this sheet in my hand, I did not feel inferior to anyone, nor superior to anyone either. It did not change much about mi vida although… I cried as I have not cried since I was a child… As to why… I’m uncertain.

Jonay Quintero

Postcard emblem at 1080

Endnotes

1. Anglicism of the Spanish word balcón, depicts the custom of many young tourists in Spanish resorts, consisting in jumping either to a swimming pool from balconies several floors above ground or from one balcony to another, with the subsequent risk to their lives and other people’s.

2. They are gone.

3. Group of genes that have been inherited from a common ancestor.

4. Islander or native of the Canary Islands.

5. People give the name Berber to themselves, it means “freeman.”

Credits

Photo 1: Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain – Spiraling upward or downward – dziewul

Photo 2: Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain – Looks nice – Mark Pitt

Photo 3: Garachico, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain – Stretching out – gadzius

Photo 4: Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain – What do you think? – Tupungato

Photo 5: Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain – Looks nice here too – Tupungato

Photo 6: Firgas, Canary Islands, Spain – Stuck – Chireau

Photo 7: El Cotillo, Fuerteventura island, Spain – Music – Ross Helen

Photo 8: Tenerife Candelaria, Canary Islands, Spain – Mansay Guanches – Grommik

Postcard emblem at 1080

Locations

Real: Postcard emblems in The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed and The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed on display at 1080

Virtual: www.perypatetik.org and www.transposing.net

Social: Cinemblem (cine emblem) at www.facebook.com/Perypatetik

The Codex of Uncertainty Transposed

Cordido, Veronica. The Crib of Uncertainty – Venezuela. January 2018.

Lozano, Gabriela. El cuchillo de la incertidumbre : Piercing Uncertainty – México. January 2018.

Forthcoming

Translators and writers in France, Uruguay, Saudi-Arabia, Greece, Italy, Czech Republic, Cuba, Paraguay, Argentina, Germany, Romania, Spain, America, Britain, and more…

The Anthology of Global Instability Transposed

Table of contents for The Archive of Global Instability Transposed at www.transposing.net

Alvisi, Andrea. Political and Social Instability: The Brexit Mess. May 2017.

Bahras. Unstable Air Pollution – Unstable Solutions: Mongolia. June 2017.

Bichen, Svetlana Novoselova. Mental and Cultural Instability: Russia and Turkey. February 2017.

Bondarenko, Evgeny. Hybrid War: Ukraine. December 2018.

Borghi, Silvana Renée. Living in Inestabilidad. September 2017.

Caetano, Raphael. Instabilidade emocional: Brazil. February 2017.

Çakır, Peren. On the Road in Search of Stability: Argentina and Turkey. June 2017.

Casas, Marilin Guerrero. Emotional Estabilidad: The Key To a Happy Life – Cuba. December 2017.

Charles-Dee. Social Onstabiliteit – South Africa. December 2017.

Cordido, Verónica. Instability, a Stable Reality: Venezuela and America. April 2017.

Dastan, S.A. The Stability of Instability: Turkey and Syria. March 2017.

D’Adam, Anton. Psychosocial Instability in Argentina and America: El granero del mundo and The Manifest Destiny. January 2017.

Delibasheva, Emilia. Political Instability: Electoral Coups in America and Bulgaria. December 2016.

Ellie. Angry Folk: Korea. June 2017.

Farid, Isis Kamal. Stability Is Not An Option – Egypt. August 2017.

Friedrich, Angelika. Introduction: The Emblem of Instability. September 2016.

Fondevik, Vigdis. Unstable Nature: Norway and Denmark. October 2016.

Ghadir, Younes. Political Instability – Lebanon. September 2017.

Gómez, Javier. The Way of No Way – Argentina and the UK. December 2017.

Gotera, Jay R. In Flux Amid Rising Local and Regional Tensions – Philippines. November 2017.

Guillot, Iulianna. Starting and Staying in Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Gjuzelov, Zoran. The Нестабилност of Transition – Macedonia. November 2017.

Halimi, Sophia. Modern Instabilité: Youth and Employment in France and China. March 2017.

Hernandez, Jonay Quintero. Embracing Instability – Spain. February 2017.

Kelvin, Sera. The Stability in Expecting Emotional Instability: Brazil. April 2017.

Konbaz, Rahaf. The Castaways: On the Verge of Life – Syria. August 2017.

Korneeva, Ekaterina. Instability… or Flexibility? July 2017.

Kreutzer, Karina. Hidden Instabilität – Ecuador and Switzerland. December 2017.

Krnceska, Sofija. Decades of Economic Instability – Macedonia. September 2017.

Kutscher, Karin. Inestabilidad in Interpersonal Relationships – Chile. October 2017.

Larousse, Annabelle. Legal and Emotional Instability in a Transgender Life – Ireland. August 2017.

Larrosa, Mariela. The Very Stable Spanish Instability. April 2017.

Lobos, José. Political Instability: Guatemala. May 2017.

Lozano, Gabriela. Estructuras Inestables: Vignettes of a Contemporary, Not Quite Collapsing Country – Mexico. November 2017.

MacSweeny, Michael. A House on a Hill – America. October 2017.

Mankevich, Tatiana. The Absence of Linguistic Cтабiльнасць: Does the Belarusian Language Have a Future? December 2016.

McGuiness, Matthew. Loving Lady Instability. November 2017.

Meschi, Isabelle. Linguistic Instabilité and Instabilità: France and Italy. November 2016.

Mitra, Ashutosh. The Instability of Change: India. January 2016.

Moussly, Sahar. The Instability of Tyranny: Syria and the Syrian Diaspora. December 2016.

Nastou, Eliza. Psychological Αστάθεια and Inestabilidad during the Economic Crisis: Greece and Spain. December 2016.

Nevosadova, Jirina. Whatever Happens, It Is Experience. May 2017.

Olisthoughts. Stable Instability – Moldova. October 2017.

Partykowska, Natalia. Niestabilność and адсутнасць стабільнасці in the Arts: Polish and Belarusian Theater. January 2017.

Payan, Rodrigo Arenas. Impotence – Venezuela and Columbia. September 2017.

Persio, P.L.F. Social Instabilità and Instabiliteit: Italy and the Netherlands. November 2016.

Pranevich, Liubou. Cultural Instability: Belarus and Poland. March 2017.

Protić, Aleksandar. Demographic Instability: Serbia. July 2017.

Romano, Mavi. Unstable Identities: Ecuador and Europe. October 2016.

Sekulić, Jelena. Нестабилност/Nestabilnost in Language – Serbia. August 2017.

Sepa, Andreea. Instabilitate vs. Stabilität: How Important Are Cultural Differences? – Romania and Germany. September 2017.

Shunit. Economic Instability: Guinea and Gambia. April 2017.

Shalunova, Marina. Language Instability: Russia. June 2017

Sitorus, Rina. Instabilitas Toleransi: Indonesia. May 2017.

Skrypka, Vladyslav. National нестійкість: Ukraine. July 2017.

Staniulis, Justas. Nestabilumas of Gediminas Hill and the Threat to the Symbol of the State: Lithuania. July 2017.

Sousa, Antonia. Social and Economic Instabilidade: Portugal. January 2017.

Vuka. My Intimate Imbalanced Inclination. March 2017.

Walton, Éva. Historical and Psychological Bizonytalanság within Hungarian Culture. January 2017.

Yücel, Sabahattin. The Instability of Turkish Education and its Effect on Culture and Language: Turkey. July 2017.

Zadrożna-Nowak, Amelia. Economic Instability: Poles at Home and the Polish Diaspora. November 2016.

Zakharova, Anastasiya. Instability in Relationships: Russia. April 2017.